Master of Science in Actuarial Science

The Master of Science (MS) in Actuarial Science gives you the skills to become a successful actuary. You’ll gain a solid academic foundation through specialized courses in actuarial science, statistics, finance, and related fields. You will also benefit from practical exposure to business and economic principles. We offer the opportunity for you to understand the fiscal and ethical dilemmas often encountered in the process of business decision-making.

Students who complete the master’s degree in Actuarial Science will be able to demonstrate:

    • A detailed knowledge of the mathematics and statistics that form the core of actuarial calculations. This knowledge includes topics in probability, financial mathematics and derivatives, life contingencies, and loss modeling, with an emphasis on precision and accuracy.
    • Proficiency in distinguishing and describing, in depth, many actuarial practice areas, and an understanding of the principles that govern the development of insurance products for those areas, including emerging trends.
    • The computer skills required to analyze data using the most current software tools employed by insurance industry leaders.

      Read an article in the New England Journal of Higher Education, “Quants at the Gate: The Unique Education of Actuaries,” by Metropolitan College Dean Jay A. Halfond and Chair of Actuarial Science Lois K. Horwitz.

      Concentrations

      Students in the MS in Actuarial Science program may select one of two concentrations:

      • Insurance
      • Mathematical Finance

      Extra!

      What does an actuary do, exactly? Find out more about this well-paying profession. Read all about it »

      What does an actuary do?

      Actuaries use quantitative skills to analyze data from the past and present, in order to predict the future and help others make prudent and intelligent financial decisions. Using mathematics, statistics, and financial theory, actuaries define the financial impact of uncertain events—from catastrophes to rates of mortality, disability, and fertility—allowing businesses to adjust their long-term management strategies accordingly. Actuaries work for life, health, and property/casualty insurance companies, as well as for consulting firms, government agencies, accounting firms, industrial corporations, banks, and financial services companies.

      Preparation for Professional Examinations

      The actuarial science degree program will prepare you for the Society of Actuaries (SOA) and Casualty Actuarial Society (CAS) professional qualifying examinations, which are the points of entry for a successful actuarial career. The middle digit of the three-digit course codes approximately refers to the examination course number administered by the Society of Actuaries (SOA) and Casualty Actuarial Society (CAS).

      Dual Degree Option

      In appreciation of the converging nature of management skills and technology, the Actuarial Science department collaborates with Metropolitan College’s departments of Administrative Sciences and Computer Science. Degree candidates in any of these programs may apply 8 credits from one degree toward a second degree in one of these disciplines, thereby reducing their work by two courses. Students must be accepted by both departments, but they may request that application materials such as references and transcripts be forwarded from the first program to the second.

      Admission Information

      To satisfy the admission requirements for the Master of Science in Actuarial Science degree program, applicants must:

      1. Have a bachelor’s degree
      2. Have completed two semesters of calculus equivalent to MET MA 123 and 124 and one semester of multivariable calculus equivalent to MET MA 225
      3. Submit the results of the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) exam (international students only)

      Any applicant with deficiencies in the requirements may be admitted on a provisional basis. Such prerequisite courses must be fulfilled prior to other courses.

      In certain cases, the Admissions Committee may request an applicant to submit official scores from the Graduate Record Exam (GRE) or the Graduate Management Admissions Test (GMAT).

      International Applicants

      Applicants whose native language is not English, and who have not received a degree from an institution where the primary language of instruction is English, should submit a TOEFL score. For current information on the TOEFL examination, please visit www.ets.org/toefl. The TOEFL institution score for Boston University Metropolitan College graduate programs is 9034.

      Foreign students with a low TOEFL score may be admitted to the program subject to an English program offered through the Boston University Center for English Language & Orientation Programs (CELOP).

      To allow for processing time, applicants requiring student visas must submit completed application materials and International Students & Scholars Office (ISSO) forms at least six weeks prior to the start of the semester.

      International applicants must submit the following materials:

      • Score from Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL), directly mailed from the Educational Testing Service (ETS)
      • Authorized financial statement from a bank (original, shown in U.S. dollars)
      • Copy of current I-20 and I-94, both sides (if applicable)
      • Letter of financial support from sponsor (firm, government, parents, etc.)
      • Notarized English translations of all documents not in English

      Degree Requirements

      A total of 43 credits is required.

      In addition to a computer laboratory course (MET AT 602), a minimum of 40 credits at the 500-level or above is required. All required courses are selected from the following lists of core required courses and core elective courses.

      Core Required Courses

      Concentration in Insurance

      (Six courses/23 credits)

      MET AT 602 Laboratory for Actuarial and Financial Data Analysis II
      Sprg ‘14
      Fall ‘14

      A more in-depth seminar than AT 601, covering the same topics in greater detail. Ten sessions.  [ 3 cr. ]

      Spring 2014
      Section Type Instructor Location Days Times
      F1 IND Patashnick FLR 264 S 9:30 am – 12:30 pm
      Fall 2014
      Section Type Instructor Location Days Times
      F1 IND Creegan FLR 264 S 9:30 am – 12:30 pm
      F2 IND Patashnick FLR 264 S 1:30 pm – 4:30 pm
      MET AT 721 Mathematics of Compound Interest
      Sprg ‘14
      Fall ‘14

      This course develops uses of interest as it relates to the theory of finance. It will develop an understanding of interest calculations as they relate to bonds, mortgages, annuities under continuous and discrete payment schemes, and for instruments with non-level payment schemes.   [ 4 cr. ]

      Spring 2014
      Section Type Instructor Location Days Times
      B1 IND Silverman FLR 133 T 6:00 pm – 9:00 pm
      Fall 2014
      Section Type Instructor Location Days Times
      A1 IND Maycotte KCB 102 M 6:00 pm – 9:00 pm
      B1 IND Horwitz FLR 121 TR 3:30 pm – 5:00 pm
      MET AT 722 Finance for Actuaries
      Sprg ‘14
      Fall ‘14

      This course covers basic models and tools of corporate finance. Topics include net present value valuation, internal rate of return and profitability index models, capital budgeting models and efficient market hypotheses. These tools will be used to understand and apply basic principles of option pricing theory, including the Black-Scholes formula with application to binomial lattice valuation.  [ 4 cr. ]

      Spring 2014
      Section Type Instructor Location Days Times
      A1 IND Horwitz FLR 122 MW 3:30 pm – 5:00 pm
      D1 IND Horwitz FLR 133 R 6:00 pm – 9:00 pm
      Fall 2014
      Section Type Instructor Location Days Times
      B1 IND Staffier FLR 133 T 6:00 pm – 9:00 pm
      MET AT 731 Actuarial Mathematics I
      Sprg ‘14

      This course covers the fundamental principals of actuarial science. It begins with a discussion of survival models, including the functions that define them and special cases. A comparison is made between discrete and continuous models. Topics in the actuarial aspects of insurance will be covered, as will determination of annuities. Finally, the course will discuss the methodology of calculation of premiums. For all these topics, a basic framework will be presented, then more sophisticated models will be developed.   [ 4 cr. ]

      Section Type Instructor Location Days Times
      A1 IND Tepfer FLR 134 M 6:00 pm – 9:00 pm
      MET AT 741 Actuarial Statistics I
      Fall ‘14

      This course covers distributions of the size and frequency of insurance claims. Topics include empirical estimation, parametric estimation, Bayesian estimation, models for incomplete data, and evaluation of estimation processes. It also includes modeling problems that arise from truncation and modification at zero, compound frequency, as well as the interaction of frequency with severity and exposure. The course emphasizes applications of statistical principles in actuarial models and modeling.   [ 4 cr. ]

      Section Type Instructor Location Days Times
      D1 IND Tepfer SMG 220 R 6:00 pm – 9:00 pm
      MET AT 743 Regression and Time Series
      Sprg ‘14

      Prereq: CAS MA 582 or MET MA 582 Mathematical Statistics consent of instructor. Part I of this course will cover simple and multiple regressions, serial correlation and heteroscedasticity, analysis of residuals, and stepwise analysis techniques. Part II will cover time series analysis including smoothing and extrapolation of time series, linear time series models, model building procedure, and forecasting, as well as case studies.  [ 4 cr. ]

      Section Type Instructor Location Days Times
      C1 IND Ginovyan CAS 201 W 6:00 pm – 9:00 pm

      Concentration in Mathematical Finance

      (Six courses/23 credits)

      MET AT 602 Laboratory for Actuarial and Financial Data Analysis II
      Sprg ‘14
      Fall ‘14

      A more in-depth seminar than AT 601, covering the same topics in greater detail. Ten sessions.  [ 3 cr. ]

      Spring 2014
      Section Type Instructor Location Days Times
      F1 IND Patashnick FLR 264 S 9:30 am – 12:30 pm
      Fall 2014
      Section Type Instructor Location Days Times
      F1 IND Creegan FLR 264 S 9:30 am – 12:30 pm
      F2 IND Patashnick FLR 264 S 1:30 pm – 4:30 pm
      MET AT 721 Mathematics of Compound Interest
      Sprg ‘14
      Fall ‘14

      This course develops uses of interest as it relates to the theory of finance. It will develop an understanding of interest calculations as they relate to bonds, mortgages, annuities under continuous and discrete payment schemes, and for instruments with non-level payment schemes.   [ 4 cr. ]

      Spring 2014
      Section Type Instructor Location Days Times
      B1 IND Silverman FLR 133 T 6:00 pm – 9:00 pm
      Fall 2014
      Section Type Instructor Location Days Times
      A1 IND Maycotte KCB 102 M 6:00 pm – 9:00 pm
      B1 IND Horwitz FLR 121 TR 3:30 pm – 5:00 pm
      MET AT 722 Finance for Actuaries
      Sprg ‘14
      Fall ‘14

      This course covers basic models and tools of corporate finance. Topics include net present value valuation, internal rate of return and profitability index models, capital budgeting models and efficient market hypotheses. These tools will be used to understand and apply basic principles of option pricing theory, including the Black-Scholes formula with application to binomial lattice valuation.  [ 4 cr. ]

      Spring 2014
      Section Type Instructor Location Days Times
      A1 IND Horwitz FLR 122 MW 3:30 pm – 5:00 pm
      D1 IND Horwitz FLR 133 R 6:00 pm – 9:00 pm
      Fall 2014
      Section Type Instructor Location Days Times
      B1 IND Staffier FLR 133 T 6:00 pm – 9:00 pm
      MET AT 731 Actuarial Mathematics I
      Sprg ‘14

      This course covers the fundamental principals of actuarial science. It begins with a discussion of survival models, including the functions that define them and special cases. A comparison is made between discrete and continuous models. Topics in the actuarial aspects of insurance will be covered, as will determination of annuities. Finally, the course will discuss the methodology of calculation of premiums. For all these topics, a basic framework will be presented, then more sophisticated models will be developed.   [ 4 cr. ]

      Section Type Instructor Location Days Times
      A1 IND Tepfer FLR 134 M 6:00 pm – 9:00 pm
      MET AT 761 Mathematics for Investment and Portfolio Theory
      Fall ‘14

      This course covers the risk and return characteristics of primary financial products, fundamental principles of modern portfolio theory, term structures and yield curves, Markowitz Portfolio Selection Model, CAPM and its applications to portfolio management, derivative securities, duration, immunization, and interest rate risk management.   [ 4 cr. ]

      Section Type Instructor Location Days Times
      B1 IND Urciuoli SHA 202 T 6:00 pm – 9:00 pm
      MET AT 762 Mathematical Finance for Actuarial Science
      Sprg ‘14

      This course covers the analysis of derivative products and their use in insurance and risk management strategies. It covers selected aspects of rational valuation of derivative products like put-call parity, binomial option, and Black Scholes option pricing model. 4cr.   [ 4 cr. ]

      Section Type Instructor Location Days Times
      B1 IND Patashnick FLR 122 TR 3:30 pm – 5:00 pm
      D1 IND Gao EOP 274 R 6:00 pm – 9:00 pm

      Core Electives

      A total of five courses (20 credits) is required:

      MET AT 732 Actuarial Mathematics II
      Fall ‘14

      This course builds on the topics developed in MET AT 731. Insurance Reserves are introduced, and methods for determining reserves are studied. The course covers multiple life functions and multiple decrement functions. The latter part of the course focuses on ruin models.   [ 4 cr. ]

      Section Type Instructor Location Days Times
      A1 IND Tepfer SMG 220 M 6:00 pm – 9:00 pm
      MET AT 741 Actuarial Statistics I
      Fall ‘14

      This course covers distributions of the size and frequency of insurance claims. Topics include empirical estimation, parametric estimation, Bayesian estimation, models for incomplete data, and evaluation of estimation processes. It also includes modeling problems that arise from truncation and modification at zero, compound frequency, as well as the interaction of frequency with severity and exposure. The course emphasizes applications of statistical principles in actuarial models and modeling.   [ 4 cr. ]

      Section Type Instructor Location Days Times
      D1 IND Tepfer SMG 220 R 6:00 pm – 9:00 pm
      MET AT 742 Actuarial Statistics II
      Sprg ‘14

      This course covers: compound model for aggregate claims; credibility theory, including the Buhlmann-Straub credibility model; and empirical Baysian methods. Also included are process models for insurance, discrete, and finite-time ruin probabilities. The course emphasizes applications of statistical principles in actuarial models and modeling.  [ 4 cr. ]

      Section Type Instructor Location Days Times
      B1 IND Tepfer SMG 228 T 6:00 pm – 9:00 pm
      MET AT 743 Regression and Time Series
      Sprg ‘14

      Prereq: CAS MA 582 or MET MA 582 Mathematical Statistics consent of instructor. Part I of this course will cover simple and multiple regressions, serial correlation and heteroscedasticity, analysis of residuals, and stepwise analysis techniques. Part II will cover time series analysis including smoothing and extrapolation of time series, linear time series models, model building procedure, and forecasting, as well as case studies.  [ 4 cr. ]

      Section Type Instructor Location Days Times
      C1 IND Ginovyan CAS 201 W 6:00 pm – 9:00 pm
      MET AT 751 Individual Insurance Applications of Actuarial Principles
      Fall ‘14

      This course covers the application of basic actuarial principles to individual life and annuity financial security systems. Material covered will include the purpose of these systems, the development of financial security products, risk classification, actuarial pricing assumptions, the calculation of product cash flows, the purpose of reserves and different reserve methods. Taxation, required capital, profit measurement, and reinsurance considerations will also be studied.  [ 4 cr. ]

      Section Type Instructor Location Days Times
      C1 IND Horwitz SHA 202 W 6:00 pm – 9:00 pm
      MET AT 752 Group Insurance Applications of Actuarial Principles

      This course covers the application of basic actuarial principles to group life and group health financial security systems. Material covered will include the purpose of these systems, financial security product design and development, underwriting and risk management, premium determination, and the funding and valuation of group life and group health financial security systems. Group systems in the United States will be emphasized, but the course will also review the Canadian health system.  [ 4 cr. ]

      MET AT 761 Mathematics for Investment and Portfolio Theory
      Fall ‘14

      This course covers the risk and return characteristics of primary financial products, fundamental principles of modern portfolio theory, term structures and yield curves, Markowitz Portfolio Selection Model, CAPM and its applications to portfolio management, derivative securities, duration, immunization, and interest rate risk management.   [ 4 cr. ]

      Section Type Instructor Location Days Times
      B1 IND Urciuoli SHA 202 T 6:00 pm – 9:00 pm
      MET AT 762 Mathematical Finance for Actuarial Science
      Sprg ‘14

      This course covers the analysis of derivative products and their use in insurance and risk management strategies. It covers selected aspects of rational valuation of derivative products like put-call parity, binomial option, and Black Scholes option pricing model. 4cr.   [ 4 cr. ]

      Section Type Instructor Location Days Times
      B1 IND Patashnick FLR 122 TR 3:30 pm – 5:00 pm
      D1 IND Gao EOP 274 R 6:00 pm – 9:00 pm
      MET AT 782 Pension Mathematics and Mortality Tables

      This course covers pension actuarial funding methods and the use of life contingencies. Included are analyses of the funding methods allowable under ERISA, their computation, and uses. We will also review the use of mortality tables, and discuss the various actuarial functions that are used in pension actuarial calculations. Finally, the course will review implications for pension funding under the IRS Code.  [ 4 cr. ]

      MET AT 990 Seminar in Actuarial Science
      Sprg ‘14

      Seminars are offered for special topics related to actuarial science, life insurance, casualty insurance, insurance medicine, mortality and mobility, health outcomes, economics, policy, pension, social insurance, mathematical finance, statistics, and other related fields. Variable cr.  [ 4 cr. ]

      Section Type Instructor Location Days Times
      C1 IND Patashnick CAS 114A W 6:00 pm – 9:00 pm
      MET CS 563 Software Development with C++ Programming for Mathematical Finance

      In-depth discussion of object oriented programming with C++ for mathematical finance. Topics include: built-in-types, control structure, classes, constructors, destructors, function overloading, operator functions, friend functions, inheritance, polymorphism with dynamic binding. Case study: finite differences solutions for the basic models of financial derivatives; design and development of modular, scalable, maintainable software for modeling financial derivatives. Laboratory course.   [ 4 cr. ]

      MET MA 581 Probability
      Fall ‘14

      Basic probability, conditional probability, independence. Discrete and continuous random variables, mean and variance, functions of random variables, moment generating function. Jointly distributed random variables, conditional distributions, independent random variables. Methods of transformations, law of large numbers, central limit theorem.   [ 4 cr. ]

      Section Type Instructor Location Days Times
      D1 IND Weiner CAS 203 R 6:00 pm – 9:00 pm
      MET MA 582 Mathematical Statistics
      Sprg ‘14

      Interval estimation. Point estimation including sufficiency, Rao-Blackwell theorem, completeness, uniqueness, Rao-Cramer inequality, and maximum likelihood estimation. Tests of hypothesis: uniformly most powerful tests, uniformly most powerful unbiased tests, likelihood ratio test, chi-squared test, comparison of means and variances, ANOVA, regression, and some nonparametric tests.   [ 4 cr. ]

      Section Type Instructor Location Days Times
      B1 IND Weiner PSY 212 T 6:00 pm – 9:00 pm
      D1 IND Weiner MCS B31 R 6:00 pm – 9:00 pm
      MET MA 603 SAS with Statistical Applications
      Sprg ‘14
      Fall ‘14

      Offers a unified and in-depth coverage of the statistical computer package SAS, and its statistical applications. Topics include the language of SAS, data formatting, creating and storing SAS data sets, file manipulations, macro procedure, and graphics. Also included are procedures for statistical techniques selected from analysis of variance, regression, factor analysis, scoring, and categorical data analysis. Several large data sets will be used as case studies emphasizing hands-on experience with SAS for Windows. Laboratory course.   [ 4 cr. ]

      Spring 2014
      Section Type Instructor Location Days Times
      A1 IND Zhang FLR 265 M 6:00 pm – 9:00 pm
      Fall 2014
      Section Type Instructor Location Days Times
      C1 IND Freitas FLR 265 W 6:00 pm – 9:00 pm

      Students who have completed any of the above coursework or successfully passed the corresponding professional examinations may substitute these courses with courses available through Boston University’s College of Arts & Sciences (CAS). Approval must be obtained from both the Department of Actuarial Science and the CAS department offering the courses. It must be emphasized that prerequisite courses identified upon admission have to be fulfilled as soon as possible.

      Some recommended courses include CAS MA 575 Linear Models and CAS MA 585 Time Series Analysis. For a complete list of available courses, please contact the Department of Actuarial Science.

      In special cases, a total of eight credits (two courses) can be taken from the following list, provided written permission is obtained from the Department of Actuarial Science:

      MET AD 712 Financial Markets and Institutions
      Sprg ‘14
      Fall ‘14

      Investigation and analysis of organization, structure, and performance of U.S. money and capital markets, and institutions. Examines regulation of the financial industry and the role of financial instruments.   [ 4 cr. ]

      Spring 2014
      Section Type Instructor Location Days Times
      A1 IND Ahmed SMG 316 M 6:00 pm – 9:00 pm
      OL IND Sullivan ARR
      Fall 2014
      Section Type Instructor Location Days Times
      A1 IND Staff CAS 203 M 6:00 pm – 9:00 pm
      OL IND Staff ARR
      MET AD 713 Derivative Securities and Markets
      Sprg ‘14

      Provides an overview of operation, mechanics, and structure of the derivative markets and covers the concepts of options and futures pricing, arbitrage, and risk management. Emphasizes the theory of risk management and hedging opportunities offered by derivative securities.   [ 4 cr. ]

      Section Type Instructor Location Days Times
      C1 IND Vodenska SMG 316 W 6:00 pm – 9:00 pm
      MET AD 717 Investment Analysis and Portfolio Management
      Sprg ‘14
      Fall ‘14

      Mechanics of securities markets, types of available investments, and an introduction to determination of securities values. Problems of investment policy are approached through studies of portfolio selection methods and the valuation of special classes of securities (e.g., growth stocks).  [ 4 cr. ]

      Spring 2014
      Section Type Instructor Location Days Times
      D1 IND Holmes CAS B27 R 6:00 pm – 9:00 pm
      OL IND Chambers ARR
      Fall 2014
      Section Type Instructor Location Days Times
      D1 IND Vodenska SMG 240 R 6:00 pm – 9:00 pm
      MET AD 740 Planning and Operating New Ventures
      Sprg ‘14
      Fall ‘14

      Includes opportunity assessment and feasibility analysis, concept development, budgeting and financial operations, financial and human resource management, legal and organizational issues, role of boards and external advisors that lead to the writing of a business plan.  [ 4 cr. ]

      Spring 2014
      Section Type Instructor Location Days Times
      A1 IND Leybourne SHA 202 M 6:00 pm – 9:00 pm
      Fall 2014
      Section Type Instructor Location Days Times
      B1 IND Leybourne PHO 205 T 6:00 pm – 9:00 pm
      MET AD 744 Venture Capital and Financing Innovation

      Provides an analysis of the economics of innovation and the means by which firms secure the necessary capital to begin or expand operations. Procedures for raising venture capital through investment institutions and individuals are discussed.  [ 4 cr. ]

      MET AD 763 Multinational Finance and Trade
      Sprg ‘14
      Fall ‘14

      Applies the concepts of corporate finance to the problems of multinational financial management. Major topics include private and public institutions, foreign exchange rates, capital flows, speculation, analysis of alternative foreign investments, analysis of sources and uses of corporate funds abroad, multinational tax and profit planning, international risk analysis, and capital budgeting.   [ 4 cr. ]

      Spring 2014
      Section Type Instructor Location Days Times
      C1 IND Visdomini SHA 206 W 6:00 pm – 9:00 pm
      Fall 2014
      Section Type Instructor Location Days Times
      C1 IND Visdomini SHA 206 W 6:00 pm – 9:00 pm
      MET AD 764 Multinational Tactics, Strategy, and Positioning

      Introduces the student to the contemporary word of international business through an examination of the social, cultural, economic, ecological and commercial aspects that impact global operations. Emphasis is on both the thorough understanding of the effect that international business has on the different functional aspects of the enterprise as well as the manner in which firms organize, operate and formulate strategies in order to maximize their chances of successful operations.  [ 4 cr. ]

      MET CS 565 Advanced Java Programming
      Sprg ‘14
      Fall ‘14

      Comprehensive coverage of object-oriented programming with cooperating classes. Implementation of polymorphism with inheritance and interfaces and in Java library containers. Programming with exceptions, stream input/output and graphical AWT and Swing components. Threads, sockets, datagrams and database connectivity are also covered in this course. Laboratory course.  [ 4 cr. ]

      Spring 2014
      Section Type Instructor Location Days Times
      B1 IND Kalathur FLR 267 T 6:00 pm – 9:00 pm
      Fall 2014
      Section Type Instructor Location Days Times
      W3 IND Hadavi W 6:00 pm – 9:00 pm
      MET CS 579 Database Management
      Sprg ‘14
      Fall ‘14

      This course provides a theoretical yet modern presentation of database topics ranging from Data and Object Modeling, relational algebra and normalization to advanced topics such as how to develop Web-based database applications. Other topics covered - relational data model, SQL and manipulating relational data; applications programming for relational databases; physical characteristics of databases; achieving performance and reliability with database systems; object-oriented database systems.  [ 4 cr. ]

      Spring 2014
      Section Type Instructor Location Days Times
      B1 IND Russo CAS 426 T 6:00 pm – 9:00 pm
      Fall 2014
      Section Type Instructor Location Days Times
      B1 IND Lee MCS B31 T 6:00 pm – 9:00 pm
      MET CS 669 Database Design and Implementation for Business
      Sprg ‘14
      Fall ‘14

      Students learn the latest relational and object-relational tools and techniques for persistent data and object modeling and management. Students gain extensive hands-on experience using Oracle or Microsoft SQL Server as they learn the Structured Query Language (SQL) and design and implement databases. Students design and implement a database system as a term project. class. 4 credits.  [ 4 cr. ]

      Spring 2014
      Section Type Instructor Location Days Times
      C1 IND Maiewski FLR 109 W 6:00 pm – 9:00 pm
      EL IND Maiewski FLR 109 W 6:00 pm – 9:00 pm
      OL IND Mansur ARR
      BCL IND Simovici ARR U 8:00 am – 3:30 pm
      Fall 2014
      Section Type Instructor Location Days Times
      C1 IND Maiewski FLR 109 W 6:00 pm – 9:00 pm
      EL IND Maiewski FLR 109 W 6:00 pm – 9:00 pm
      OL IND Mansur ARR
      MET CS 682 Information Systems Analysis and Design
      Sprg ‘14
      Fall ‘14

      Object-oriented methods of information systems analysis and design for organizations with data- processing needs. System feasibility; requirements analysis; database utilization; Unified Modeling Language; software system architecture, design, and implementation, management; project control; and systems-level testing.   [ 4 cr. ]

      Spring 2014
      Section Type Instructor Location Days Times
      D1 IND Guadagno FLR 109 R 6:00 pm – 9:00 pm
      EL IND Guadagno FLR 109 R 6:00 pm – 9:00 pm
      OL IND Polnar ARR
      Fall 2014
      Section Type Instructor Location Days Times
      D1 IND Guadagno CAS 214 R 6:00 pm – 9:00 pm
      OL IND Braude ARR
      MET CS 770 Object-Oriented Analysis and Design

      The object-oriented paradigm is key to the predictable development of reliable software-intensive systems. Object-oriented methods consist of languages, distribution, analysis and design. Languages change and so does distribution (the manner in which processing is distributed). Basic to Object-Orientation, however, are Analysis and Design, which have remained remarkably stable. The course emphasizes ways to retain the goals of the object paradigm, the exploitation of use cases, the construction of sequence diagrams, the selection of classes, the relationships among them, and their utilization to implement systems. The course covers the relationship of GUI's to classes, and relates OO Analysis and Design to refactoring.   [ 4 cr. ]

      MET CS 779 Advanced Database Management
      Sprg ‘14
      Fall ‘14

      This course covers advanced aspects of database management systems including advanced normalization and denormalization, query optimization, object-oriented and object-relational databases, data warehousing, data mining, distributed databases, XML, XSL, and databases for web applications. There is extensive coverage of SQL and database instance tuning. Students learn about the advanced object-relational features in DBMS such as Oracle, including navigational query, BLOBs, abstract data types, and methods. 4 credits.  [ 4 cr. ]

      Spring 2014
      Section Type Instructor Location Days Times
      B1 IND Schudy FLR 266 T 6:00 pm – 9:00 pm
      EL IND Schudy FLR 266 T 6:00 pm – 9:00 pm
      Fall 2014
      Section Type Instructor Location Days Times
      OL IND Schudy ARR
      MET CS 782 IT Strategy and Management
      Sprg ‘14
      Fall ‘14

      This course provides an overview of contemporary I.T. management. It explains the relevant issues of effectively managing information services. The course highlights areas of greatest current and potential application of I.T. to business needs and reviews electronic business, enterprise business systems, and decision support systems.   [ 4 cr. ]

      Spring 2014
      Section Type Instructor Location Days Times
      A1 IND Arakelian FLR 266 M 6:00 pm – 9:00 pm
      EL IND Arakelian FLR 266 M 6:00 pm – 9:00 pm
      OL IND Arakelian ARR
      Fall 2014
      Section Type Instructor Location Days Times
      A1 IND Arakelian MCS B19 M 6:00 pm – 9:00 pm
      EL IND Arakelian MCS B19 M 6:00 pm – 9:00 pm
      OL IND Arakelian ARR

      Directed Studies

      Courses in directed studies are offered to students who plan to engage in special research topics under the supervision of a faculty advisor.

      MET AT 991 Directed Studies I
      Fall ‘14

      The course is offered to students who plan to engage in special research topics under the supervision of a faculty advisor. Application is made through the Department of Actuarial Science.  [ Var cr. ]

      Section Type Instructor Location Days Times
      A1 DRS Cohen ARR
      MET AT 992 Directed Studies II

      The course is offered to students who plan to engage in special research topics under the supervision of a faculty advisor. Application is made through the Department of Actuarial Science.  [ Var cr. ]

      Actuarial Internships

      Internship courses are also offered to students who seek practical applications of actuarial principles in insurance companies, financial institutions, pension consulting firms, and other related fields.

      MET AT 981 Internship in Actuarial Science I
      Fall ‘14

      The course is offered to students who seek practical applications of actuarial principles in insurance companies, financial institutions, pension consulting firms, and other related fields.  [ Var cr. ]

      Section Type Instructor Location Days Times
      A1 DRS Horwitz ARR
      MET AT 982 Internship in Actuarial Science II
      Sprg ‘14

      The course is offered to students who seek practical applications of actuarial principles in insurance companies, financial institutions, pension consulting firms, and other related fields. The course requires students to participate in an internship program within the industry. Students need to submit monthly progress reports and a final semester report to the Chairman, Department of Actuarial Science at Boston University.  [ Var cr. ]

      Section Type Instructor Location Days Times
      A1 DRS Horwitz ARR

      To take internship courses, student should have successfully completed MET AT 722 and MET AT 731, and must maintain an overall GPA of 3.3 or higher.

      Academic Standing

      Minimum passing grade for a course in the graduate program is C, but an average grade of B must be maintained to satisfy the degree requirements. Grades from all required and elective courses are counted toward the average.

      View all Actuarial Science graduate courses.