student in front of computer

Introduction to Engineering - Fall 2013

All College of Engineering students must earn 4.0 credits of Introduction to Engineering. The Introduction to Engineering course is scheduled for completion in the freshman year and is intended to provide an introduction to engineering analysis and/or design. The requirement may be fulfilled through two paths:

I. One full semester course

ENG EK 130 is a full-semester course (4.0 credits). Completing this course fulfills the Introduction to Engineering requirement.

II. Two half semester courses

Two half semester courses:

ENG EK 131 and ENG EK 132 are 2.0 credit half-semester courses. ENG EK 131 meets during the first six weeks of the semester. ENG EK 132 meets during the second six weeks of the semester. Together, ENG EK 131 and ENG EK 132 fulfill the Introduction to Engineering requirement.

Important dates:

EK 131 begins on September 4 and ends on October 16
The last day to add an EK 131 module is September 11
The last day to drop EK 131, without a W is September 17
The last day to drop EK 131, with a W is October 2

EK 132 begins on October 21 and ends on December 4
The last day to add an EK 132 module is October 29
The last day to drop EK 132, without a W is November 4
The last day to drop EK 131, with a W is November 20

ENG EK 131/132 COURSE DESCRIPTIONS and SCHEDULE


ENG EK 130 A1: Introduction to Materials Processing/Product Development

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Professor Vinod Sarin
TR 10am-12pm
Enroll Limit: 24
Location: EMB 125

Capitalism and enterprise are about innovation - creating a dynamic economy that is ultimately dependent on the ability to fabricate and produce products. Product development therefore plays an important role in creating new businesses that fuel progress on a global basis. In this course, each student will use sophisticated computer-aided design tools to create 3-D object codes and then design and develop a specific product. The scientific base and fundamental nature of material processes used in this project will be developed in lectures and their pragmatic application will be demonstrated and taught in the laboratory. Based on this knowledge and experience each student will fabricate a prototype of the product they have designed and developed and try and market it (to the class) to appraise its commercialization potential. 4.0 credits


ENG EK 131/132 B1: Biomedical Engineering Environments

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Professor Jackson
MW 3-5pm
Enroll Limit: 17
Location: SOC B61

Biomedical engineers perform a wide variety of functions in a wide variety of environments including laboratories or clinics in hospitals, product (hardware or software) design and development in private industry, biotech/pharmaceutical research and development. The module will provide an introduction to some of these functions and environments through lectures as well as tours. The scientific basis of instrumentation, equipment, and processes will be presented in lectures and in on-campus and off-campus tours. For example, tours may include facilities for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), computer tomography (CT) imaging, high through-put protein analysis, gene expression, pulmonary function diagnostics, and open-core MRI supported surgery. 2.0 credits


ENG EK 131/132 BA: Intro to Protein Engineering and Drug Discovery

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Professor Vajda
MW 3-5pm
Enroll Limit: 20
Location: LSE B03

Proteins are the molecular machines that perform some of the most important functions of the cell such as metabolism, signal transduction, gene regulation, cell-cell adhesion, and muscle contraction. Proteins are also the targets of almost all drugs. At present biotechnology is capable of expressing virtually any protein, but the design principles are only partially understood. Similarly, computational methods of drug design are important but far from perfect, and hence are intensively studied. In this course we introduce some tools of protein engineering and drug design. These will include searches in sequence databases, protein sequence alignment, the analysis and modification of protein structures to alter function, and studying molecular interactions. The molecular origin of a few diseases and their potential drugs will also be discussed. Classes will be held in a computer lab setting, mostly using on-line tutorials and programs. 2.0 credits


ENG EK 131/132 BC: Technology-Based Brain Extenstion and Mind Reading

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Professor Vaina
MW 3-5pm
Enroll Limit: 15
Location: PSY B55

The course will present examples of cutting edge science and technology applied to brain extension and mind reading, their health related implications and ethical concerns for medical practice and for the potential uses to implement mind control. "Brain extension", involves scientific and neurotechnology approaches aimed to turning thought into action. We will discuss how signals in the brain's planning circuits may be used to drive neural prostheses, and how these approaches may be used to restore mobility and independence in people with neurological disease or limb loss. The second part of the course will explore technologies that may allow "mind reading", from the polygraph to thermal imagine, to electroencephalogram (EEG) and fMRI when used to read people's emotions and thoughts. We will examine the ethical and moral issues of using these technologies. 2.0 credits


ENG EK 131/132 BD : Engineered Drug Delivery

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Professor Barbari
MW 3-5pm
Enroll Limit: 20
Location: PSY B39

An introduction to methods of drug delivery, the engineering of delivery devices, and principles of controlled release. Using simple models of pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics, built using the system dynamics software, STELLA, students will analyze drug delivery protocols and design (in teams) a delivery system under various constraints: physiological, economic, patient compliance, ethical. 2.0 credits


ENG EK 131/132 BX: Putting Technology to Work

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Professor Rosen
MW 3-5pm
Enroll Limit: 25
Location: PSY B53

Engineering is not just about solving problems. It is also about having good ideas, working together to find breakthroughs, making important contributions that improve our world, and it is about taking responsibility for the impact new technologies have on our communities. This module will give you a head start on understanding where good ideas come from and how you can have more of them. We will use hands-on exercises, case studies, and simulations to learn how each member of a team can help make the team a success. We will introduce you to some organizational tools that will help you better plan and execute your projects, meet deadlines, and achieve your objectives. Finally, we will analyze both the positive and negative impact of innovative new engineering technologies. Putting Technologies to Work will challenge you, surprise you, and make you think! 2.0 credits


ENG EK 131/132 EA: Photonics - Engineering with light

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Professor Swan
MW 3-5pm
Enroll Limit: 24
Location: PSY B47

Curious about photonics? This module offers a brief introduction to the physical principles of light and how light is used in many different engineering applications- from familiar consumer products, optical communication to novel bio-sensing methods. Lectures will be supplemented with visits to Photonics Center facilities and laboratories, and by hands-on projects where you will design and build a photonics device. 2.0 credits


ENG EK 131/132 EB: The Electric Guitar as a Gateway to Electro-Acoustics

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Professor Kotiuga
MW 3-5pm
Enroll Limit: 24
Location: SOC B67

The electric guitar evolves concurrently with the electrical reproduction of recorded music. This hands-on course uses the electric guitar as a gateway to musical acoustics and electro-acoustics. Before considering how electronics and amplifiers have become an integral “part of the instrument”, we review the basics of hearing, musical scales, resonance and the fundamentals of fretted string instruments. By examining the notions of distortion, compression, and feedback, an understanding is developed, of how the rock guitarist’s effects and multi-track recording are antithetical to the audiophile’s quest. This also provides a means of distinguishing “hi fi” from various notions of “good sound”. The course will be supported by field trips, demos and labs. 2.0 credits


ENG EK 131/132 E7: Intelligent Robots

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Professor Horenstein
MW 3-5pm
Enroll Limit: 25
Location: SOC B63

As a student in this module, you’ll learn the fundamentals essential to the control and operation of intelligent, digital robots. Topics to be studied include infrared sensing, logic gates, use of microcontrollers for control algorithms, and basic traction systems. The course is very hands on and involves soldering, assembling, and bread-boarding. You'll build a small surface robot from basic components, learn about how it works, then propose and complete a design project using your robot as a platform. 2.0 credits


ENG EK 131/132 M1: Mechanical Design for Manufacture

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Professor de Winter
TR 2-4pm
Enroll Limit: 30
Location: PHO 201

Engineering design requires that thorough analysis precede detailed drawings and the manufacture of prototypes and products. This module serves as an introduction to stress analysis, micro and macro behavior of engineering materials and basic mechanics. Topics covered include analyses of stress and strain, transmission of power, torque, friction, and efficiency. An introduction to Computer Aided Design will include an assignment on SolidWorks, which is state-of-the-art software used in industry. A simple design project is included in the module. 2.0 credits


ENG EK 131/132 MC: Introduction to Wind Energy

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Professor Grace
MW 3-5pm
Enroll Limit: 20
Location: PSY B33

Engineering design requires that thorough analysis precede detailed drawings and the manufacture of prototypes and products. This module serves as an introduction to stress analysis, micro and macro behavior of engineering materials and basic mechanics. Topics covered include analyses of stress and strain, transmission of power, torque, friction, and efficiency. An introduction to Computer Aided Design will include an assignment on SolidWorks, which is state-of-the-art software used in industry. A simple design project is included in the module. 2.0 credits