Introduction to Engineering: Fall 2017

All College of Engineering students must earn 2.0 credits of Introduction to Engineering. The Introduction to Engineering course is scheduled for completion in the freshman year and is intended to provide an introduction to engineering analysis and/or design.

ENG EK 131 and ENG EK 132 are 2.0 credit half-semester courses. ENG EK 131 meets during the first six weeks of the semester. ENG EK 132 meets during the second six weeks of the semester. You must complete either ENG EK 131 or ENG EK 132.

Course Dates

EK 131 begins on September 6 and ends on October 18

  • The last day to add an EK 131 module is Wednesday, September 13
  • The last day to drop EK 131, without a W, is Wednesday, September 20
  • The last day to drop EK 131, with a W, is Wednesday, October 4

EK 132 begins on October 23 and ends on December 6

  • The last day to add an EK 132 module is Monday, October 30
  • The last day to drop EK 132, without a W, is Monday, November 6
  • The last day to drop EK 131, with a W, is Tuesday, November 21

Course Offerings

Professor Barbari
MW
10:10 – 11:55am
Enroll Limit: 20
Location: TBA

An introduction to methods of drug delivery, the engineering of delivery devices, and principles of controlled release. Using simple models of pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics, built using the system dynamics software, STELLA, students will analyze drug delivery protocols and design (in teams) a delivery system under various constraints: physiological, economic, patient compliance, ethical. (2.0 credits)

Professor Vaina
MW 10:10am – 11:55am
Enroll Limit:20
Location: TBA

The focus of this course is on the localization in the human brain of visual, motor and language functions and of their deficits resulting from stroke, schizophrenia, autism, and epilepsy. This will be accomplished by using theories and examples from human neuroanatomy, neurophysiology, neurology cases and behavioral studies.

The major emphasis of the class will be on structural and functional magnetic imaging as it applies to contemporary studies of human neuroanatomy, neurology, psychiatry and of normal behavior. We will briefly discuss the principles of MRI/fMRI, structural brain imaging in health and disease, bold physiology and haemodynamics, fMRi experiments and spatio-temporal characteristics. We will emphasize the ethical aspects of the research and clinical applications of functional neuroimaging and of other modern methods of functional brain mapping (MEG, presurgical planning), the difference between these methods and their specific advantages for various aspects of clinical practice.

The course consists of lectures, class discussions, writing a scientific essay on applications of functional neuroimaging, and presentations of scientific articles on the use of fMRI for clinical applications. There will be a take home ethics exam. (2.0 credits)

Professor Sander
MW 10:10am – 11:55am
Enroll Limit: 20
Location: TBA

Curious about photonics? This module offers a brief introduction to the physical principles of light and how light is used in many different engineering applications- from familiar consumer products, optical communication to novel bio-sensing methods. Lectures will be supplemented with visits to Photonics Center facilities and laboratories, and by hands-on projects where you will design and build a photonics device. (2.0 credits)

Professor Kotiuga
MW 10:10am – 11:55am
Enroll Limit: 20
Location: TBA

The electric guitar evolves concurrently with the electrical reproduction of recorded music. This hands-on course uses the electric guitar as a gateway to musical acoustics and electro-acoustics. Before considering how electronics and amplifiers have become an integral “part of the instrument”, we review the basics of hearing, musical scales, resonance and the fundamentals of fretted string instruments. By examining the notions of distortion, compression, and feedback, an understanding is developed, of how the rock guitarist’s effects and multi-track recording are antithetical to the audiophile’s quest. This also provides a means of distinguishing “hi fi” from various notions of “good sound”. The course will be supported by field trips, demos and labs. (2.0 credits)

Professor de Winter
MW 10:10am – 11:55am
Enroll Limit: 25
Location: TBA

Engineering design requires that thorough analysis precede detailed drawings and the manufacture of prototypes and products. This module serves as an introduction to stress analysis, micro and macro behavior of engineering materials and basic mechanics. Topics covered include analyses of stress and strain, transmission of power, torque, friction, and efficiency. An introduction to Computer Aided Design will include an assignment on SolidWorks, which is state-of-the-art software used in industry. A simple design project is included in the module. (2.0 credits)

Professor Bunch
MW 10:10am – 11:55am
Enroll Limit: 20
Location: TBA

Graphene, a single atomic layer graphite, is the thinnest material possible (one atom thin) and has remarkable electrical, thermal, and mechanical properties. It was first isolated a little over a decade ago and is now on a path to commercialization. Potential applications include flexible electronic devices, batteries, coatings, and molecular separation membranes. Students will utilize the state of the art facilities at the BU Photonics Center to fabricate graphene, characterize its properties, and create a functioning electronic device from graphene. In 6 weeks you will have completed a hands-on crash course in material discovery, characterization, scale up, and potential commercialization of an amazing new nanomaterial.(2.0 credits)