History

  • MET HI 101: The History of Western Civilization I
    Surveys the development of Western society and culture from a.d. 1000 to the French Revolution of 1789. Topics include the development of medieval European society and culture, the Renaissance, the Reformation, the scientific revolution, absolutism, enlightened despotism, and eighteenth-century rationalism.
  • MET HI 102: The History of Western Civilization II
    A survey of Western society from the French Revolution through World War II, including the Industrial Revolution, nineteenth-century nationalism and imperialism, the rise of working-class movements, international rivalries, and ideological conflict in the twentieth century.
  • MET HI 300: The American Immigrant Experience
    Immigration has made and is remaking America. All Americans, or their ancestors, were at one time immigrants. This course provides a historical survey of this immigration. The first half of the course explores eighteenth- and nineteenth-century immigration movements; the second half focuses on the twentieth century.
  • MET HI 342: History of America at War
    This course surveys the history of America at war from pre-conquest Native American warfare to modern times. It covers colonial-era traditions, the Revolutionary War, 19th century wars with Britain, Mexico, and Spain, the Civil War, the two World Wars, Korea, Vietnam, and modern wars in the Greater Middle East. Attention is paid to varying military traditions, military culture and capabilities, from backwoods skirmishing to set-piece battles, to total war on a global scale, to today's fighting against irregular enemies employing evolving combat doctrines and assets. Documentary and other films will enhance class discussion of the evolution of American warfare and of Americans at war.
  • MET HI 373: History of Boston
    The foundations, development, and "fate" of Boston since the colonial period. Explores the architecture, geography, social structure, and economic development of the city, as well as political changes.
  • MET HI 395: Film and History
    This course deals with international films about revolution and war, their origins, social consequences, and legacies. It considers films from and about Japan, Africa, India, the Americas and Europe. It explores "the angle of vision" problem in history: who should we trust more, eye-witness accounts, great film recreations, novelists, or traditional historians? Who gets us closest to the "truth" of the human experience and condition?
  • MET HI 476: Special Topics: The American Presidency
    This course will focus on the changing institution of the American Presidency from 1901 to the present. As it examines the policies and personalities of modern U.S. presidents from Theodore Roosevelt to Barack Obama, this course will pay special attention to the evolving concept of the "imperial presidency" over the past century. We will also consider how changes in our political culture, driven by the rapid evolution of new communication technologies, have transformed the office of the presidency.