Grants

Current BU School of Social Work grants and funding.

Updated August 2017

Principal Investigator:  Bronwyn Keefe
Sponsor: Tufts Health Plan Foundation
Abstract: This project is focused on field/capacity building in the area of behavioral health through a partnership with Age Friendly New Bedford, in particular between the New Bedford Council on Aging and the Center for Aging and Disability Education and Research at Boston University School of Social Work. In keeping with Tuft’s goals of developing communities that are responsive to the needs of older adults, promote healthy living, and focus on the most vulnerable older adults, this program will build on the collaboration among organizations in New Bedford that led to its designation as an Age Friendly city. In order for older adults to be fully engaged in community life, behavioral health concerns need to be addressed with a focus on social isolation, depression, and substance use. Many Age Friendly efforts don’t address these issues even though significant numbers of older adults are impacted. This grant will focus on capacity building in behavioral health through the diverse partnerships that make up the Age Friendly New Bedford coalition.  

Principal Investigator: Thomas Byrne
Sponsor: Blue Cross Blue Shield Foundation
Abstract: The purpose of this project is to inform a data-based redesign of health care and housing systems for Medicaid beneficiaries who are chronically homeless and aged 55 or above. The project integrates data from the emergency shelter system in Massachusetts and Medicaid claims data to: (1) examine the health care utilization patterns and costs among Massachusetts residents aged 55 and above who experience chronic homelessness; (2) project the expected health care costs over the next decade for this population absent any effort to intervene to address their housing needs; and (3) estimate the potential reduction in health services use and return on investment associated with the large-scale implementation of a range of housing intervention models for this population. The results of this third aim will prove highly useful in developing a multi-state demonstration would implement and test the effectiveness of the most promising housing models.  


Principal Investigator: Ellen DeVoe
Sponsor: U.S. Department of Defense
Abstract: U.S. military service since the September 11th, 2001 terrorist attacks has placed tremendous demands on families. Approximately 43% of the Total Forces are parents and two million children have experienced parental deployment. Of these children, 42% are younger than five years during the deployment-separation period(s). The primary aim of this research is to examine the feasibility and efficacy of Strong Families Strong Forces, a parenting program designed to support families through the deployment cycle, with Active Duty service members and their families.

The research is being conducted by an interdisciplinary team at Boston University (Ellen DeVoe, Principal Investigator) and the RAND Corporation. The team will conduct a series of studies including a needs assessment related to parenting through the deployment cycle and a pilot-test of Strong Families at Ft. Hood. The final phase of the study includes a randomized clinical trial comparing the efficacy of Strong Families the intervention compared to a parent-focused self-care program (N=150 military families with young children). At the end of the trial, the investigators will analysis group differences in parenting stress, quality of parent-child relationships, co-parenting, and family and child well-being. 

The project also includes a cost-effectiveness analysis to compare the costs of achieving benefit from Strong Families and a prospective examination of co-parenting processes in military families across the deployment cycle. This study will be among the first to characterize these complex processes and can generate new and immediately applicable knowledge about parenting and co-parenting through wartime deployment cycles. 

Evidence-based parenting programs can support well-being among military parents and children, facilitate greater continuity in service member parents’ relationships with their young children, and facilitate positive reintegration for all family members. Click here for more information.  


Principal Investigator: Scott Miyake Geron
Co-Principal Investigator: Bronwyn Keefe 
Sponsor: Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI) via Massachusetts General Hospital  

 
Principal Investigator: Ernest Gonzales
Sponsor: Bridges Together, Inc.
Abstract: The goal of this study is to examine how an intergenerational program improves health among older adults; while potentially bolstering school readiness and reducing ageism among elementary children.  

 
Principal Investigator: Yoonsook Ha
Sponsor: Brandeis University via Comm. of Massachusetts/ Dept. of Early Education and Care via U.S. Admin. For Children and Families (ACF)  

 
Principal Investigator: Yoonsook Ha
Sponsor: DHHS via Brandeis University  

 
Principal Investigator: Yoonsook Ha
Sponsor: U.S. Admin. For Children and Families (ACF) via Commonwealth of Massachusetts  


Principal Investigator: Hyeouk Chris Hahm
Sponsor: NIH  


Principal Investigator: Bronwyn Keefe
Sponsor: Greater Lynn Senior Services, Inc. via Blue Cross Blue Shield Foundation
Abstract: Greater Lynn Senior Services, Inc. (GLSS) received funding from BCBSMA Foundation to fund the development and implementation of a robust evaluation framework for their Kiosk for Living Well program. The Kiosks are vibrant, mobile spaces embedded in community pulse-points that inspire consumers to participate in activities designed to promote healthier living routines, ranging from engaging self-assessments, educational and fun activities to health monitoring by appropriately and clinically trained staff around hypertension, stroke reduction, stress management, falls prevention, and depression. Consumers can connect with nurses, mobility counselors, social workers, community health workers, and advisors trained in problem solving supports to address the full range of health concerns and their social determinants. GLSS has subcontracted with BU to conduct this evaluation work.  

 
Principal Investigator: Bronwyn Keefe
Sponsor: Commonwealth of Massachusetts/Department of Public Health  


Principal Investigator: Bronwyn Keefe
Sponsor: Commonwealth of Massachusetts/Executive Office of Elder Affairs
Abstract: Description: This grant will improve the capacity of Massachusetts’ home and community-based service system to provide dementia-capable services and supports by providing advanced training to help home care staff identify individuals with dementia and provide services that promote independence and well-being, mitigate conflict and alleviate stress for families coping with dementia. Ultimately the training provided through this grant will have an impact on quality of life for thousands living with Alzheimer’s disease across the Commonwealth.  

 
Principal Investigator: Luz Marilis López
Sponsor: HRSA via Boston Medical Center  

 
Principal Investigator: Lena Lundgren
Sponsor: SAMHSA (Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration) 


Principal Investigator: Daniel P. Miller
Sponsor: U.S. Dept. of Agriculture via University of Kentucky
Abstract: The aim of this project (Taryn Morrissey, American University, Co-PI) is to use natural experiments created by state policy variation and the roll-out and staged clawback of expanded eligibility and benefits from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act to investigate the impacts of participation in the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) on child and adult health.

 
Principal Investigator: Daniel P. Miller
Sponsor: WT Grant Foundation
Abstract: Low-income children have far worse academic and behavioral outcomes than their more affluent peers. Research suggests that involvement by fathers can help improve these outcomes, but major social and economic changes have hampered low-income fathers’ ability to be involved with their children. To date, father involvement has been overlooked as a possible agent in reducing economic-based inequality in child outcomes, and research and programming have tended to focus on behavioral interventions, rarely considering the key policies that may shape fathering.  By analyzing data from multiple national surveys and qualitative interviews nested within one of these surveys, this study provides new insight into whether, and in which contexts, father involvement reduces economic-based inequality in children’s academic and behavioral outcomes.  It also provides the first systematic analysis of how social and economic policies may promote or hinder low-income fathers’ residence and involvement with children.

 
Principal Investigator: Jordana Muroff
Sponsor: SAMHSA  

 
Principal Investigator: Ruth Paris
Sponsor: Jewish Family and Children’s Services via the Sorenson Foundation  


Principal Investigator: Ruth Paris
Sponsor: Jewish Family and Children’s Services via SAMHSA  

 
Principal Investigator: Ruth Paris
Sponsor: SAMHSA via the Institute for Health and Recovery, Inc.  

 
Principal Investigator: Christopher P. Salas-Wright
Sponsor: NIH via BU Medical School  

 
Principal Investigator: Renée Spencer
Sponsor: WT Grant via Portland State University  

 
Principal Investigator: Renée Spencer
Sponsor: U.S. Office of Juvenile Justice & Delinquency Prevention (OJJDP) via the University of Massachusetts Boston  

 
Principal Investigator: Renée Spencer
Sponsor: U.S. Office of Juvenile Justice & Delinquency Prevention (OJJDP) via Portland State University  


Principal Investigator: Renée Spencer
Sponsor: U.S. Dept. of Education via University of Arkansas  

 
Principal Investigator: Linda Susan Sprague Martinez
Sponsor: Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI) via Center for Community Health Education Research and Service, Inc. (CCHERS)  


Principal Investigator: Linda Susan Sprague Martinez
Sponsor: Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI) via Boston Medical Center  


Principal Investigator: Linda Susan Sprague Martinez
Sponsor: NIH via Tufts University  


Principal Investigator: Geoffrey W. Wilkinson
Sponsor: Sanofi-Aventis, U.S., LLC  


Principal Investigator: Geoffrey W. Wilkinson
Sponsor: Sanofi-Aventis, U.S., LLC