Courses

The listing of a course description here does not guarantee a course’s being offered in a particular semester. Please refer to the published schedule of classes on MyBU Student Portal for confirmation a class is actually being taught and for specific course meeting dates and times.

  • MET CS 789: Cryptography
    The course covers the main concepts and principles of cryptography with the main emphasis put on public key cryptography. It begins with the review of integers and a thorough coverage of the fundamentals of finite group theory followed by the RSA and ElGamal ciphers. Primitive roots in cyclic groups and the discrete log problem are discussed. Baby-step Giant-step and the Index Calculus probabilistic algorithms to compute discrete logs in cyclic groups are presented. Naor -- Reingold and Blum -- Blum -- Shub Random Number Generators as well as Fermat, Euler and Miller-Rabin primality tests are thoroughly covered. Pollard's Rho, Pollard's and Quadratic Sieve factorization algorithms are presented. The course ends with the coverage of some oblivious transfer protocols and zero-knowledge proofs. There are numerous programming assignments in the course. Prereq: MET CS 248, or instructor's consent.
  • MET CS 793: Special Topics in Computer Science
    Fall 2023 Topic: Generative AI

    This course focuses on recent advances in generative AI. It starts by reviewing statistics and regression models related to generative models, then common deep learning methods described. Later, models for designing new content, such as images, music, or text, will be explored, including GAN, VAE, Autoregressive and Diffusion Models. MLP, CNN, RNN, and Transformer models covered in CS 767 are reviewed. Students should be fluent in Python programming and CS 555 and CS 677
  • MET CS 795: Directed Study
    Prereq: Consent of advisor. Requires prior approval of student-initiated proposal. Independent study on special projects under faculty guidance.
  • MET CS 799: Advanced Cryptography
    This course builds on the material covered in CS 789 Cryptography. It begins with the coverage of commutative rings, finite fields, rings of polynomials, and finding of the greatest common divisor in the ring of polynomials. Irreducible polynomials are discussed. Field extensions and fields Fᴩ [x]/P are thoroughly covered. The main emphasis is put on elliptic curves over Fᴩ and F₂ and the ElGamal cipher on elliptic curves is presented. Block ciphers DES and double and triple DES are introduced. AES and WHIRLPOOL block ciphers and modes of operation are covered. The course continues with the introduction of message integrity and message authentication. In the last part of the course cryptographic hash functions SHA-512 and WHIRLPOOL as well as various digital signatures are introduced. Finally, entity authentication and key management issues are discussed. Prereq: MET CS 789; or instructor's consent.
  • MET CS 810: Master's Thesis in Computer Science
    This thesis must be completed within 12 months. Students majoring in Computer Science may elect a thesis option. This option is available to Master of Science in Computer Science candidates who have completed at least seven courses toward their degree and have a GPA of 3.7 or higher. Students are responsible for finding a thesis advisor and a principal reader within the department. The advisor must be a full-time faculty member; the principal reader may be part-time faculty member with a doctorate. Permission must be obtained by the department. 4cr.
  • MET CS 811: Master's Thesis in Computer Science
    This thesis must be completed within 12 months. Students majoring in Computer Science may elect a thesis option. This option is available to Master of Science in Computer Science candidates who have completed at least seven courses toward their degree and have a GPA of 3.7 or higher. Students are responsible for finding a thesis advisor and a principal reader within the department. The advisor must be a full-time faculty member; the principal reader may be part-time faculty member with a doctorate. Permission must be obtained by the department. 4cr.
  • MET EC 101: Introductory Microeconomic Analysis
    One semester of a standard two-semester sequence for those considering further work in management or economics. Includes the economics of households, business firms, and markets; consumer behavior and the demand for commodities; production, costs, and the supply of commodities; price determination, competition, and monopoly; efficiency of resource allocation; market failures and governmental regulation; income distribution; and poverty. Effective Fall 2020, this course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Ethical Reasoning, Social Inquiry I, Critical Thinking.
  • MET EC 102: Introductory Macroeconomic Analysis
    One semester of a standard two-semester sequence for those considering further work in management and economics. Includes national economic performance; problems of recession, unemployment, inflation, and trade and budget deficits; money creation, government spending, and taxation; economic policies for full employment and price stability; and international trade and payments. Effective Fall 2020, this course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Global Citizenship and Intercultural Literacy, Social Inquiry I.
    • Social Inquiry I
    • Global Citizenship and Intercultural Literacy
  • MET EC 201: Intermediate Microeconomic Analysis
    Undergraduate Prerequisites: or equivalent. MA121 Calc 1 or equivalent highly recommended.
    Determination of commodity and factor prices under differing market conditions of competition and monopoly. Effective Fall 2020, this course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Social Inquiry II, Critical Thinking.

    Prerequisite: MET EC101 (MA121 Calc 1 or equivalent highly recommended)
    • Social Inquiry II
    • Critical Thinking
  • MET EC 202: Intermediate Macroeconomic Analysis
    Undergraduate Prerequisites: MET EC 102 or Equivalent
    Determination of aggregate income and employment. Analysis of fiscal and monetary policy. Inflation and income policy. Problems of the open economy. Effective Fall 2020, this course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Social Inquiry II, Critical Thinking.
    • Social Inquiry II
    • Critical Thinking
  • MET EC 203: Empirical Economics I
    Statistical techniques are presented and applied to a variety of economics problems. Extensive use of the statistical software package STATA. Effective Fall 2020, this course fulfills a single unit in the following BU Hub area: Quantitative Reasoning I.
    • Quantitative Reasoning I
  • MET EC 341: Monetary and Banking Institutions
    Undergraduate Prerequisites: MET EC 202.
    Survey of commercial and central banking institutions. Examination of macro relations between financial organizations and principal objectives of stabilization policy. Recent monetary policy. Effective Fall 2020, this course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Social Inquiry I, Critical Thinking.
    • Social Inquiry I
    • Critical Thinking
  • MET EC 391: International Economics I
    Undergraduate Prerequisites: MET EC 201.
    The pure theory of international trade. Comparative advantage, gains from trade, and tariff and nontariff barriers to trade. Case studies in international economic policy.
  • MET EN 104: English Composition
    Fall 2023 "Writing and You": In EN 104, we will be answering that age-old question: Who am I? I'm sure you have some idea about this, but how much do you really know about yourself? I hope you will delight in the connections made between language and identity and discover how best to express your values and beliefs. Readings and videos will be by or about Kurt Vonnegut, Elizabeth Holmes, David Foster Wallace, Jerry Seinfeld, and others. Your essays will be personal, analytical, and satirical. A research paper will precede a final portfolio, which will be your last chance to revise your work.
  • MET EN 125: Readings in Modern Literature
    Representative fiction, poetry, and drama from modern Continental, British, and American writers. Primarily for students not concentrating in English.
  • MET EN 127: Readings in American Literature
    Selected American writers from the Colonial period to the present. Prose and poetry representative of the American tradition. Primarily for students not concentrating in English.
  • MET EN 141: Literary Types: Fiction
    Representative English and American novels from the eighteenth century to the present. Required papers. Primarily for students not concentrating in English. Effective Fall 2020, this course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Ethical Reasoning, Aesthetic Exploration.
    • Aesthetic Exploration
    • Ethical Reasoning
  • MET EN 175: Literature and the Art of Film
    Survey and analysis of cinema as an expressive medium from the silent period to the present. Films are screened weekly and discussed in conjunction with works of literature. Effective Fall 2020, this course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Digital/Multimedia Expression, Aesthetic Exploration.
    • Aesthetic Exploration
    • Digital/Multimedia Expression
  • MET EN 201: Intermediate Composition
    Undergraduate Prerequisites: or MET-approved equivalent or exemption.
    Topic-based seminar emphasizing advanced critical reading strategies, methods for scholarly research, and models for writing relative to discipline, audience, and rhetorical context. Attention to argumentation, prose style, and revision. Exercises in reflection and self-assessment, peer-review, and one-on-one work with instructor.


    Fall 2023 topic: AI and the Humanities: Nature, Writing and Imagination in the Era of Intelligent Machines

    How can scientific insight, technological advancement, business interests, the humanities, and the coming wave of AI find common ground in creating a sustainable and livable future where freedom, equality and human rights are respected? In this English 201 course, we'll engage with the profound philosophical insights from Heraclitus, the wisdom of indigenous Nations, and study the works of 19th and 20th Century writers like William Wordsworth, E.M. Forster, and Joy Harjo to tackle the modern dichotomy between rational and intuitive thought which has become particularly relevant in the age of AI. We will put special attention on the process of thinking and writing and deploy practical methods for empowering the writing process through critically and imaginatively engaging the intricate relationship between the mind, nature, technological artifacts and the tools of composition. Our goal is to learn methods for navigating the interplay among imagination, language, AI, and various landscapes. This exploration will prepare us to use AI and writing technology and techniques effectively, enabling us to create pragmatic written works powered by our expansive imaginations.



    Effective Fall 2020, this course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Writing, Research, and Inquiry and Research and Information Literacy.
    • Writing, Research, and Inquiry
    • Research and Information Literacy
  • MET EN 202: Introduction to Creative Writing
    Designed mainly for those with little or no experience in creative writing. An introduction to writing in various genres: poetry, fiction, and plays. Students' works discussed in class. Limited enrollment.