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Introduction to Engineering

EK 131/132 – Spring 2016

All College of Engineering students must earn 2.0 credits of Introduction to Engineering. The Introduction to Engineering course is scheduled for completion in the freshman year and is intended to provide an introduction to engineering analysis and/or design.

ENG EK 131 and ENG EK 132 are 2.0 credit half-semester courses. ENG EK 131 meets during the first six weeks of the semester. ENG EK 132 meets during the second six weeks of the semester. You must complete either ENG EK 131 or ENG EK 132.

Important dates:

EK 131 begins on January 20 and ends on March 2.
The last day to add an EK 131 module is Wednesday, January 27, 2016.
The last day to drop EK 131, without a W is Tuesday, February 2, 2016.
The last day to drop EK 131, with a W is Wednesday, February 17, 2016.

EK 132 begins on March 14 and ends on April 27.
The last day to add an EK 132 module is Monday, March 21, 2016.
The last day to drop EK 132, without a W is Monday, March 28, 2016.
The last day to drop EK 132, with a W is Tuesday, April 12, 2016.

ENG EK 131/132 COURSE DESCRIPTIONS and SCHEDULE

ENG EK 131/132 B1: Biomedical Engineering Environments

Professor Zaman/Dr. Bano
MW
10-12pm
Enroll Limit: 15
Location: PSY B40
Syllabus

The module will introduce the students to various environments where biomedical engineers contribute, through their training, to improve human health and well-being. The goal is to understand the complexity of various environments and how the tools and methods developed by biomedical engineers work within these environments. We will also discuss what works, what does not work and how to incorporate environmental, social and cultural context in technology development, optimization and implementation. 2.0 credits

ENG EK 131/132 B2: Tissue Engineering and Drug Delivery

Professor Joyce Wong
MW
10-12pm
Enroll Limit: 20
Location: ERA 209
Syllabus

What will drug delivery devices in the 21st century look like? How close are we to off-the-shelf organ replacement? Biomaterials have and will continue to revolutionize the face of medicine, and this module will cover current topics and issues in the design, manufacture, and testing of biomaterials in devices for tissue engineering, regenerative medicine, and drug delivery applications. 2.0 credits

ENG EK 131/132 B4: Human Brain Mapping

Professor Lucia Vaina
MW
10-12pm
Enroll Limit: 20
Location: PSY 212

The focus of this course is on the localization in the human brain of visual, motor and language functions and of their deficits resulting from stroke, schizophrenia, autism, and epilepsy. This will be accomplished by using theories and examples from human neuroanatomy, neurophysiology, neurology cases and behavioral studies. The major emphasis of the class will be on structural and functional magnetic imaging as it applies to contemporary studies of human neuroanatomy, neurology, psychiatry and of normal behavior. We will briefly discuss the principles of MRI/fMRI, structural brain imaging in health and disease, bold physiology and haemodynamics, fMRi experiments and spatio-temporal characteristics. We will emphasize the ethical aspects of the research and clinical applications of functional neuroimaging and of other modern methods of functional brain mapping (MEG, presurgical planning), the difference between these methods and their specific advantages for various aspects of clinical practice. The course consists of lectures, class discussions, writing a scientific essay on applications of functional neuroimaging, and presentations of scientific articles on the use of fMRI for clinical applications. There will be a take home ethics exam. 2.0 credits

ENG EK 131/132 EB: The Electric Guitar as a Gateway to Electro-Acoustics

Professor Robert Kotiuga
MW
3-5pm
Enroll Limit: 15
Location: PHO 105
Syllabus

The electric guitar evolves concurrently with the electrical reproduction of recorded music. This hands-on course uses the electric guitar as a gateway to musical acoustics and electro-acoustics. Before considering how electronics and amplifiers have become an integral “part of the instrument”, we review the basics of hearing, musical scales, resonance and the fundamentals of fretted string instruments. By examining the notions of distortion, compression, and feedback, an understanding is developed, of how the rock guitarist’s effects and multi-track recording are antithetical to the audiophile’s quest. This also provides a means of distinguishing “hi fi” from various notions of “good sound”. The course will be supported by field trips, demos and labs. 2.0 credits

ENG EK 131/132 EG: Electronic Control of Robotics

Professor Ajay Joshi
MW
10-12pm
Enroll Limit: 25
Location: EPC 206
Syllabus

As a student in this module, you’ll learn the fundamentals essential to the control and operation of intelligent, digital robots. Topics to be studied include infrared sensing, logic gates, use of microcontrollers for control algorithms, and basic traction systems. The course is very hands on and involves soldering, assembling, and bread-boarding. You'll build a small surface robot from basic components, learn about how it works, then propose and complete a design project using your robot as a platform. 2.0 credits

ENG EK 131/132 M1: Mechanical Design for Manufacture

Professor Ted de Winter
MW
10-12pm
Enroll Limit: 30
Location: PHO 201

Engineering design requires that thorough analysis precede detailed drawings and the manufacture of prototypes and products. This module serves as an introduction to stress analysis, micro and macro behavior of engineering materials and basic mechanics. Topics covered include analyses of stress and strain, transmission of power, torque, friction, and efficiency. An introduction to Computer Aided Design will include an assignment on SolidWorks, which is state-of-the-art software used in industry. A simple design project is included in the module. 2.0 credits

ENG EK 131/132 MD: Introduction to Mechatronic Systems and Design

Professor Michael Gevelber
MW
10-12pm
Enroll Limit: 20
Location: EMB 125
Syllabus

Mechatronic systems are integrated mechanical, electrical, and computer systems, and are enabling for a number of important technologies including electric vehicles, disk drives, power and flight control systems, production machinery, and robotics. This course teaches the design of mechatronic systems and centers around a laboratory experience in which students design and build a succession of mechatronic subsystems, leading to system integration in a final project. Lectures complement the laboratory experience covering: operational principles related to programming Arduino micro-controllers, use of associated sensors and actuators, design issues associated with the spectrum of electro-mechanical components, and appreciation for how mechatronic systems can help solve society’s problems. 2.0 credits