English

  • CAS EN 510: Playwriting 1: Writing of Short Plays
    Undergraduate Prerequisites: consent of instructor, to whom a short play or scene from a play must be submitted during the period just before classes begin.
    A seminar in the writing of short, original plays, addressing structure, language, and theme. Students read and discuss the masters of modern drama. Writing exercises are assigned to stir the imagination and develop craft.
  • CAS EN 517: Drama in Theory and Practice 1: Structure and the Script
    Undergraduate Prerequisites: consent of instructor, to whom a short play or scene from a play mustbe submitted during the period just before classes begin.
    A comparison and analysis of the design of plays from the last decade, encouraging students to imitate the form, character, and plot from these plays while experimenting with their own narrative structures.
  • CAS EN 519: Drama in Theory and Practice 2: Experiments with Character and Form
    Undergraduate Prerequisites: consent of instructor, to whom a short play or scene from a play must be submitted during the period just before classes begin.
    The reading and analysis of dramatic works; experimentation with the full-length monologue and small cast plays giving attention to dramatic structure and style. Students present their own work in a workshop format. Students also write critiques of professional productions.
  • CAS EN 520: Drama in Theory and Practice 3: Adaptation and the Theatre
    Undergraduate Prerequisites: consent of instructor, to whom a short play or scene from a play must be submitted during the period just before classes begin.
    A seminar on translation versus adaptation, comparing the two, and culling material from other writing genres. Focus on tone, imagery, stage design, and language. Students write their own stage adaptations and read various texts translated from the World Theatre.
  • GRS EN 604: History of Criticism 1
    Graduate Prerequisites: graduate standing.
    A historical survey of western literary-critical standards from the earliest surviving formulations in classical Athens to the dawn of the twentieth century. Writers include Plato, Aristotle, Dante, Johnson, Hegel, Nietzsche, Du Bois, Freud; questions of truth, rhetoric, pleasure, selfhood, politics.
  • GRS EN 606: Literary Criticism II
    Graduate Prerequisites: graduate standing.
    Survey of literary critical perspectives and trends in humanistic theory relevant to literary interpretation from the middle of the twentieth century onward, including formalism, structuralism, post-structuralism, gender studies, new historicism, and post-colonial studies. Frequent writing assignments of varying lengths.
  • GRS EN 665: Critical Studies in Literature and Society
    Graduate Prerequisites: graduate standing.
    Topic for Fall 2017: Hamlet/Lear/Macbeth: Appropriation and Performance. Historical context, performance histories, and appropriations and transformations of Shakespeare's Hamlet, King Lear, and Macbeth. Films, novels, plays from England, France, Germany, Russia, Australia, Japan, and the US. Theoretical analysis of intertextuality, cultural politics, canon formation, globalization of culture.
  • GRS EN 666: Critical Studies in Literature and Society
    Graduate Prerequisites: graduate standing.
    Topic for Fall 2017: Literature of the Early Black Atlantic. This course considers the first century of black Atlantic literature, including poetry and prose by Phillis Wheatley, Olaudah Equiano, Mary Prince, and Frederick Douglass. How did these writers represent the early modern world? How did they work to change it?
  • GRS EN 671: Critical Studies in American Literary Movements
    Topic for Fall 2018: Modernity in the Atlantic World. An "Atlantic Studies" introduction focusing on the historical conditions that unite Britain and America in a single, though internally various, culture. Readings include Gilroy, Bailyn, Ellison, Roach, Defoe, Paine, Equiano, Douglass, Dickens, and James.
  • GRS EN 674: Critical Studies in Literary Genres
    Graduate Prerequisites: graduate standing.
    Topic for Spring 2018: Early Modern Women Authors. A survey of European women writers from the 1400s to the early 1600s, and of the modern critical thinking that has redefined their literary-historical importance. Christine de Pizan, Theresa of Avila, Marguerite de Navarre, Gaspara Stampa, Elizabeth I, and others.
  • GRS EN 675: Critical Studies in Literature and Gender
    Topic for Spring 2019: Marriage and Money in American Fiction. Marriage as literary plot, legal contract, market commodity, sexual arrangement, gendered constraint, in American fiction from the eighteenth to the twentieth century, with background readings in law, economics, history, criticism. Authors include Foster, Phelps, Howells, Hopkins, Wharton, James, Fitzgerald.
  • GRS EN 682: Critical Studies in Modern Literature
    Topic for Fall 2018: Approaches to the Postcolonial Novel. Modern stories from Asia, Africa, and the Caribbean. An introduction to historical background and critical approaches to the works of authors such as Amos Tutuola, Buchi Emecheta, Nadine Gordimer, Jean Rhys, Salman Rushdie, and Daniyal Mueenudin.
  • GRS EN 684: Crst Lit&Ethnic
  • GRS EN 695: Critical Studies in Literary Topics
    Graduate Prerequisites: graduate standing.
    Topic for Fall 2017: Time and Literature 1800-1930. From 1800-1930, momentous changes in technology (railway, telegraph, photography) and science (geology, Darwin, Einstein) inspired a re-conception of time.Course examines narrative time in Byron, Wordsworth, Hardy, Woolf, and Proust in relation to these strange new ideas about time.
  • GRS EN 696: Critical Studies in Literary Topics
    Graduate Prerequisites: graduate standing.
    Topic for Spring 2018: Fables and Tales. Stories have designs on you. How the "grammar" of storytelling shapes meaning in stories from Aesop's Fables, The Arabian Nights, the Grimms' Household Tales, Ovid's Metamorphoses, Boccaccio's Decameron, and some contemporary sources.
  • GRS EN 699: Teaching College English I
    The goals, contents, and methods of instruction in English. General teaching-learning issues. Required of all teaching fellows.
  • GRS EN 705: Seminar: The Writing of Plays 1
    Graduate Prerequisites: consent of instructor, to whom one act or a full-length play must be submitted in the period just before classes begin.
    A workshop in the writing of plays. Manuscripts are read using professional actors from the Boston community, and plays are discussed in class. Individual conferences. Limited enrollment.
  • GRS EN 706: Seminar: The Writing of Plays 2
    Graduate Prerequisites: consent of instructor, to whom one act or a full-length play must be submitted during the period just before classes begin.
    A workshop in the writing of plays. Manuscripts are read using professional actors from the Boston community, and plays are discussed in class. Individual conferences. Limited enrollment.
  • GRS EN 720: Conflict and Representation in Jacobean Culture
    This seminar considers the representation of social/political conflicts in the Jacobean period (1603-1625),organized around topics of sovereignty, patronage, witchcraft, gender, and the marketplace. Texts include: Macbeth, The Revenger's Tragedy, The Alchemist, King James's writings, poetry of Jonson and Donne.
  • GRS EN 721: Three Big Books: Uncle Tom's Cabin; Moby Dick; Bleak House
    Three of the best novels ever written, all published 1851-3, read carefully in historical and cultural context. Realism and sentimentality; race, class and gender stereotypes and hierarchies; transatlantic book history; narrative innovation; hybridity and intertextuality; representing a nation.