Student in front of computer

Introduction to Engineering

EK 131/132 – Spring 2015

All College of Engineering students must earn 2.0 credits of Introduction to Engineering. The Introduction to Engineering course is scheduled for completion in the freshman year and is intended to provide an introduction to engineering analysis and/or design.

ENG EK 131 and ENG EK 132 are 2.0 credit half-semester courses. ENG EK 131 meets during the first six weeks of the semester. ENG EK 132 meets during the second six weeks of the semester. You must complete either ENG EK 131 or ENG EK 132.

Important dates:

EK 131 begins on January 21 and ends on March 4.
The last day to add an EK 131 module is Wednesday, January 28, 2015.
The last day to drop EK 131, without a W is Wednesday, January 28, 2015.
The last day to drop EK 131, with a W is Wednesday, February 18, 2015.

EK 132 begins on March 16 and ends on April 29.
The last day to add an EK 132 module is Monday, March 23, 2015.
The last day to drop EK 132, without a W is Monday, March 30, 2015.
The last day to drop EK 132, with a W is Wednesday, April 15, 2015.

ENG EK 131/132 COURSE DESCRIPTIONS and SCHEDULE

ENG EK 131/132 A4: Icy bubbles, floating drops and sexy alligators: Acoustics out of the ordinary!

Professor Glynn Holt
MW
10-12pm
Enroll Limit: 18
Location: TBA

Acoustics is the science of sound and its interaction with matter. This module offers an introduction to the physical principles and applications of sound waves in a unique format, and covers some research results that are unusual and thought-provoking. “A demo a day” is my motto for class, which will very often be guided by the interest of the students themselves. As the title suggests I will describe and demonstrate findings from my own research. There will also be a laboratory. 2.0 credits

ENG EK 131/132 B1: Biomedical Engineering Environments

Professor Jackson
MW
10-12pm
Enroll Limit: 15
Location: TBA

Biomedical engineers perform a wide variety of functions in a wide variety of environments including laboratories or clinics in hospitals, product (hardware or software) design and development in private industry, biotech/pharmaceutical research and development. This module will provide an introduction to some of these functions and environments through lectures as well as tours. The scientific basis of instrumentation/equipment/processes will be presented in lectures as well as on, or off campus tours. As examples, tours may include facilities for medical imaging including magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and computer tomography (CT) imaging, the physiology/surgery simulation lab at Children’s Hospital, and BU’s NeuroMuscular Research Center. 2.0 credits

ENG EK 131/132 B2: Tissue Engineering and Drug Delivery

Professor Joyce Wong
MW
10-12pm
Enroll Limit: 20
Location: TBA

What will drug delivery devices in the 21st century look like? How close are we to off-the-shelf organ replacement? Biomaterials have and will continue to revolutionize the face of medicine, and this module will cover current topics and issues in the design, manufacture, and testing of biomaterials in devices for tissue engineering, regenerative medicine, and drug delivery applications. 2.0 credits

ENG EK 131/132 BX: Putting Technology to Work

Professor Jonathan Rosen
MW
10-12pm
Enroll Limit: 20
Location: TBA

Engineering is about solving problems. But how do engineers decide on which problems to solve? And using your newly minted technical, analytical, and quantitative skills to arrive at a ‘solution’ is only the beginning of a much longer, challenging, and exciting journey that will turn your ideas into new products, tools, and processes that will ultimately improve our lives. "Solving the problem" includes understanding the full impact of the new technology we have created. Making ethanol fuel out of soybeans was certainly an 'innovative' technical, engineering solution to our dependence on oil, but it nearly caused a world-wide famine in the process! This module will give you an introduction to how engineers choose which problems to solve, how we work in teams to bring those ideas to fruition, and how we measure, monitor, and modify the impact of those solutions on our families, our communities and our planet. 2.0 credits

ENG EK 131/132 EA: Photonics – Engineering with Light

Professor Roberto Paiella
MW
10-12pm
Enroll Limit: 20
Location: TBA

Curious about photonics? This module offers a brief introduction to the physical principles of light and how light is used in many different engineering applications- from familiar consumer products, optical communication to novel bio-sensing methods. Lectures will be supplemented with visits to Photonics Center facilities and laboratories, and by hands-on projects where you will design and build a photonics device. 2.0 credits

ENG EK 131/132 EG: Electronic Control of Robotics

Professor Ajay Joshi
MW
10-12pm
Enroll Limit: 25
Location: TBA

The goal of this course is to expose students to electrical devices, circuit design, digital logic design and programming of embedded computer systems. Using robotics as an underlying theme, students will get hands-on experience working on lab assignments designed around each of these areas of Electrical and Computer Engineering. By the end of the semester, students will have first-hand experience in designing and programming a robot to solve a class application challenge. 2.0 credits

ENG EK 131/132 M1: Introduction to Mechatronic Systems and Design

Professor Michael Gevelber
MW
10-12pm
Enroll Limit: 20
Location: TBA

Mechatronic systems are integrated mechanical, electrical, and computer systems, and are enabling for a number of important technologies including electric vehicles, disk drives, power and flight control systems, production machinery, and robotics. This course teaches the design of mechatronic systems and centers around a laboratory experience in which students design and build a succession of mechatronic subsystems, leading to system integration in a final project. Lectures complement the laboratory experience covering: operational principles related to programming Arduino micro-controllers, use of associated sensors and actuators, design issues associated with the spectrum of electro-mechanical components, and appreciation for how mechatronic systems can help solve society’s problems. 2.0 credits