Bicknell Lecture 2015

Wednesday, October 21, 2015

10 a.m.–1 p.m.
72 East Concord Street
Hiebert Lounge
Live-Streaming Available During Event

Free and open to the public.

In memory of Dr. William J. Bicknell, founder and chair emeritus of the Department of Global Health.

Should the Mission of Public Health Be the Eradication of Poverty?

Questions: keatingm@bu.edu

Speaker

Sheldon H. Danziger

President, Russell Sage Foundation

Sheldon H. Danziger is the president of the Russell Sage Foundation. Previously he was the Henry J. Meyer Distinguished University Professor of Public Policy at the Gerald R. Ford School of Public Policy, Research Professor at the Population Studies Center, and director of the National Poverty Center at the University of Michigan. He is a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and a John Kenneth Galbraith Fellow of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, and has been a John Simon Guggenheim Foundation Fellow and a visiting scholar at the Russell Sage Foundation and at the Rockefeller Foundation’s Bellagio Center. Between 1989 and 2013, Danziger directed the Research and Training Program on Poverty and Public Policy at the University of Michigan, a training and mentorship program for developing the careers of emerging scholars from underrepresented groups.

Three of Danziger’s books have been selected as Noteworthy Books in Industrial Relations and Labor Economics by Princeton University’s Industrial Relations Section: The Price of Independence: The Economics of Early Adulthood (co-edited with Cecilia Rouse, Russell Sage Foundation, 2007); Working and Poor: How Economic Conditions and Policy Changes Affect Low-Wage Workers (co-edited with Rebecca Blank and Robert Schoeni, Russell Sage Foundation, 2006); and America Unequal, co-authored with Peter Gottschalk (Harvard University Press and Russell Sage Foundation, 1995). Other books include Detroit Divided, co-authored with Reynolds Farley and Harry Holzer (Russell Sage Foundation, 2000), Changing Poverty, Changing Policies (co-edited with Maria Cancian, Russell Sage Foundation, 2009), and Legacies of the War on Poverty (co-edited with Martha Bailey, Russell Sage Foundation, 2013).

Panelists

Charles E. Carter

Chief Strategy Officer at the Center on the Developing Child at Harvard University

Charles E. Carter PhD, LICSW is the deputy director and chief strategy officer of the Center on the Developing Child. He is responsible for leading the creation of a strategy that leverages the Center’s R&D platform to build and scale an innovation movement beyond the center. Additionally, he is responsible for using outcome data to drive strategic decision-making and for building the capacity of individuals, organizations, and systems to drive and scale innovation on the ground.

Carter has more than 20 years of experience working with low-income children and families. Previously, he was the senior vice president and chief operating officer at the Crittenton Women’s Union (CWU). At CWU, he combined strategy with on-the-ground implementation to develop, lead, evaluate, and refine innovative anti-poverty programming to support low-income women’s efforts to become economically self-sufficient. Prior to joining CWU, he was director of the Child Welfare Institute at Salem State University, a regional director for the Massachusetts Behavioral Health Partnership, a child- and youth-focused network director at the Home for Little Wanderers, and a senior clinical consultant with Wediko Children’s Services.

Carter has taught on subjects that include cultural diversity, leadership, and measuring impact as a guest lecturer at the Graduate School of Education at Harvard University, the Graduate Schools of Management and Social Work at Simmons College, the New England Conservatory with the El Sistema Fellowship Program, and the Graduate School of Social Work at Boston College. He earned his master’s degree in social work from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and his PhD in social work from Boston College.

Molly Baldwin

Founder and CEO of Roca Inc.

Molly Baldwin is the founder and chief executive officer of Roca Inc. A graduate of UMass Amherst, Baldwin began her professional life as a street worker and community organizer, and soon founded Roca in 1988. For more than 25 years, she has been a tireless advocate, mentor, and community convener, reaching out to the highest-risk young people from our area’s most dangerous urban communities, and bringing together the major institutions, corporations, and agencies that affect these young people’s lives. Her five-foot-three stature belies her magnanimous presence—with the help of engaged institutions and a committed team of youth workers, Baldwin’s efforts at Roca have helped more than 25,000 young people make positive and profound changes in their lives. Today, Roca intensively reaches out to more than 700 participants each year, operating on the singular belief that, with the right help, people can change in spite of seemingly insurmountable circumstances. Baldwin has been the recipient of numerous regional and national awards and was recognized as one of the Boston Globe’s Top 100 Innovators for 2013. She holds a master’s degree in education from Lesley University and an honorary PhD from Salem State University.

Perri Klass

Director of the Arthur L. Carter Institute of Journalism at New York University

Perri Klass MD has been writing as a medical journalist dating back to her years as a student at Harvard Medical School in the 1980s, when she published a series of essays reflections on medical training in the “Hers” column of The New York Times. Since that time, she has published her medical journalism in many newspapers and magazines, including The New York Times, The New York Times Magazine, the Washington Post, the Boston Globe, The New England Journal of Medicine, Esquire, Parenting, and Vogue. She has written regular columns about medicine for Discover Magazine, American Health, Massachusetts Medicine, and Diversion. Her essays about medicine and medical training have been collected in the books A Not Entirely Benign Procedure: Four Years as a Medical Student (1987), and Baby Doctor: A Pediatrician’s Training (1992). At NYU, Klass is a professor both in journalism and in pediatrics.

Klass is particularly interested in issues of medicine and ethics, infectious disease, and pediatrics and literacy. She also writes regularly about travel, food, parenting, and knitting. She is the recipient of a James Beard Journalism Award for magazine writing on diet, nutrition, and health, a Virtual Mentor Award from the American Medical Association, and an Honors Award from the New England Chapter of the American Medical Writers Association, along with five O. Henry Awards for her short fiction. She has frequently lectured on medicine and writing, including commencement addresses at many medical schools. Her role as a medical journalist was recently featured in the National Library of Medicine exhibit on “Changing the Face of Medicine: Celebrating America’s Women Physicians at the National Institutes of Health.” She received her AB from Harvard in 1979, her MD from Harvard Medical School in 1986, completed her residency in pediatrics at Children’s Hospital, Boston, in 1989, her fellowship in pediatric infectious diseases at Boston City Hospital in 1992, and practiced pediatrics at an urban health care clinic in Boston for 12 years. As the medical director of Reach Out and Read, a national literacy program, she has trained physicians around the country on how to integrate books and advice about reading aloud into pediatrics. She has taught science writing at Harvard University, and has served as chair of the executive board of PEN New England.

Klass is the author of three novels—The Mystery of Breathing (2004), Other Women’s Children (1990), and Recombinations (1985)—and two collections of short stories—Love and Modern Medicine (2001) and I Am Having an Adventure (1986). Her other books include Quirky Kids: Understanding and Helping Your Child Who Doesn’t Fit In (coauthored with Eileen Costello MD, 2003) and Every Mother Is A Daughter (coauthored with Sheila Solomon Klass, 2006).