Linguistics

  • GRS LX 642: Language, Race, and Gender
    Undergraduate Prerequisites: Graduate standing in the Linguistics program, or consent of instructor.
    Do women talk differently from men? How do race and ethnicity relate to the way people use language? This course examines these interrelated questions from the perspective of modern sociolinguistic theory, analyzing a range of languages and communities throughout the world. Effective Spring 2019, this course fulfills a single unit in the following BU Hub areas: Social Inquiry I, Teamwork/Collaboration.
    • Social Inquiry I
    • Teamwork/Collaboration
  • GRS LX 645: Languages in Contact: The High Stakes of Grammatical Border-Crossing
    Examines the mechanisms and outcomes of language contact by surveying cases around the globe from the past and present. Topics include lexical-borrowing, code-switching, pidgins and creoles, language death, and the emergence of entirely new language systems. This course cannot be taken for credit in addition to the course with the same title that was previously numbered CAS LX 515.
  • GRS LX 646: Language Variation and Change
    Why do languages change over time? Who leads and who follows in situations of language change? The course answers these questions by examining the link between language change and linguistic variation, focusing on how synchronic variation leads to diachronic change. Effective Spring 2020, this course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Social Inquiry I, Teamwork/Collaboration.
    • Social Inquiry I
    • Teamwork/Collaboration
  • GRS LX 649: Bilingualism
    The psycholinguistics and sociolinguistics of life with two languages. Topics include bilingual language use, processing, acquisition, organization; effects of bilingualism on cognition and development; the bilingual brain; the bilingual speech community; bilingual education; bilingualism in the media and public eye. This course cannot be taken for credit in addition to the course with the same title that was previously numbered CAS LX 545. Effective Fall 2019, this course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Social Inquiry II, The Individual in Community, Critical Thinking.
    • The Individual in Community
    • Social Inquiry II
    • Critical Thinking
  • GRS LX 650: Crosslinguistic Approaches to Language Acquisition
    Exploration, within the framework of generative grammar, of how similarities and differences in the acquisition patterns of syntax, semantics, and morphology across typologically diverse languages provide key evidence about the essential nature of first and second language acquisition. This course cannot be taken for credit in addition to the course entitled "Language Acquisition and Linguistic Theory" that was previously numbered GRS LX 700.
  • GRS LX 655: Second Language Acquisition
    Overview of second language acquisition at all linguistic levels. Topics include the role of the native language; markedness; universals; environmental variables; cognitive and affective factors; social dimensions; individual differences among learners; and application of theory to third language acquisition. This course cannot be taken for credit in addition to the course with the same title that was previously numbered CAS LX 542.
  • GRS LX 659: Interrupted Acquisition and Language Attrition
    Examines native language knowledge and change in speakers who have become dominant in another language. Topics include differences among heritage speakers, international adoptees, and adult second language learners; language change in expatriates; and environmental and affective factors conditioning language loss. This course cannot be taken for credit in addition to the course entitled "Incomplete Acquisition and Language Attrition" that was previously numbered CAS LX 546.
  • GRS LX 660: Historical and Comparative Linguistics
    Introduction to language change and the methodology of historical linguistic analysis, using data from a wide array of languages. Investigates genetic relatedness among languages, language comparison, historical reconstruction, and patterns and principles of change in phonology, morphology, syntax, and semantics. Carries humanities divisional studies credit in CAS. This course cannot be taken for credit in addition to the course with the same title that was previously numbered CAS LX 535. Effective Spring 2020, this course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Global Citizenship and Intercultural Literacy, Historical Consciousness, Creativity/Innovation.
    • Historical Consciousness
    • Global Citizenship and Intercultural Literacy
    • Creativity/Innovation
  • GRS LX 664: The Linguistics of Contemporary English
    Systematic introduction to the linguistic analysis of modern English (phonology, morphology, syntax) from the perspective of generative grammar. Other topics include: English and its West Germanic relatives, non-standard varieties and the development of standard English, varieties of World Englishes.
  • GRS LX 665: Variation in Dialects of English
    Graduate Corequisites: GRS LX 666.
    Exploration of how dialects of English differ from each other, focusing on grammatical variation in the US, with occasional forays into other dialects. Students come to appreciate how linguists investigate grammatical diversity scientifically, revealing the complex structure of non-standard dialects. Students must also register for GRS LX 666.
  • GRS LX 666: Variation in Dialects of English Discussion
    Graduate Corequisites: GRS LX 665.
    Required discussion section for students registered in GRS LX 665. Students must also register for GRS LX 665.
  • GRS LX 667: Indigenous Languages of Latin America
    Undergraduate Prerequisites: CAS LX 250; and First-Year Writing Seminar (e.g. CAS WR 100; WR 120)
    Graduate Corequisites: GRS LX 677.
    Exploration of the structure, history, and varieties of indigenous languages of Latin America, and of the communities that speak them. Effective Fall 2020, this course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Writing-Intensive Course, Global Citizenship and Intercultural Literacy, Research and Information Literacy. Students must also register for GRS LX 677.
    • Global Citizenship and Intercultural Literacy
    • Research and Information Literacy
    • Writing-Intensive Course
  • GRS LX 668: Structure of African Languages
    African language structure and status from the perspectives of theoretical and comparative linguistics (within the generative grammar framework), typology, and sociolinguistics, with focus on South African Nguni languages, especially IsiXhosa, and comparisons to its sister languages in that language group. This course cannot be taken for credit in addition to the course with the same title that was previously numbered CAS LX 505.
  • GRS LX 669: The Structure of Creole Languages
    Overview of pidginization and Creolization. Evolution, typology, and area characteristics of Creole languages. Role of contact languages and other linguistic substrata. Field and classroom research with Creole language speakers. This course cannot be taken for credit in addition to the course with the same title that was previously numbered CAS LX 533.
  • GRS LX 670: Romance Linguistics
    Graduate Prerequisites: prior study of some Romance language at the 4th semester level or higher (e.g. CAS LF 212 or LI 212 or LP 212 or LS 212 or CL 212, or equivalent); or consent of instructor.
    Covers morphophonological and morphosyntactic change since Latin, plus various topics in the comparative grammar of modern Romance languages. Students deepen their linguistic knowledge and analytic skills by applying what they have learned in other linguistics courses to this language family.
  • GRS LX 673: The Structure of French: Phonology
    Graduate Prerequisites: one CAS LF 300-level course, or consent of instructor.
    The sound system of standard French and dialect variation in France, Canada, and other Francophone regions. Questions about mental representation of linguistic information, processes of word formation, and language variation and change. Students discover linguistic regularities through frequent problem sets. Conducted in French. Also offered as CAS LF 503.
  • GRS LX 674: The Structure of French: Syntax
    Graduate Prerequisites: one CAS LF 300-level course, or consent of instructor.
    Exploration of French syntax with comparisons to Quebecois, English, and other languages. Topics include the position of the verb, pronoun status, questions, relative clauses, imperatives, negation, causatives, and left/right dislocation. Students discover structural properties through frequent problem sets. Conducted in French. Also offered as CAS LF 502.
  • GRS LX 676: Topics in French Linguistics
    Graduate Prerequisites: one CAS LF 300-level course or consent of instructor.
    Topics vary by semester. Taught in French. May be repeated for credit as topics change. Also offered as CAS LF 506. This course cannot be taken for credit in addition to the course with the same title that was previously numbered CAS LX 506.
  • GRS LX 677: Indigenous Languages of Latin America Discussion
    Graduate Corequisites: GRS LX 667.
    Required discussion section for students registered in GRS LX 667. Students must also register for GRS LX 667.
  • GRS LX 681: Spanish in the United States
    Graduate Prerequisites: one LS 300-level language course, or consent of instructor.
    An ethnographic survey and sociolinguistic analysis of Spanish as spoken in urban areas of the US. Focuses on issues of language and dialect content, language change, the fraught notion of 'heritage' speakers, and code-switching as a sociolinguistic phenomenon. Conducted in Spanish.