Foundations Curriculum

  • GMS FC 706: Molecular Metabolism
    Graduate Prerequisites: consent of instructor
    This optional module of the Foundations in Biomedical Sciences curriculum focuses on the biochemical, cellular and molecular mechanisms that regulate cell and tissue-specific fuel metabolism. The course will present an integrated view of biochemistry and the control of cellular and organismal functions with regard to nutrient utilization. Classes include small group discussions of key papers. Mechanisms that allow cells to survive variations in nutrient supply (starvation, feeding, nutrient excess/stress) and how these mechanisms contribute to metabolic derangements contribute to disease pathogenesis (e.g. diabetes, obesity, cancer) will be discussed. 2 cr, Spring sem.
  • GMS FC 708: Professional Development Skills
    This course introduces basic professional development skills for PhD students in the following areas:communication skills, research compliance/law/bioethics, and personal professional development.
  • GMS FC 709: Research Design and Statistical Methods for Biomedical Sciences
    The overall objective of this course is to provide students with an understanding of basic concepts of research design and data analysis in the biomedical sciences. The primary didactic areas to be covered include framing hypotheses and objectives, the use of experimental designs and, to a lesser degree, non-experimental designs, problems of differential and non-differential error (including bias and confounding), foundational principles of data description and analysis (independent vs. correlated, parametric and non-parametric, measures of central tendency and dispersion), effect estimation, the use and limitations of statistical testing, and univariable and multivariable modeling. The course employs both didactic sessions and in-class discussion. 3 cr., Spring sem. Co-listed as NU709.
  • GMS FC 711: Foundations in Biomedical Sciences I: Protein Structure, Catalysis and Interaction
    The first module of the Foundations in Biomedical Science course "Protein structure, catalysis and interactions" will provide students with a quantitative understanding of protein structure, function, posttranslational modification and the turnover of proteins in the cell. In addition, students will gain facility with thermodynamics, catalysis, kinetics and binding equilibria as they apply to proteins and also to other molecules in biological systems (e.g. nucleic acids, lipids, vitamins, etc.). This course is part of a series of four core integrated courses and additional elective courses aimed towards first year Ph.D. students in the Division of Graduate Medical Sciences. The four cores will be integrated in content and structure, and therefore are intended to be taken as a complete, progressive sequence. 3 cr, Fall sem.
  • GMS FC 712: Foundations in Biomedical Sciences II: Structure and Function of the Genome
    The second module of the Foundations in Biomedical Sciences course will focus on the mechanisms of biological processes that influence the inheritance, regulation, and utilization of genes. Genetic and genomic, molecular, cell biological, and biochemical experimental approaches to understanding these processes will be explored. In addition, we will discuss the possibilities of utilizing these technologies in medical treatments. This course is part of a series of four core integrated courses and additional elective courses aimed towards first year Ph.D. students in the Division of Graduate Medical Sciences. The four cores will be integrated in content and structure, and therefore are intended to be taken as a complete, progressive sequence. 3 cr, Fall sem.
  • GMS FC 713: Foundations in Biomedical Sciences III: Architecture and Dynamics of the Cell
    The third module of the Foundations in Biomedical Sciences course will focus on the movement of proteins and membranes with the cell, the secretory process, the cytoskeletal framework of the cell and the resulting cell-cell interaction and communication with the matrix. Molecular, cell biological, and biochemical experimental approaches to understanding these processes will be explored. In addition, we will discuss the possibilities of utilizing these technologies in medical treatments. This course is part of a series of four core integrated courses and additional elective courses aimed to-wards first year Ph.D. students in the Division of Graduate Medical Science. The four cores will be integrated in content and structure, and therefore are intended to be taken as a complete, progressive sequence. 3 cr, Spring sem.
  • GMS FC 714: Foundations in Biomedical Sciences IV: Mechanisms of Cell Communication
    The fourth module of the Foundations in Biomedical Sciences course will focus on the mechanisms of cell communication. This module will begin by discussing overarching concepts before examining the specific types of molecules that initiate and transduce signals. Examples of cell signaling and subsequent cellular responses will then be considered in different contexts to provide a framework on which future learning can be applied. As the module progresses, the complexity of the systems explored will increase from individual cells to multicellular environments such as tissues, organs, and organisms. In addition, normal processes as well as the dysregulation of cell-cell communication is disease will be studied. This course is part of a series of four core integrated courses and additional elective courses aimed towards first year Ph.D. students in the Division of Graduate Medical Sciences. The four cores will be integrated in content and structure, and therefore are intended to be taken as a complete progressive sequence. 3 cr, Spring sem.
  • GMS FC 715: Translational Genetics and Genomics
    Modern human genetics has evolved at a tremendous pace, with the promise of an affordable complete genome sequence for every individual just around the corner. While the raw information has increased exponentially, its translation to patient care has not kept pace. We will discuss exciting recent advances in human genetics and genomics, with illustrative examples of their translation into improvements in diagnosis and treatment of patients. We will also discuss ethical and societal challenges of this rapidly evolving field. Our course is aimed at first or second year Ph.D. students, and will be taught by faculty in a variety of departments through traditional lectures and discussion sections. Students will be evaluated on their ability to explain the translational research process and demonstrate how individual research findings build on one another to move a field forward to ultimately impact patient care. 3 cr, Spring sem.
  • GMS FC 717: Physiology of Specialized Cells
    This course is one of the elective course modules (Module V) of the Foundations in Biomedical Sciences curriculum. Knowledge of cellular and molecular physiology is critical to understanding the higher order of functioning of tissues, organs, and organs systems. The objective of the course is to discuss the specialized adaptations of cells that help them to function in their respective tissues and organs. This course will also provide a framework to bridge the gap between the biochemistry and the molecular and cellular biology that students have acquired in the core modules (I through IV) and organ physiology and pharmacology that will be addressed in the second year. 3 cr, Spring sem.
  • GMS FC 720: Stat Biomed Sci
  • GMS FC 762: Critical Thinking in Biomedical Research
    The primary goal of this course is to use the framework of the scientific literature to develop Critical Thinking Skills to generate novel hypotheses with a focus on establishing novel biological mechanisms and pathways. Critical Thinking skills will be used to examine research findings and theories to uncover inconsistencies, bias, or faulty logic. The student will be expected to build on their careful evaluation and analysis of the papers to create a novel hypothesis each week and design a single experiment to address their question. The weekly course discussion will be student led and this will facilitate the development of teaching skills. Generally the papers to be discussed will be an older, classic paper, which established an important new concept and a newer paper that builds on that theme. Grading is based on weekly participation in class discussions, presentations, and a concise final written assignment. 2cr, spring
  • GMS FC 764: Professional Presentation Skills
    The course is designed for first year graduate students. The goal of this course is to teach students how to present their research in written and oral form. Students will give multiple short oral presentations and be critiques. They will also give 1 longer presentation. Students will learn to give presentations with and without slides. Students will also begin to acquire written skills in preparation for the Proposal writing course in the second year. The course will meet weekly and will be 2 credits.
  • GMS FC 777: Techniques in Biochemistry, Cell, and Molecular Biology
    Successful basic science research in Biochemistry, Cell, and Molecular Biology requires proposing, developing and testing a novel hypothesis. The generation of a novel hypothesis in turn requires the ability to apply the scientific method and then implement the appropriate techniques to address the experimental question. This course will complement the Foundations in Biomedical Sciences (FiBS) curriculum by providing students with a comprehensive understanding of the experimental methods used in biomedical research. By the end of this course students will master the concepts behind a wide range of experimental techniques and technologies and then be prepared to apply the most appropriate experimental system to a given biological question. Biochemical knowledge regarding "how things work" will enable students to develop their own experimental research strategies. This course will be offered for 1st year PhD students and will use a traditional lecture approach, problem sets, and discussions. Course materials will include classic papers from the literature, laboratory protocols, and problem sets. A comprehensive final written assignment is designed to test the students' mastery of the subject matter. 2 cr, Fall sem.
  • GMS FC 951: Res Cell & Mol
  • GMS FC 952: Research in Cell & Molecular Biology
    Var cr