Master of Science in Computer Information Systems (blended)

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The Master of Science (MS) in Computer Information Systems program is designed for those who wish to combine technical competence in information systems with knowledge of managerial and organizational issues.

Students who complete the master’s degree in Computer Information Systems will be able to demonstrate:

  • Advanced knowledge in the analysis and documentation of requirements for architecture, design, and implementation of computer applications systems.
  • Proficiency in software and computing skills as they pertain to the design and implementation of database systems, data communications, systems analysis, and design.
  • Competence sufficient to identify current and emerging information technologies that may have strategic value for enterprise; assess where those technologies have value; and manage the implementation of those technologies in the enterprise.

The blended format combines the best elements of classroom and online teaching. Using the most current Internet and communication technologies, the blended format supports ongoing student/faculty collaboration and interaction while reducing the time required for face-to-face meetings. Our courses are designed to align with the latest research on cognitive learning and educational technologies. In addition to providing flexibility to suit busy professional lifestyles, blended courses deliver a solid academic foundation, important practical skills, and critical business competencies.

Concentrations

Students may choose to pursue one of the following concentrations:

MS in Computer Information Systems (blended) Program Options

Available in the blended format as well as:

A blended MSCIS course includes:

  1. Four on-campus sessions with lectures and discussions related to online course material. Some may also have hands-on labs and activities to develop technical and business-critical skills.
  2. Online course content, conveniently accessible in Blackboard Learn. This may include online lectures, videos, interactive animations, and instructor-led discussion boards. During the online weeks, students may submit homework assignments, projects, papers, and assessments via the course website.
  3. Possible interactive online seminars and/or recorded lectures, during the weeks that students are not on campus, led by the instructors covering the most important topics, providing homework guidance and answering student questions.
  4. A fifth on-campus session for the final exam or project presentation.

Applicants to the blended-format MS in Computer Information Systems program must have a bachelor’s degree, and are required to submit official transcripts of previous academic work, three letters of recommendation, personal statement, and résumé.

In addition, applicants must complete the prerequisites listed below or demonstrate an equivalent level of proficiency through prior college-level courses or a waiver examination. Students are advised to discuss their background with the graduate student advisor in order to determine the best sequence of courses.

A maximum of two graduate-level courses (8 credits) taken at Metropolitan College before acceptance into the program may be applied toward the degree.

Apply here.

Academic Standing

A minimum passing grade for a course in the graduate program is a C (2.0) but an average grade of B (3.0) must be maintained to be in good academic standing and satisfy the degree requirements.

Students who have prior programming experience must complete:

This course is a technically-oriented introductory survey of information technology. Students learn about basic computer information, different types of business systems and basic systems analysis, design and development. Students also study basic mathematics, software development and create simple Java programs.  [ 4 cr. ]

Spring 2019
Section Type Instructor Location Days Times
B1 IND T 6:00 pm – 8:45 pm
O1 IND ARR
Fall 2018
Section Type Instructor Location Days Times
B1 IND Keklak SHA 210 T 6:00 pm – 8:45 pm
O1 IND Bragg ARR

If college-level credit courses are not in evidence, the department will determine what prerequisite courses must be completed in addition to graduate degree requirements. Students claiming equivalent proficiency in the prerequisite courses from non-academic sources must take an examination to demonstrate such proficiency.

A maximum of two graduate-level courses (8 credits) taken at Metropolitan College before acceptance into the program may be applied toward the degree.

The blended-format MS in Computer Information Systems core curriculum consists of ten required courses.

Core Curriculum

(Five courses/20 credits)

This course presents the foundations of data communications and takes a bottom-up approach to computer networks. The course concludes with an overview of basic network security and management concepts. Prereq: MET CS 200, or instructor's consent. This course may not be taken in conjunction with MET CS 425 (undergraduate) or MET CS 535. Only one of these courses can be counted towards degree requirements.  [ 4 cr. ]

Spring 2019
Section Type Instructor Location Days Times
B1 IND Arena T 6:00 pm – 8:45 pm
E1 IND Arena T 6:00 pm – 8:45 pm
O1 IND Rizinski ARR
O2 IND Mansur ARR
Fall 2018
Section Type Instructor Location Days Times
B1 IND Arena KCB 102 T 6:00 pm – 8:45 pm
O1 IND Rizinski ARR
O2 IND Rizinski ARR

Students learn the latest relational and object-relational tools and techniques for persistent data and object modeling and management. Students gain extensive hands- on experience using Oracle or Microsoft SQL Server as they learn the Structured Query Language (SQL) and design and implement databases. Students design and implement a database system as a term project. Restrictions: Only for MS CIS. This course may not be taken in conjunction with MET CS 469 (undergraduate) or MET CS 579. Only one of these courses can be counted towards degree requirements.  [ 4 cr. ]

Spring 2019
Section Type Instructor Location Days Times
A1 IND Wolfe M 6:00 pm – 8:45 pm
C1 IND Maiewski W 6:00 pm – 8:45 pm
O1 IND Mansur ARR
O2 IND Farr ARR
BCL IND Parrott U 8:00 am – 3:30 pm
BHA IND M 6:00 pm – 8:45 pm
Fall 2018
Section Type Instructor Location Days Times
C1 IND Maiewski CGS 515 W 6:00 pm – 8:45 pm
D1 IND Matthews FLR 134 R 6:00 pm – 8:45 pm
E1 IND Matthews FLR 134 R 6:00 pm – 8:45 pm
O1 IND Mansur ARR
O2 IND Mansur ARR

Object-oriented methods of information systems analysis and design for organizations with data- processing needs. System feasibility; requirements analysis; database utilization; Unified Modeling Language; software system architecture, design, and implementation, management; project control; and systems-level testing.   [ 4 cr. ]

Spring 2019
Section Type Instructor Location Days Times
C1 IND Guadagno W 6:00 pm – 8:45 pm
D1 IND Guadagno R 6:00 pm – 8:45 pm
E1 IND Guadagno R 6:00 pm – 8:45 pm
O1 IND Braude ARR
O2 IND Williams ARR
Fall 2018
Section Type Instructor Location Days Times
D1 IND Guadagno KCB 102 R 6:00 pm – 8:45 pm
E1 IND Guadagno KCB 102 R 6:00 pm – 8:45 pm
O1 IND Williams ARR
O2 IND Polnar ARR

This course describes and compares contemporary and emerging information technology and its management. Students learn how to identify information technologies of strategic value to their organizations and how to manage their implementation. The course highlights the application of I.T. to business needs. CS 782 is at the advanced Masters (700) level, and it assumes that students understand IT systems at the level of CS 682 Systems Analysis and Design. Students who haven't completed CS 682 should contact their instructor to determine if they are adequately prepared. Prereq: MET CS 682, or instructor's consent.   [ 4 cr. ]

Spring 2019
Section Type Instructor Location Days Times
D1 IND Arakelian R 6:00 pm – 8:45 pm
E1 IND Arakelian R 6:00 pm – 8:45 pm
O1 IND Williams ARR
O2 IND Arakelian ARR
Fall 2018
Section Type Instructor Location Days Times
D1 IND Arakelian FLR 121 R 6:00 pm – 8:45 pm
O1 IND Arakelian ARR
O2 IND Williams ARR

And one of the following*:

This course covers the concepts of object-oriented approach to software design and development using the Java programming language. It includes a detailed discussion of programming concepts starting with the fundamentals of data types, control structures methods, classes, applets, arrays and strings, and proceeding to advanced topics such as inheritance and polymorphism, interfaces, creating user interfaces, exceptions, and streams. Upon completion of this course the students will be able to apply software engineering criteria to design and implement Java applications that are secure, robust, and scalable. Prereq: MET CS 200 or MET CS 300 or Instructor's Consent. Not recommended for students without a programming background.   [ 4 cr. ]

Spring 2019
Section Type Instructor Location Days Times
D1 IND R 6:00 pm – 8:45 pm
O1 IND Guardino M 7:00 am – 8:00 am
O2 IND Guardino ARR
BCL IND Kieffer S 8:30 am – 4:00 pm
Fall 2018
Section Type Instructor Location Days Times
E1 IND Donald KCB 104 M 6:00 pm – 8:45 pm
O2 IND Guardino ARR
BHA IND Orsini ROOM M 6:00 pm – 8:45 pm

This course covers the concepts of the object-oriented approach to software design and development using the Python programming language. It includes a detailed discussion of programming concepts starting with the fundamentals of data types, control structures methods, classes, arrays and strings, and proceeding to advanced topics such as inheritance and polymorphism, creating user interfaces, exceptions and streams. Upon completion of this course students will be capable of applying software engineering principles to design and implement Python applications that can be used in conjunction with analytics and big data. Prerequisite: MET CS 300 Foundations of Modern Computing, or instructor's consent.  [ 4 cr. ]

Spring 2019
Section Type Instructor Location Days Times
A1 IND M 6:00 pm – 8:45 pm
C1 IND Pinsky W 6:00 pm – 8:45 pm
E1 IND Pinsky W 6:00 pm – 8:45 pm
O1 IND Pinsky ARR
O2 IND Pinsky ARR
Fall 2018
Section Type Instructor Location Days Times
A1 IND Lu CAS 213 M 6:00 pm – 8:45 pm
C1 IND Aleksandrov CAS 226 W 6:00 pm – 8:45 pm
D1 IND Pinsky CGS 527 R 6:00 pm – 8:45 pm
O1 IND Pinsky ARR
O2 IND Pinsky ARR

*If a student chooses to take both MET CS 520 and MET CS 521, the first course completed will fulfill the core requirement and the second course completed will count as an elective.

Students who have completed courses on core curriculum subjects as part of their undergraduate degree program or have relevant work-related experience may request permission from the Department of Computer Science to replace the corresponding core courses with graduate-level computer information systems electives. Please refer to the MET CS Academic Policies Manual for further details.

Required Courses

(One course/4 credits)

Students who are not choosing to complete a concentration must take MET CS 546 Quantitative Methods for Information Systems in addition to the core curriculum and general electives.

The goal of this course is to provide Computer Information Systems students with the mathematical fundamentals required for successful quantitative analysis of problems in the field of business computing. The first part of the course introduces the mathematical prerequisites for understanding probability and statistics. Topics include combinatorial mathematics, functions, and the fundamentals of differentiation and integration. The second part of the course concentrates on the study of elementary probability theory, discrete and continuous distributions. Prereq: Academic background that includes the material covered in a standard course on college algebra or instructor's consent.  [ 4 cr. ]

Spring 2019
Section Type Instructor Location Days Times
A1 IND Gorlin M 6:00 pm – 8:45 pm
B1 IND T 6:00 pm – 8:45 pm
O1 IND Temkin ARR
O2 IND Temkin ARR
Fall 2018
Section Type Instructor Location Days Times
A1 IND Gorlin CAS 324 M 6:00 pm – 8:45 pm
B1 IND Gorlin EPC 206 T 6:00 pm – 8:45 pm
E1 IND Gorlin EPC 206 T 6:00 pm – 8:45 pm
O1 IND Temkin ARR
O2 IND Temkin ARR

General Electives

(Four courses/16 credits)

Students who are not pursuing a concentration must select four elective courses from the following list. Electives other than those listed below must be approved by the student’s advisor. In choosing electives, students should make sure that they have all prerequisites required by the selected course. At least three elective courses must be at the 600 level or above:

This course is designed for IT professionals, and those training to be IT professionals, who are preparing for careers in healthcare-related IT (Health Informatics). This course provides a high-level introduction into basic concepts of biomedicine and familiarizes students with the structure and organization of American healthcare system and the roles played by IT in that system. The course introduces medical terminology, human anatomy and physiology, disease processes, diagnostic modalities, and treatments associated with common disease processes. IT case studies demonstrate the key roles of health informatics and how IT tools and resources help medical professionals integrate multiple sources of information to make diagnostic and therapeutic decisions.  [ 4 cr. ]

Spring 2019
Section Type Instructor Location Days Times
B1 IND T 6:00 pm – 8:45 pm
E1 IND T 6:00 pm – 8:45 pm
Fall 2018
Section Type Instructor Location Days Times
O1 IND Keskin ARR

This course presents the technological fundamentals and integrated clinical applications of modern Biomedical IT. The first part of the course covers the technological fundamentals and the scientific concepts behind modern medical technologies, such as digital radiography, CT, nuclear medicine, ultrasound imaging, etc. It also presents various medical data and patient records, and focuses on various techniques for processing medical images. This part also covers medical computer networks and systems and data security and protection. The second part of the course focuses on actual medical applications that are used in health care and biomedical research.   [ 4 cr. ]

Spring 2019
Section Type Instructor Location Days Times
C1 IND W 6:00 pm – 8:45 pm
E1 IND W 6:00 pm – 8:45 pm
Fall 2018
Section Type Instructor Location Days Times
O2 IND Zhang ARR

Electronic Health Records (EHRs) are application systems that automate the activities of healthcare clinicians including physicians, nurses, physician assistants, and healthcare administrative staff. Use of EHRs is increasing rapidly due to the systems' benefits and federal government programs to deploy EHRs. This increased use of EHRs has many challenges including complex data, high security requirements, integration to multiple application systems, a distributed user base, and broad impact on how these users work.   [ 4 cr. ]

Spring 2019
Section Type Instructor Location Days Times
O1 IND Levinger ARR
Fall 2018
Section Type Instructor Location Days Times
A1 IND Levinger CGS 113 M 6:00 pm – 8:45 pm
E1 IND Levinger CGS 113 M 6:00 pm – 8:45 pm

This course focuses on building core competencies in web design and development. It begins with a complete immersion into HTML essentially XHTML and Dynamic HTML (DHTML). Students are exposed to Cascading Style Sheets (CSS), as well as Dynamic CSS. The fundamentals of JavaScript language including object-oriented JavaScript is covered comprehensively. AJAX with XML and JSON are covered, as they are the primary means to transfer data from client and server. Prereq: For CIS Students: MET CS 200 Fundamentals of Information Technology, or instructor's consent. For CS and TC Students: MET CS 231 or MET CS 232, or instructor's consent.  [ 4 cr. ]

Spring 2019
Section Type Instructor Location Days Times
B1 IND Sheehan T 6:00 pm – 8:45 pm
E1 IND Sheehan T 6:00 pm – 8:45 pm
Fall 2018
Section Type Instructor Location Days Times
A1 IND Sheehan MCS B19 M 6:00 pm – 8:45 pm
O2 IND Bishop ARR

This course provides students with a comprehensive overview of the principles, processes, and practices of software project management. Students learn techniques for planning, organizing, scheduling, and controlling software projects. There is substantial focus on software cost estimation and software risk management. Students will obtain practical project management skills and competencies related to the definition of a software project, establishment of project communications, managing project changes, and managing distributed software teams and projects.   [ 4 cr. ]

Spring 2019
Section Type Instructor Location Days Times
A1 IND M 6:00 pm – 8:45 pm
E1 IND Heda M 6:00 pm – 8:45 pm
Fall 2018
Section Type Instructor Location Days Times
D1 IND Heda EPC 203 R 6:00 pm – 8:45 pm
O1 IND Kanabar ARR

Theory and practice of security and quality assurance and testing for each step of the software development cycle. Verification vs. validation. Test case design techniques, test coverage criteria, security development and verification practices, and tools for static and dynamic analysis. Standards. Test-driven development. QA for maintenance and legacy applications. From a project management knowledge perspective, this course covers the methods, tools and techniques associated with the following processes -- Plan Quality, Perform Quality Assurance, and Perform Quality Control. Prereq: MET CS 520 or 521. Or instructor's consent.   [ 4 cr. ]

Spring 2019
Section Type Instructor Location Days Times
O1 IND Elentukh ARR
Fall 2018
Section Type Instructor Location Days Times
C1 IND Elentukh KCB 102 W 6:00 pm – 8:45 pm
E1 IND Elentukh KCB 102 W 6:00 pm – 8:45 pm

This course provides students with a comprehensive overview of the principles, processes, and practices of agile software development. Students learn techniques for initiating, planning and executing on software development projects using agile methodologies. Students will obtain practical knowledge of agile development frameworks and be able to distinguish between agile and traditional project management methodologies. Students will learn how to apply agile tools and techniques in the software development lifecycle from project ideation to deployment, including establishing an agile team environment, roles and responsibilities, communication and reporting methods, and embracing change. We also leverage the guidelines outlined by the Project Management Institute for agile project development as a framework in this course.   [ 4 cr. ]

Spring 2019
Section Type Instructor Location Days Times
C1 IND W 6:00 pm – 8:45 pm
Fall 2018
Section Type Instructor Location Days Times
O2 IND Alt-Simmons ARR

The course provides a strong foundation in database security and auditing. This course utilizes Oracle scenarios and step-by-step examples. The following topics are covered: security, profiles, password policies, privileges and roles, Virtual Private Databases, and auditing. The course also covers advanced topics such as SQL injection, database management security issues such as securing the DBMS, enforcing access controls, and related issues. Prereq: MET CS 579 or MET CS 669; or instructor's consent.  [ 4 cr. ]

Spring 2019
Section Type Instructor Location Days Times
C1 IND Wolfe W 6:00 pm – 8:45 pm
E1 IND Wolfe W 6:00 pm – 8:45 pm
O2 IND ARR
Fall 2018
Section Type Instructor Location Days Times
A1 IND Ultrino CGS 423 M 6:00 pm – 8:45 pm
E1 IND Ultrino CGS 423 M 6:00 pm – 8:45 pm
O1 IND Carroll ARR

Students will learn major Python tools and techniques for data analysis. There are weekly assignments and mini projects on topics covered in class. These assignments will help build necessary statistical, visualization and other data science skills for effective use of data science in a variety of applications including finance, text processing, time series analysis and recommendation systems. In addition, students will choose a topic for a final project and present it on the last day of class. Prerequisite: MET CS 521 or equivalent. Or, instructor's consent.   [ 4 cr. ]

Section Type Instructor Location Days Times
C1 IND Pinsky COM 213 W 6:00 pm – 8:45 pm

This course enables IT professional leaders to identify emerging security risks and implement highly secure networks to support organizational goals. Discussion of methodologies for identifying, quantifying, mitigating and controlling risks. Students implement a comprehensive IT risk management plans (RMP) that identify alternate sites for processing mission-critical applications, and techniques to recover infrastructure, systems, networks, data and user access. The course also discusses related topics such as: disaster recovery, handling information security; protection of property, personnel and facilities; protection of sensitive and classified information, privacy issues, and criminal terrorist and hostile activities.  [ 4 cr. ]

Spring 2019
Section Type Instructor Location Days Times
D1 IND Burgoyne R 6:00 pm – 8:45 pm
E1 IND Burgoyne R 6:00 pm – 8:45 pm
BHA IND T 6:00 pm – 8:45 pm
Fall 2018
Section Type Instructor Location Days Times
D1 IND Burgoyne CAS 227 R 6:00 pm – 8:45 pm
O2 IND Pak ARR
BCL IND Rachamadugu ROOM S 8:30 am – 4:00 pm

This course will cover advanced network security issues and solutions. The main focus on the first part of the course will be on Security basics, i.e. security services, access controls, vulnerabilities, threats and risk, network architectures and attacks. In the second part of the course, particular focus and emphasis will be given to network security capabilities and mechanisms (Access Control on wire-line and wireless networks), IPsec, Firewalls, Deep Packet Inspection and Transport security. The final portion of the course will address Network Application security (Email, Ad-hoc, XML/SAML and Services Oriented Architecture security. As part of our course review we will explore a number of Network Use Cases. Prereq: MET CS 535 or MET CS 625; Familiarity with OSI and TCP/IP protocol stack; Background-familiarity with binary numbers, prime numbers, binary- hexadecimal-decimal conversions, etc; Familiarity with computer programming concepts; or instructor's consent.  [ 4 cr. ]

Spring 2019
Section Type Instructor Location Days Times
B1 IND Matthews T 6:00 pm – 8:45 pm
O1 IND Tis ARR
Fall 2018
Section Type Instructor Location Days Times
A1 IND Jacobs PSY B39 M 6:00 pm – 8:45 pm
E1 IND Jacobs PSY B39 M 6:00 pm – 8:45 pm

Provides a comprehensive understanding of digital forensics and investigation tools and techniques. Learn what computer forensics and investigation is as a profession and gain an understanding of the overall investigative process. Operating system architectures and disk structures are discussed. Studies how to set up an investigator's office and laboratory, as well as what computer forensic hardware and software tools are available. Other topics covered include importance of digital evidence controls and how to process crime and incident scenes, details of data acquisition, computer forensic analysis, e-mail investigations, image file recovery, investigative report writing, and expert witness requirements. Provides a range of laboratory and hands-on assignments either in solo or in teams. With rapid growth of computer systems and digital data this area has grown in importance. Prereq: Working knowledge of windows computers, including installing and removing software. Access to a PC meeting the minimum system requirements defined in the course syllabus.  [ 4 cr. ]

Spring 2019
Section Type Instructor Location Days Times
O2 IND ARR
Fall 2018
Section Type Instructor Location Days Times
C1 IND Arena CGS 113 W 6:00 pm – 8:45 pm
E1 IND Arena CGS 113 W 6:00 pm – 8:45 pm
O1 IND Navarro ARR

Overview of mobile forensics investigation techniques and tools. Topics include mobile forensics procedures and principles, related legal issues, mobile platform internals, bypassing passcode, rooting or jailbreaking process, logical and physical acquisition, data recovery and analysis, and reporting. Provides in-depth coverage of both iOS and Android platforms. Laboratory and hands-on exercises using current tools are provided and required.  [ 4 cr. ]

Section Type Instructor Location Days Times
A1 IND M 6:00 pm – 8:45 pm
E1 IND Zhang M 6:00 pm – 8:45 pm

The course provides an in-depth presentation of security issues in computer systems, networks, and applications. Formal security models are presented and illustrated on operating system security aspects, more specifically memory protection, access control and authentication, file system security, backup and recovery management, intrusion and virus protection mechanisms. Application level security focuses on language level security and various security policies; conventional and public keys encryption, authentication, message digest and digital signatures. Internet and intranet topics include security in IP, routers, proxy servers, and firewalls, application- level gateways, Web servers, file and mail servers. Discussion of remote access issues, such as dial-up servers, modems, VPN gateways and clients. Prereq: MET CS 535 or MET CS 625. Or instructor's consent.   [ 4 cr. ]

Spring 2019
Section Type Instructor Location Days Times
A1 IND Jacobs M 6:00 pm – 8:45 pm
D1 IND
E1 IND Jacobs M 6:00 pm – 8:45 pm
O1 IND Pak ARR
Fall 2018
Section Type Instructor Location Days Times
B1 IND Jacobs FLR 134 T 6:00 pm – 8:45 pm
E1 IND Jacobs FLR 134 T 6:00 pm – 8:45 pm
BCL IND Rachamadugu ROOM U 8:00 am – 3:30 pm
BHA IND Dyer ROOM W 6:00 pm – 8:45 pm

The goal of this course is to study basic concepts and techniques of data mining. The topics include data preparation, classification, performance evaluation, association rule mining, and clustering. We will discuss basic data mining algorithms in the class and students will practice data mining techniques using data mining software. Students will use Weka and SQL Server or Oracle. Prereq: MS CS Prerequisites: MET CS 579; or instructor's consent. MS CIS Prerequisites: MET CS 669 and MET CS 546; or instructor's consent.  [ 4 cr. ]

Spring 2019
Section Type Instructor Location Days Times
C1 IND Lee W 6:00 pm – 8:45 pm
E1 IND Lee W 6:00 pm – 8:45 pm
Fall 2018
Section Type Instructor Location Days Times
B1 IND Lee CGS 311 T 6:00 pm – 8:45 pm
C1 IND Lee EPC 205 W 6:00 pm – 8:45 pm
O2 IND Lee ARR

This course provides a comprehensive understanding of network forensic analysis principles. Within the context of forensics security, network infrastructures, topologies, and protocols are introduced. Students understand the relationship between network forensic analysis and network security technologies. Students will learn to identify network security incidents and potential sources of digital evidence and demonstrate the ability to perform basic network data acquisition and analysis using computer based applications and utilities. Students will also identify potential applications for the integration of network forensic technologies and demonstrate the ability to accurately document network forensic processes and analysis. Prereq: MET CS 625 and MET CS 695; or instructor's consent.  [ 4 cr. ]

Section Type Instructor Location Days Times
C1 IND Khasnabish CGS 115 W 6:00 pm – 8:45 pm
E1 IND Khasnabish CGS 115 W 6:00 pm – 8:45 pm

This course covers advanced aspects of database management systems including advanced normalization and denormalization, query optimization, object- oriented and object-relational databases, data warehousing, data mining, distributed databases, XML, XSL, and databases for web applications. There is extensive coverage of SQL and database instance tuning. Students learn about the advanced object- relational features in DBMS such as Oracle, including navigational query, BLOBs, abstract data types, and methods. Students learn about unstructured "big data" databases and gain hands-on experience with MongoDB and Spark, which are integrated into the course web site. Prereq: MET CS 579 or MET CS 669; or instructor's consent.   [ 4 cr. ]

Spring 2019
Section Type Instructor Location Days Times
D1 IND Polnar R 6:00 pm – 8:45 pm
E1 IND Polnar R 6:00 pm – 8:45 pm
O1 IND Polnar ARR
Fall 2018
Section Type Instructor Location Days Times
D1 IND Polnar PHO 203 R 6:00 pm – 8:45 pm

This course presents the details of information processing in hospitals, hospital information systems (HIS), and more broadly health information systems. It presents the architecture, design, and user requirements of information systems in health care environment. It focuses on Information Technology aspects of Health Informatics specifically addressing the design, development, operation, and management of HIS. The first part of this course covers the introductory concepts including information processing needs, and information management in health care environment. The second part covers detailed description of HIS including hospital process modeling, architecture, quality assessment, and applicable tools. The final part of the course covers management of HIS and related issues and extension of this topic to other health care organizations. The course will have a term project providing students a hands-on experience in design and research of HIS. Prereq: MET CS 580; or instructor's consent.  [ 4 cr. ]

Spring 2019
Section Type Instructor Location Days Times
O2 IND ARR
Fall 2018
Section Type Instructor Location Days Times
C1 IND Loughlin CGS 121 W 6:00 pm – 8:45 pm
E1 IND Loughlin CGS 121 W 6:00 pm – 8:45 pm

This course builds upon the strong technical foundation of our MSCIS and MSCS curricula, by providing students with the CIO-level management perspective and skills of an enterprise architect, in the context of the technologies that implement those architectures. Our Ross, Weil, and Robertson text provides much of the management content of the course, and the online and classroom content provide both management and technical skills. Students learn that enterprise architectures are best developed incrementally, by system development projects that are aligned with strategic goals and the enterprise architecture. The online content therefore includes many real enterprise system development case studies, showing how these enterprise systems contributed to and helped define the overall enterprise architecture. The course also includes a number of realistic enterprise architecture assignments and an incremental term project with components spanning the course, to provide students with hands on enterprise architecture experience. The course provides students with the understanding and skills needed to define and implement successful enterprise architectures that provide real value to organizations, such as substantially reducing IT costs while improving performance, agility and alignment of information technology to business goals. Prereq: MET CS 682. Or strategic IT experience. Or instructor's consent. 4 credits.  [ 4 cr. ]

Spring 2019
Section Type Instructor Location Days Times
D1 IND R 6:00 pm – 8:45 pm
E1 IND R 6:00 pm – 8:45 pm
O2 IND ARR
Fall 2018
Section Type Instructor Location Days Times
B1 IND Yates BRB 122 T 6:00 pm – 8:45 pm
E1 IND Yates BRB 122 T 6:00 pm – 8:45 pm

Master’s Thesis Option in Computer Information Systems

(8 credits)

Students majoring in Computer Information Systems may elect a thesis option, to be completed within twelve months. This option is available to Master of Science in Computer Information Systems candidates who have completed at least seven courses toward their degree and have a GPA of 3.7 or higher. Students are responsible for finding a thesis advisor and a principal reader within the department. The advisor must be a full-time faculty member; the principal reader may be part-time faculty with a PhD (unless waived by department).

This thesis must be completed within 12 months. Students majoring in Computer Science may elect a thesis option. This option is available to Master of Science in Computer Science candidates who have completed at least seven courses toward their degree and have a GPA of 3.7 or higher. Students are responsible for finding a thesis advisor and a principal reader within the department. The advisor must be a full-time faculty member; the principal reader may be part-time faculty member with a doctorate. Permission must be obtained by the department. 4cr.  [ 4 cr. ]

This thesis must be completed within 12 months. Students majoring in Computer Science may elect a thesis option. This option is available to Master of Science in Computer Science candidates who have completed at least seven courses toward their degree and have a GPA of 3.7 or higher. Students are responsible for finding a thesis advisor and a principal reader within the department. The advisor must be a full-time faculty member; the principal reader may be part-time faculty member with a doctorate. Permission must be obtained by the department. 4cr.  [ 4 cr. ]

View all Computer Science & IT graduate courses.