Nutrition & Metabolism

  • GMS NU 620: Clinical Nutrition Research
    Graduate Prerequisites: Human Physiology or equivalent, consent of instructor
    The course focuses on the impact of nutrition and related exposures a wide range of clinical health outcomes. Students will study current concepts and methods in human nutrition research, including issues in the design and conduct of clinical and translational studies of nutrition-related exposures and outcomes. The class will familiarize students with important and controversial topics in the field, including those related to major clinical outcomes such as obesity, cardiovascular disease, diabetes, bone health, gastrointestinal disorders, and cancer. 3 cr, Spring sem.
  • GMS NU 700: Nutrition and Metabolism Seminar
    Students learn the principles of presenting an effective scientific talk, including the use of PowerPoint to create appropriate and effective slides. In consultation with course faculty, each student selects a topic and two related key papers and then develops three presentations over the course of the semester within the class. Using feedback provided after each practice talk, students present their final public research seminar talk at the end of the semester. The course also expands knowledge of topics in nutrition and metabolism. Var cr, Spring sem.
  • GMS NU 709: Research Design and Statistical Methods for Biomedical Sciences
    The overall objective of this course is to provide students with an understanding of basic concepts of research design and data analysis in the biomedical sciences. The primary didactic areas to be covered include framing hypotheses, the use of experimental designs and, to a lesser degree, non-experimental designs, problems of differential and non- differential error (including bias and confounding), foundational principles of data analysis (e.g., independent vs. correlated data, parametric and non- parametric analyses, measures of central tendency and dispersion), effect estimation)., The class will cover basic statistical tests such as t-tests, ANOVA, non-parametric tests, the use and limitations of statistical testing, including univariable and multivariable modeling, and microarray analysis. The course employs both weekly didactic sessions and an in-class statistical analysis lab using the SAS programming language. 3 cr, Fall sem.
  • GMS NU 711: Physical Activity and Metabolism
    This course explores the evidence relating exercise and physical inactivity to heart disease, dementia, cancer, conditions of aging, and other chronic health conditions including obesity and diabetes. Students will learn to scrutinize mechanistic research conducted at the cellular anf physiological levels and also examine methodologic issues in the assessment, analysis, and interpretation of activity data in large populations while accounting for nutrition and other lifestyle exposures. The course emphasizes research used to create public health guidelines that will inform policies, programs, and clinical practice. Students will participate weekly in critical reviews of published research, write a mini-grant proposal, and complete a "field research" assignment highlighting new technology available in the mobile-health field. At the completion of this course, students will better understand principles of exercise physiology, chronic disease pathology, population health, and physical activity epidemiology. Students completing the course should be able to apply these principles to laboratory, clinical, or public health-based research. 2cr. Summer 1 (Elective)
  • GMS NU 755: Molecular, Biochemical and Physiologic Bases of Nutrition I: Energy Balance and Micronutrients
    Graduate Prerequisites: at least one semester each of Biochemistry and Physiology, or equivalent, and consent of instructor
    This is the first semester of a 2 semester sequence (that can be taken in either order) that focuses on the Physiological, Biochemical and Molecular Bases of Nutrition. This semester will cover concepts of essential nutrients and methods for determining their requirements (DRIs), body composition, nutrition and growth, energy expenditure, regulation of energy intake, vitamins and macro-mineral metabolism (Ca, P) and micronutrients. Functions and roles of micronutrients in signaling from gene to whole organism will be discussed. Implications for nutrient requirements through the life cycle and in health and disease will be addressed. A discussion session will teach students to critically evaluate cutting-edge and seminal papers addressing each topic, and introduce students to state of the art research approaches and methodologies - basic (cell and molecular), clinical and epidemiological. Weekly writing assignments on the papers will provide experience and hone skills with scientific writing. 4 cr, Fall sem.
  • GMS NU 756: Molecular, Biochemical and Physiologic Bases of Nutrition: Macronutrients
    Graduate Prerequisites: at least one semester each of Biochemistry and Physiology, and consent of instructor
    Graduate Prerequisites: at least one semester each of Biochemistry and Physiology, and consent of instructor Regulation of lipid, carbohydrate, and protein digestion, absorption, transport, tissue and cellular metabolism. Integration of macronutrient metabolism in response to alteration in nutritional status (e.g. starvation, obesity) on a whole body and tissue-specific basis. Mechanisms regulating macronutrient metabolism in response to stresses such as exercise, aging, and disease. A discussion session will teach students to critically evaluate research papers, provide knowledge of seminal papers in the field, and introduce students to research approaches and state of the art methods (e.g. assessment of metabolic flux using stable isotopes, euglycemic clamps, metabolomics). 4 cr, Spring sem.
  • GMS NU 757: Molecular, Biochemical and Physiologic Bases of Nutrition: Regulation of Energy Balance
    This course examines mechanisms regulating body weight, body composition and food intake. Weekly discussion sessions will teach students to critically evaluate cutting-edge and seminal papers in the field, and introduce students to state of the art research approaches and methodologies, including both basic (cell and molecular) and translational perspectives. Weekly writing assignments on the papers will provide experience and hone skills with scientific writing. 2cr., Fall sem.
  • GMS NU 804: Directed Studies in Nutrition and Metabolism
    This course may be used by individual students or small groups of students to carry out a directed study under the guidance of a GMS Faculty member. Var credit, Fall, Spring, Summer 1 or Summer 2 sem.
  • GMS NU 901: Research in Nutrition and Metabolism
    These research credits reflect research taking place during the fall semester when students are in the laboratory or other research unit carrying out research for their master's thesis or doctoral dissertation. Var cr, Fall or Summer 1 sem.
  • GMS NU 902: Research in Nutrition and Metabolism
    These research credits reflect research taking place during the spring periods of study when students are in the laboratory or other research unit carrying out research for their master's thesis or doctoral dissertation. Var cr, Spring or Summer 2 sem.