Courses

  • GRS EI 699: Teachng Coll Ei
  • GRS EI 701: The Theory and Practice of Literary Editing
    An introduction to the theory, practice, and principles of editorial decisions, such as questions of modernization, revision, and annotation. Featuring a dozen visiting speakers and attending to notable editorial achievements.
  • GRS EI 703: Annotation
    Graduate Prerequisites: CAS EI 503.
    Studies in allusions, sources, dating, topical contexts, annotation as a part of the work itself, and marginal glosses, among other topics.
  • GRS EI 704: Editions
    Graduate Prerequisites: CAS EI 503.
    A consideration of the major editions of an author or authors. Subject varies.
  • GRS EI 802: Advanced Topics in Editing: Word and Image
    Undergraduate Prerequisites: junior standing
    An historical and critical description of the relation between printed text and forms of illustration in selected works dating from 1500 to the present day.
  • GRS EI 901: Dir Stdy
  • GRS EI 902: Directed Study
  • GRS EN 699: Teaching College English I
    The goals, contents, and methods of instruction in English. General teaching-learning issues. Required of all teaching fellows.
  • GRS EN 705: Seminar: The Writing of Plays 1
    Graduate Prerequisites: consent of instructor, to whom one act or a full-length play must be submitted in the period just before classes begin.
    A workshop in the writing of plays. Manuscripts are read using professional actors from the Boston community, and plays are discussed in class. Individual conferences. Limited enrollment.
  • GRS EN 706: Seminar: The Writing of Plays 2
    Graduate Prerequisites: consent of instructor, to whom one act or a full-length play must be submitted during the period just before classes begin.
    A workshop in the writing of plays. Manuscripts are read using professional actors from the Boston community, and plays are discussed in class. Individual conferences. Limited enrollment.
  • GRS EN 722: Medieval Performance
    Introduction to performance culture in the four centuries before Shakespeare. Reads liturgical and sacramental ritual, guild and court drama, civic and royal pageant, heresy trials, lyric poetry and song, through terms developed by contemporary language and performance theory.
  • GRS EN 724: Old Age in Early Modern Literature
    An introduction to the discipline and practice of "literary gerontology" or age studies through a survey of Elizabethan and Jacobean representations of late life. Attention to relevant classical and continental resources as well as modern critical contexts.
  • GRS EN 725: English Secular Lyric of the Seventeenth Century
    Faced with authorial challenges posed by ascendant female writers, how did male poets in seventeenth- century England defensively conceive, construct, and maintain a "masculine line" in secular lyrics? Hetero- and homosocial relations in Donne, Jonson, Drayton, Carew, Herrick, Marvell, Rochester, others.
  • GRS EN 727: Restoration and Eighteenth-Century Poetry
    Major concentration on Dryden, Pope, Swift, Johnson. Students may choose other poets from a list including Davenant, Marvell, Cowley, Philips, Behn, Wilmot, Killigrew, Prior, Finch, Montagu, Addison, Gray, Collins, Smart, Seward.
  • GRS EN 728: Hist/Thry Novel
    This course description is currently under construction.
  • GRS EN 729: The Shelley-Byron Circle
    The "Satanic School": The works of Percy and Mary Shelley and Lord Byron, focusing on their association in Switzerland and Italy, 1816-22. Works include Percy's Prometheus Unbound and The Cenci, Mary's Frankenstein, and Byron's Childe Harold's Pilgrimage and Don Juan.
  • GRS EN 730: Modern Long Poem
    The long poem as sequence, notebook, atypical research, non-novel, nearly genreless book: excerpts and sometimes whole works by Crane, Williams, Stein, Pound, Loy, Auden, Prince, Zukofsky, Olson, Hill, Howe, and others, American and British.
  • GRS EN 732: The Literature of Atlantic Modernity, 1700-1900
    A theoretical and historical examination of transatlantic literature, with a focus on capitalism, aesthetics, and print culture. Readings in Marx, Weber, Raymond Williams, Benedict Anderson, Paul Gilroy, Defoe, Franklin, Wheatley, Equiano, Wordsworth, Austen, Irving, Bronte, Melville, and James.
  • GRS EN 734: Social Difference and the Rise of Corporate Capitalism in American Literature
    Against the backdrop of recent scholarship, the course examines how Cahan, Howells, James, Wharton, Dreiser, and Dunbar indexed materialism, philanthropy, literary marketplace, and cultural capital in terms of race, ethnicity, class, gender, sexuality, and political ideology.
  • GRS EN 742: Knowing and Judging
    What is the status of aesthetic and interpretive claims? Are they rational, cognitive, or calculative? Are they expressions of preference, emotion, ideology, wisdom? Readings in aesthetics from Kant onwards, including Cavell, Fried, Gadamer, Sontag, Jameson, affect theory, Digital Humanities.