Master of Science in Telecommunication

CNSS - LogoThe Master of Science (MS) in Telecommunication degree program integrates knowledge of the computer science, engineering, managerial, and legal aspects of networking and telecommunications. The telecommunication degree program is designed to provide knowledge and critical skills essential for success in this rapidly expanding field. Program participants gain a solid knowledge of the basic networking technologies, systems, and services; increase their ability to compare networking and telecommunication products and services; and enhance their ability to manage complex telecommunication projects.

Students who complete the master’s degree in Telecommunication will be able to demonstrate:

  • Advanced knowledge of data communication protocols and networks, including, but not limited to, error control and flow control, distributed synchronization, error detection and correction, forwarding and techniques to implement it, performance analysis of networks, and management of large networks.
  • Competence sufficient to design, specify, and develop data transfer protocols for specific purposes; design, specify, plan, and define networks of any size; and analyze, evaluate, and select network technologies.

Concentration in Security

Students may choose to pursue a concentration in Security.

Appreciating the converging nature of management skills and technology, the Computer Science Department has a special relationship with Metropolitan College’s Administrative Sciences and Actuarial Science departments. Degree candidates in either program may apply 8 credits from one degree toward a second degree in one of these disciplines, thereby reducing their work by two courses. Students must be accepted by both departments, but they may request that application materials such as references and transcripts be forwarded from the first program to the second.

Official transcripts of previous academic work, three letters of recommendation, personal statement, and résumé are required as part of the application.

A maximum of two graduate-level courses (8 credits) taken at Metropolitan College before acceptance into the program may be applied toward the degree.

Minimum passing grade for a course in the graduate program is C (2.0), but an average grade of B (3.0) must be maintained to be in good academic standing and satisfy the degree requirements.

Apply here.

Academic Standing

No grade lower than C may be used toward degree requirements. Students must maintain an overall grade point average of 3.0 in order to be in good academic standing and to graduate. Students with a grade point average of less than 3.0 are on academic probation and must be in a position to achieve a 3.0 within the 48 required credit hours for graduation.

Prerequisites

Applicants to the program are required to have a baccalaureate degree and proficiency in the following areas:

  • MET CS 201 Introduction to Programming
  • MET CS 231 Programming with C++ or
    MET CS 232 Programming with Java
  • MET CS 472 Computer Architecture
  • MET CS 546 Quantitative Methods for information Systems

A total of 40 credits is required.

Core Curriculum

(Six courses/24 credits)

This course provides a robust understanding of networking. It teaches the fundamentals of networking systems, their architecture, function and operation and how those fundamentals are reflected in current network technologies. Students will learn the principles that underlie all networks and the application of those principles (or not) to current network protocols and systems. The course explains how layers of different scope are combined to create a network. There will be a basic introduction to Physical Media, the functions that make up protocols, such as error detection, delimiting, lost and duplicate detection; and the synchronization required for the feedback mechanisms: flow and retransmission control, etc. Students will be introduced to how these functions are used in current protocols, such as Ethernet, WiFi, VLANs, TCP/IP, wireless communication, routing, congestion management, QoS, network management, security, and the common network applications as well as some past applications with unique design solutions. Prereq: MET CS 575 and MET CS 201 or MET CS 231 or MET CS 232. Or instructor's consent. Restrictions: This course may not be taken in conjunction with MET CS 625 or MET CS 425 (undergraduate). Only one of these courses can be counted towards degree requirements.  [ 4 cr. ]

Sum1 2017
Section Type Instructor Location Days Times
SC1 IND Day MCS B31 M 6:00 pm – 9:30 pm
Fall 2017
Section Type Instructor Location Days Times
D1 IND Day MCS B33 R 6:00 pm – 8:45 pm

Overview of operating system characteristics, design objectives, and structures. Topics include concurrent processes, coordination of asynchronous events, file systems, resource sharing, memory management, security, scheduling and deadlock problems.   [ 4 cr. ]

Sum1 2017
Section Type Instructor Location Days Times
SC1 IND Nourai CAS 208 T 6:00 pm – 9:30 pm
Fall 2017
Section Type Instructor Location Days Times
D1 IND Nourai CAS 428 R 6:00 pm – 8:45 pm

The purpose of this course is to provide students with a deeper understanding of Media-specific Technologies not only so that they will be able to use the ones covered in this course, but more importantly be able to analyze and evaluate new technologies. This course applies the principles from CS 535 to understand the engineering that lead to them as well as the special problems that confront network technologies that operate directly over the physical media. These Media specific layers have three problems to solve: the usual one of multiple users of a common resource, accommodating the particular characteristics of the media, and providing (to the degree possible) a media- independent service to the layers above. While CS 535 provides a high-level view of some of these technologies, in this course, they are considered in much greater detail as to how these technologies address their requirements and take advantage of the assumptions made. The emphasis is on those technologies that are either representative of a type or take a unique perspective on the problem. Hence, the traditional data link protocols, such as HDLC, modern Ethernet (primarily VLANs), WiFi (802.11) represent the first type, while media technologies, such as DOCSIS, RFIDs, IoT, and cellular mobile networks are representative of the second. The course will consider how these technologies solve mobility, routing, congestion, QoS (multi-media), security, etc. A major project is part of this course. Prereq: MET CS 231 or MET CS 232 and either MET CS 625 or MET CS 535; or instructor's consent.   [ 4 cr. ]

. This course will cover contemporary integrated network management based on FCAPS (Fault, Configuration, Administration, Performance, and Security management) model. The introduction to the course will be an overview of data transmission techniques and networking technologies. The middle part of the course will be on Network Management Model, SNMP versions 1, 2 and 3, and MIBs. In the second part of the course, particular focus and emphasis will be given to current network management issues: various wireless networks technologies (WLAN, WiFi, WiMax), Voice-over-IP, Peer-to-Peer Networks, networking services, Identity Management, and Services Oriented Architecture Management. Prereq: MET CS 535 or MET CS 625. or instructor's consent.  [ 4 cr. ]

Section Type Instructor Location Days Times
D1 IND Ellabidy CAS 227 R 6:00 pm – 8:45 pm

This course will cover advanced network security issues and solutions. The main focus on the first part of the course will be on Security basics, i.e. security services, access controls, vulnerabilities, threats and risk, network architectures and attacks. In the second part of the course, particular focus and emphasis will be given to network security capabilities and mechanisms (Access Control on wire-line and wireless networks), IPsec, Firewalls, Deep Packet Inspection and Transport security. The final portion of the course will address Network Application security (Email, Ad-hoc, XML/SAML and Services Oriented Architecture security. As part of our course review we will explore a number of Network Use Cases. Prereq: MET CS 535 or MET CS 625; Familiarity with OSI and TCP/IP protocol stack; Background-familiarity with binary numbers, prime numbers, binary- hexadecimal-decimal conversions, etc; Familiarity with computer programming concepts; or instructor's consent.  [ 4 cr. ]

Section Type Instructor Location Days Times
A1 IND Jacobs FLR 265 M 6:00 pm – 8:45 pm
E1 IND Jacobs FLR 265 M 6:00 pm – 8:45 pm

The purpose of this course is to provide a solid foundation for the networking practitioner. While CS 535 introduces the basic networking concepts, this course provides the deep understanding that the practitioner who may be developing or evaluating network products needs to know. Consequently, this course does a much 'deeper dive' into the topics that tend to be the most counter-intuitive such as naming and addressing, synchronization, congestion management and routing. Naming and addressing is the least understood topic in networking and the most important. This topic is not covered in any current textbooks. The student will explore why the necessary and sufficient condition for synchronization for reliable data transfer is to bound 3 timers and independent of message exchanges. This is not at all obvious and has deep implications for protocols. To engineer networks, it is important to understand the degree to which the behavior of error and flow control protocols can be modified and to what purposes. Congestion management is the second least understood topic in networking. The course emphasizes congestion avoidance as opposed to congestion control and explores the impact in different environments. Routing is the third least understood topic in networking. This course is most concerned with its role in resource allocation but also that "routing protocols" are really distributed database protocols. In addition, the course will consider the interactions among these topics and the necessity of keeping the system effects in perspective. Prereq: MET CS 535; or instructor's consent.   [ 4 cr. ]

Section Type Instructor Location Days Times
C1 IND Day STH 113 W 6:00 pm – 8:45 pm

Students who have completed courses on core curriculum subjects as part of their undergraduate degree program or have relevant work-related experience may request permission from the Department of Computer Science to replace the corresponding core courses with graduate-level computer science electives. Please refer to the MET CS Academic Policies Manual for further details.

General Electives

(Four courses/16 credits)

Students who are not pursuing a concentration in Security must select four general electives. Electives other than those listed below must be approved by the student’s advisor. Students should make sure that they have all prerequisites required by the selected course. At least two courses must be at the 600-level or above:

This course empowers students to reduce the energy use, waste, and other environmental impacts of IT systems while reducing life cycle costs, thereby improving competitive advantage. Students learn how to measure computer power usage, minimize power usage, procure sustainable hardware, design green data centers, recycle computer equipment, configure computers to minimize power, use virtualization to reduce the number of servers, and other green technologies. Students also learn how to make green IT an integral part of organizational culture and planning, to foster long-term sustainable information technology. The course is executed through a combination of lectures, guest lectures, field trips, assignments, labs, case studies, and a term project.   [ 4 cr. ]

In this course we will study the fundamental and design applications of various biometric systems based on fingerprints, voice, face, hand geometry, palm print, iris, retina, and other modalities. Multimodal biometric systems that use two or more of the above characteristics will be discussed. Biometric system performance and issues related to the security and privacy aspects of these systems will also be addressed.   [ 4 cr. ]

This course focuses on building core competencies in web design and development. It begins with a complete immersion into HTML essentially XHTML and Dynamic HTML (DHTML). Students are exposed to Cascading Style Sheets (CSS), as well as Dynamic CSS. The fundamentals of JavaScript language including object-oriented JavaScript is covered comprehensively. AJAX with XML and JSON are covered, as they are the primary means to transfer data from client and server. Prereq: For CIS Students: MET CS 200 Fundamentals of Information Technology, or instructor's consent. For CS and TC Students: MET CS 231 or MET CS 232, or instructor's consent.  [ 4 cr. ]

Sum1 2017
Section Type Instructor Location Days Times
SC1 IND Sheehan FLR 267 T 6:00 pm – 9:30 pm
SEL IND Sheehan FLR 267 T 6:00 pm – 9:30 pm
SO1 IND Bishop ARR
Fall 2017
Section Type Instructor Location Days Times
A1 IND Sheehan FLR 267 M 6:00 pm – 8:45 pm
E1 IND Sheehan FLR 267 M 6:00 pm – 8:45 pm
O1 IND Bishop ARR

This course provides students with a comprehensive overview of the principles, processes, and practices of software project management. Students learn techniques for planning, organizing, scheduling, and controlling software projects. There is substantial focus on software cost estimation and software risk management. Students will obtain practical project management skills and competencies related to the definition of a software project, establishment of project communications, managing project changes, and managing distributed software teams and projects.   [ 4 cr. ]

Sum1 2017
Section Type Instructor Location Days Times
SC1 IND Kanabar FLR 267 R 6:00 pm – 9:30 pm
SEL IND Kanabar FLR 267 R 6:00 pm – 9:30 pm
Fall 2017
Section Type Instructor Location Days Times
D1 IND Heda FLR 264 R 6:00 pm – 8:45 pm
E1 IND Heda FLR 264 R 6:00 pm – 8:45 pm
O1 IND Kanabar ARR

Theory and practice of security and quality assurance and testing for each step of the software development cycle. Verification vs. validation. Test case design techniques, test coverage criteria, security development and verification practices, and tools for static and dynamic analysis. Standards. Test-driven development. QA for maintenance and legacy applications. From a project management knowledge perspective, this course covers the methods, tools and techniques associated with the following processes -- Plan Quality, Perform Quality Assurance, and Perform Quality Control. Prereq: MET CS 520 or 521. Or instructor's consent.   [ 4 cr. ]

Section Type Instructor Location Days Times
C1 IND Elentukh FLR 264 W 6:00 pm – 8:45 pm
E1 IND Elentukh FLR 264 W 6:00 pm – 8:45 pm

Study of the ideas and techniques that enable computers to behave intelligently. Search, constraint propagations, and reasoning. Knowledge representation, natural language, learning, question answering, inference, visual perception, and/or problem solving. Laboratory course. Prereq: MET CS 248 and MET CS 341 or MET CS 342; or instructor's consent.  [ 4 cr. ]

Section Type Instructor Location Days Times
D1 IND Belyaev CAS B06B R 6:00 pm – 8:45 pm

This course enables IT professional leaders to identify emerging security risks and implement highly secure networks to support organizational goals. Discussion of methodologies for identifying, quantifying, mitigating and controlling risks. Students implement a comprehensive IT risk management plans (RMP) that identify alternate sites for processing mission-critical applications, and techniques to recover infrastructure, systems, networks, data and user access. The course also discusses related topics such as: disaster recovery, handling information security; protection of property, personnel and facilities; protection of sensitive and classified information, privacy issues, and criminal terrorist and hostile activities.  [ 4 cr. ]

Sum1 2017
Section Type Instructor Location Days Times
BHA IND Wolfe W 6:00 pm – 9:30 pm
SO1 IND Burgoyne ARR
Fall 2017
Section Type Instructor Location Days Times
D1 IND Burgoyne FLR 265 R 6:00 pm – 8:45 pm
E1 IND Burgoyne FLR 265 R 6:00 pm – 8:45 pm
O1 IND Pak ARR

Provides a comprehensive understanding of digital forensics and investigation tools and techniques. Learn what computer forensics and investigation is as a profession and gain an understanding of the overall investigative process. Operating system architectures and disk structures are discussed. Studies how to set up an investigator's office and laboratory, as well as what computer forensic hardware and software tools are available. Other topics covered include importance of digital evidence controls and how to process crime and incident scenes, details of data acquisition, computer forensic analysis, e-mail investigations, image file recovery, investigative report writing, and expert witness requirements. Provides a range of laboratory and hands-on assignments either in solo or in teams. With rapid growth of computer systems and digital data this area has grown in importance. Prereq: Working knowledge of windows computers, including installing and removing software. Access to a PC meeting the minimum system requirements defined in the course syllabus.  [ 4 cr. ]

Sum1 2017
Section Type Instructor Location Days Times
SEL IND Nourai FLR 109 S 1:00 pm – 4:00 pm
Fall 2017
Section Type Instructor Location Days Times
E1 IND Arena FLR 109 S 9:00 am – 12:00 pm
O1 IND Navarro ARR

Overview of mobile forensics investigation techniques and tools. Topics include mobile forensics procedures and principles, related legal issues, mobile platform internals, bypassing passcode, rooting or jailbreaking process, logical and physical acquisition, data recovery and analysis, and reporting. Provides in-depth coverage of both iOS and Android platforms. Laboratory and hands-on exercises using current tools are provided and required.  [ 4 cr. ]

Section Type Instructor Location Days Times
SO1 IND Zhang ARR

The course provides an in-depth presentation of security issues in computer systems, networks, and applications. Formal security models are presented and illustrated on operating system security aspects, more specifically memory protection, access control and authentication, file system security, backup and recovery management, intrusion and virus protection mechanisms. Application level security focuses on language level security and various security policies; conventional and public keys encryption, authentication, message digest and digital signatures. Internet and intranet topics include security in IP, routers, proxy servers, and firewalls, application- level gateways, Web servers, file and mail servers. Discussion of remote access issues, such as dial-up servers, modems, VPN gateways and clients. Prereq: MET CS 625; or instructor's consent.  [ 4 cr. ]

Section Type Instructor Location Days Times
B1 IND Jacobs FLR 264 T 6:00 pm – 8:45 pm
E1 IND Jacobs FLR 264 T 6:00 pm – 8:45 pm

Data mining and investigation is a key goal behind any data warehouse effort. The course provides an introduction to concepts behind data mining, text mining, and web mining. Algorithms will be tested on data sets using the Weka Data mining software and Microsoft SQL Server 2005 (Business Intelligence Development Studio). Prereq: MS CS Prerequisites: MET CS 579; or instructor's consent. MS CIS Prerequisites: MET CS 669 and MET CS 546; or instructor's consent.  [ 4 cr. ]

Sum1 2017
Section Type Instructor Location Days Times
SO1 IND Lee ARR
Fall 2017
Section Type Instructor Location Days Times
D1 IND Lee FLR 267 R 6:00 pm – 8:45 pm
E1 IND Lee FLR 267 R 6:00 pm – 8:45 pm
O1 IND Lee ARR

The Rich Internet Application (RIA) Development course concentrates primarily on building rich client web applications in the browser for desktop and mobile devices. The course is divided into various modules covering in depth the following technologies: HTML5, AngularJS, and Ionic framework. Along with the fundamentals underlying these technologies, several applications will be showcased as case studies. Students work with these technologies starting with simple applications and then examining real world complex applications. At the end of this course, students would have mastered the latest and widely used RIA methodologies. Course Prerequisites: METCS520 (Information Structures) and METCS601 (Web Application Development), or instructor's consent.  [ 4 cr. ]

Section Type Instructor Location Days Times
A1 IND Staff FLR 264 M 6:00 pm – 8:45 pm
E1 IND Staff FLR 264 M 6:00 pm – 8:45 pm

This course provides a comprehensive understanding of network forensic analysis principles. Within the context of forensics security, network infrastructures, topologies, and protocols are introduced. Students understand the relationship between network forensic analysis and network security technologies. Students will learn to identify network security incidents and potential sources of digital evidence and demonstrate the ability to perform basic network data acquisition and analysis using computer based applications and utilities. Students will also identify potential applications for the integration of network forensic technologies and demonstrate the ability to accurately document network forensic processes and analysis. Prereq: MET CS 625 and MET CS 695; or instructor's consent.  [ 4 cr. ]

Section Type Instructor Location Days Times
E1 IND Khasnabish FLR 109 S 1:00 pm – 4:00 pm

This course provides an introduction to the advanced digital forensic topic relating to malicious software (malware), which represents an increasing information security threat to computer systems and networks. Students will review software engineering design fundamentals and reverse engineering techniques utilized to conduct static and dynamic forensic analysis on computer systems and networks. Students will learn about the importance of forensic principles, legal considerations, digital evidence controls, and documentation of forensic procedures. This course will incorporate demonstrations and laboratory exercises to reinforce practical applications of course instruction and will require an independent research paper related to the course topic. Prereq: MET CS 693 and MET CS 703; or instructor's consent.  [ 4 cr. ]

This course builds upon the strong technical foundation of our MSCIS and MSCS curricula, by providing students with the CIO-level management perspective and skills of an enterprise architect, in the context of the technologies that implement those architectures. Our Ross, Weil, and Robertson text provides much of the management content of the course, and the online and classroom content provide both management and technical skills. Students learn that enterprise architectures are best developed incrementally, by system development projects that are aligned with strategic goals and the enterprise architecture. The online content therefore includes many real enterprise system development case studies, showing how these enterprise systems contributed to and helped define the overall enterprise architecture. The course also includes a number of realistic enterprise architecture assignments and an incremental term project with components spanning the course, to provide students with hands on enterprise architecture experience. The course provides students with the understanding and skills needed to define and implement successful enterprise architectures that provide real value to organizations, such as substantially reducing IT costs while improving performance, agility and alignment of information technology to business goals. Prereq: MET CS 682. Or strategic IT experience. Or instructor's consent. 4 credits.  [ 4 cr. ]

Sum1 2017
Section Type Instructor Location Days Times
SC1 IND Faktorovich MCS B23 W 6:00 pm – 9:30 pm
Fall 2017
Section Type Instructor Location Days Times
B1 IND Nizzari FLR 265 T 6:00 pm – 8:45 pm
E1 IND Nizzari FLR 265 T 6:00 pm – 8:45 pm

The course covers the main concepts and principles of cryptography with the main emphasis put on public key cryptography. It begins with the review of integers and a thorough coverage of the fundamentals of finite group theory followed by the RSA and ElGamal ciphers. Primitive roots in cyclic groups and the discrete log problem are discussed. Baby-step Giant-step and the Index Calculus probabilistic algorithms to compute discrete logs in cyclic groups are presented. Naor -- Reingold and Blum -- Blum -- Shub Random Number Generators as well as Fermat, Euler and Miller-Rabin primality tests are thoroughly covered. Pollard's Rho, Pollard's and Quadratic Sieve factorization algorithms are presented. The course ends with the coverage of some oblivious transfer protocols and zero-knowledge proofs. There are numerous programming assignments in the course. Prereq: MET CS 248 and MET CS 566; or instructor's consent.  [ 4 cr. ]

Section Type Instructor Location Days Times
A1 IND Temkin CGS 515 M 6:00 pm – 8:45 pm
BHA IND Pascoe M 6:00 pm – 8:45 pm

Prereq: Consent of advisor. Requires prior approval of student-initiated proposal. Independent study on special projects under faculty guidance.   [ Var cr. ]

Prereq: consent of the instructor. Requires prior approval of student-initiated proposal. Independent study on special projects under faculty guidance. variable cr  [ Var cr. ]

This course builds on the material covered in CS 789 Cryptography. It begins with the coverage of commutative rings, finite fields, rings of polynomials, and finding of the greatest common divisor in the ring of polynomials. Irreducible polynomials are discussed. Field extensions and fields Fᴩ [x]/P are thoroughly covered. The main emphasis is put on elliptic curves over Fᴩ and F₂ and the ElGamal cipher on elliptic curves is presented. Block ciphers DES and double and triple DES are introduced. AES and WHIRLPOOL block ciphers and modes of operation are covered. The course continues with the introduction of message integrity and message authentication. In the last part of the course cryptographic hash functions SHA-512 and WHIRLPOOL as well as various digital signatures are introduced. Finally, entity authentication and key management issues are discussed. Prereq: MET CS 789; or instructor's consent.  [ 4 cr. ]

Master’s Thesis in Telecommunication

(8 credits)

Students majoring in Telecommunication may elect a thesis option, to be completed within twelve months. This option is available to Master of Science in Telecommunication candidates who have completed at least seven courses toward their degree and have a GPA of 3.7 or higher. Students are responsible for finding a thesis advisor and a principal reader within the department. The advisor must be a full-time faculty member; the principal reader may be part-time faculty with a PhD (unless waived by the department).

This thesis must be completed within 12 months. Students majoring in Computer Science may elect a thesis option. This option is available to Master of Science in Computer Science candidates who have completed at least seven courses toward their degree and have a GPA of 3.7 or higher. Students are responsible for finding a thesis advisor and a principal reader within the department. The advisor must be a full-time faculty member; the principal reader may be part-time faculty member with a doctorate. Permission must be obtained by the department. 4cr.  [ 4 cr. ]

This thesis must be completed within 12 months. Students majoring in Computer Science may elect a thesis option. This option is available to Master of Science in Computer Science candidates who have completed at least seven courses toward their degree and have a GPA of 3.7 or higher. Students are responsible for finding a thesis advisor and a principal reader within the department. The advisor must be a full-time faculty member; the principal reader may be part-time faculty member with a doctorate. Permission must be obtained by the department. 4cr.  [ 4 cr. ]

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