Sarah R. Sherman-Stokes

Clinical Instructor

Associate Director, Immigrants’ Rights and Human Trafficking Clinic

BA, cum laude, Bates College
JD, cum laude, Boston College Law School

Areas of Interest
Immigration Law & Policy
Contact
Biography

Sarah Sherman-Stokes is a clinical instructor and law lecturer at Boston University School of Law. Ms. Sherman-Stokes teaches Immigration Law and is the associate director of the Immigrants’ Rights & Human Trafficking Program, where she teaches seminars on Core Lawyering Skills and Advanced Trial Advocacy and supervises students representing newly arrived unaccompanied children facing deportation, refugees fleeing human rights abuses, and other vulnerable immigrants in court and administrative proceedings. Previously, Ms. Sherman-Stokes was an Equal Justice Works Fellow at the Political Asylum/Immigration Representation (PAIR) Project where she represented noncitizens in removal proceedings, with a special focus on the representation of detained, mentally ill refugees. Ms. Sherman-Stokes’ scholarship explores the intersections of immigration law and mental health and disability, as well as the interactions between immigration and the criminal justice system. Her prior scholarship has been published in the Hastings Law Journal and the Villanova Law Review. Ms. Sherman-Stokes graduated cum laude from Boston College Law School, where she was the recipient of a Public Service Scholarship.

Publications
  1. Sarah Sherman-Stokes, "No Restoration, No Rehabilitation: Shadow Detention of Mentally Incompetent Noncitizens," 62 Villanova Law Review 787 (2017).
    Publisher
  2. Sarah Sherman-Stokes, "Sufficiently Safeguarded?: Competency Evaluations of Mentally Ill Respondents in Removal Proceedings," 67 Hastings Law Journal 1023 (2016).
    HeinOnline (BU) | HeinOnline
Courses

3 credits

THIS CLASS IS RESTRICTED to students who have formally applied to and been accepted to the Civil Litigation Program. Pretrial Advocacy is the companion fall classroom component for students in the Civil Litigation Program HEFD and fall ERC clinics. Pretrial Advocacy is taught in groups of roughly 14 students with two clinical professors per group. Classes are devoted to learning the theories of practice for use in the field, reinforced by activities and simulations in which students practice skills through role play. NOTE: Students who enroll in this component of the clinic may count the credits towards the 6 credit Experiential Learning requirement or the Professional Responsibility requirement. It may not be used to satisfy more than one requirement. GRADING NOTICE: This course does not offer the CR/NC/H option.

FALL 2017: LAW JD 973 A1 , Sep 5th to Dec 7th 2017
Days Start End Credits Instructors Bldg
Tue 4:20 pm 7:20 pm 3 Robert G. BurdickConstance A. Browne LAW
FALL 2017: LAW JD 973 B1 , Sep 5th to Dec 7th 2017
Days Start End Credits Instructors Bldg
Tue 4:20 pm 7:20 pm 3 Robert G. BurdickConstance A. Browne LAW
FALL 2018: LAW JD 973 A1 , Sep 4th to Dec 4th 2018
Days Start End Credits Instructors Bldg
Tue 4:20 pm 7:20 pm 3 Robert G. BurdickConstance A. Browne
FALL 2018: LAW JD 973 B1 , Sep 4th to Dec 4th 2018
Days Start End Credits Instructors Bldg
Tue 4:20 pm 7:20 pm 3 Robert G. BurdickConstance A. Browne

3 credits

THIS CLASS IS RESTRICTED to students who have formally applied to and been accepted to the Civil Litigation Program. Trial Advocacy is the companion spring classroom component for students in the Civil Litigation Program HEFD and spring ERC clinics. Trial Advocacy is taught in groups of roughly 14 students with two clinical professors per group. Classes are devoted to learning the theories of practice for use in the field, reinforced by activities and simulations in which students practice skills through role play. NOTE: The Civil Litigation Program counts towards the 6 credit Experiential Learning requirement. GRADING NOTICE: This course does not offer the CR/NC/H option.

SPRG 2018: LAW JD 974 A1 , Jan 16th to Apr 25th 2018
Days Start End Credits Instructors Bldg
Tue 4:20 pm 6:20 pm 3 Robert G. BurdickConstance A. Browne LAW
SPRG 2018: LAW JD 974 B1 , Jan 16th to Apr 25th 2018
Days Start End Credits Instructors Bldg
Tue 4:20 pm 6:20 pm 3 Robert G. BurdickConstance A. Browne LAW
SPRG 2019: LAW JD 974 A1 , Jan 15th to Apr 23rd 2019
Days Start End Credits Instructors Bldg
Tue 4:20 pm 6:20 pm 3 Robert G. BurdickConstance A. Browne
SPRG 2019: LAW JD 974 B1 , Jan 15th to Apr 23rd 2019
Days Start End Credits Instructors Bldg
Tue 4:20 pm 6:20 pm 3 Robert G. BurdickConstance A. Browne

3 credits

THIS CLASS IS RESTRICTED to students who have formally applied to and been accepted to the Immigrants' Rights and Human Trafficking Program. Students have three fieldwork options: (1) concentration in immigrants' rights; (2) concentration in human trafficking; or (3) work on both types of cases. Students focusing on immigrants' rights will represent adult and children asylum seekers and other vulnerable noncitizens with the opportunity to litigate an immigration case in the Boston Immigration Court. Students focusing on anti-trafficking work will represent survivors of labor and sex trafficking in a wide range of civil matters and engage in policy-related work to address gaps in the local and national landscape. Students focusing on both immigrants' rights and human trafficking will represent immigrant clients and survivors of human trafficking in a range of civil matters. All students will have the opportunity to engage in immigrants' rights and human trafficking work through "Know-Your-Rights" visits at the local jail/detention center and by conducting intake at the Family Justice Center for human trafficking survivors. Students, working in pairs, assume the primary responsibility for multiple clients' complex cases, from start to finish. Students conduct client interviews, track down witnesses, speak with experts, develop documentary, testimonial and expert evidence, and write legal briefs. The clinical supervisors prepare students for their cases through weekly supervision meetings, mid-semester and final individual meetings, and mock hearings, as appropriate. NOTE: The Immigrants' Rights and Human Trafficking Program counts toward the 6 credit Experiential Learning requirement. PRE/CO-REQUISITE: Evidence. GRADING NOTICE: This course does not offer the CR/NC/H option.

FALL 2017: LAW JD 859 A1 , Sep 5th to Dec 7th 2017
Days Start End Credits Instructors Bldg
ARR TBD TBD 3 Julie A. DahlstromSarah R. Sherman-Stokes
SPRG 2018: LAW JD 859 A1 , Jan 16th to Apr 25th 2018
Days Start End Credits Instructors Bldg
ARR TBD TBD 3 Julie A. DahlstromSarah R. Sherman-Stokes
FALL 2018: LAW JD 859 A1 , Sep 4th to Dec 6th 2018
Days Start End Credits Instructors Bldg
ARR TBD TBD 3 Julie A. DahlstromSarah R. Sherman-Stokes
SPRG 2019: LAW JD 859 A1 , Jan 15th to Apr 24th 2019
Days Start End Credits Instructors Bldg
ARR TBD TBD 3 Julie A. DahlstromSarah R. Sherman-Stokes

3 credits

THIS CLASS IS RESTRICTED to students who have formally applied to and been accepted to the Immigrants' Rights and Human Trafficking Program. The seminar is the fall companion course for students enrolled in the Program. It provides a practice-oriented introduction to advocacy on behalf of indigent clients, including noncitizens and survivors of human trafficking. Students will develop a wide range of competencies with classes focusing topics including: (1) client interviewing and counseling; (2) case planning; (3) legal research and writing; (4) cultural competency; (5) legal story-telling and developing a theory of the case; (6) affidavit writing; (7) vicarious and secondary trauma; and (8) professional responsibility. Students will participate in class simulations, present in case rounds, and actively engage in facilitated discussions. There also will be two boot camp classes for students with specialized training in the following areas: (1) immigration law with a focus on asylum law and representing vulnerable noncitizens; and (2) human trafficking law with a focus on the protection framework in the Trafficking Victims Protection Act and multi-disciplinary lawyering. NOTE: The Immigrants' Rights and Human Trafficking Program counts toward the 6 credit Experiential Learning requirement. GRADING NOTICE: This course does not offer the CR/NC/H option.

FALL 2017: LAW JD 882 A1 , Sep 6th to Dec 6th 2017
Days Start End Credits Instructors Bldg
Wed 2:10 pm 4:10 pm 3 Julie A. DahlstromSarah R. Sherman-Stokes LAW
FALL 2018: LAW JD 882 A1 , Sep 5th to Dec 5th 2018
Days Start End Credits Instructors Bldg
Wed 2:10 pm 4:10 pm 3 Julie A. DahlstromSarah R. Sherman-Stokes

3 credits

THIS CLASS IS RESTRICTED to students who have formally applied to and been accepted to the Immigrants' Rights and Human Trafficking Program. In this seminar, students will further develop their trial advocacy skills by participating in multiple mock hearings and portions of simulated trials. In particular, this course will focus on developing students' competencies in the following topics: (1) witness preparation, including working with lay and expert witnesses; (2) oral advocacy, including direct/cross examination and opening and closing statements; (3) factual and legal research; (4) cross-cultural lawyering and implicit bias; (5) legal advocacy and brief writing; (6) basic negotiation; and (7) developing professional roles and identities. Students will also be introduced to the intersections between criminal and immigration law, and to law and organizing in the immigration context. NOTE: The Immigrants' Rights and Human Trafficking Program counts toward the 6 credit Experiential Learning requirement. GRADING NOTICE: This course does not offer the CR/NC/H option.

SPRG 2018: LAW JD 888 A1 , Jan 17th to Apr 25th 2018
Days Start End Credits Instructors Bldg
Wed 2:10 pm 4:10 pm 3 Sarah R. Sherman-Stokes LAW
SPRG 2019: LAW JD 888 A1 , Jan 16th to Apr 24th 2019
Days Start End Credits Instructors Bldg
Wed 2:10 pm 4:10 pm 3 Sarah R. Sherman-Stokes

3 credits

This class will cover the immigration laws of the United States, including the administrative and regulatory framework of the United States agencies charged with enforcing U.S. immigration laws. The topics covered by this course include the power of the Congress to regulate immigration; the effect of politics on immigration policy; nonimmigrant and immigrant visa classifications; the law of asylum; the intersection of immigration law and criminal law; grounds of removal from the United States; relief from deportation, immigration court representation and access to justice; and the law of naturalization and derived citizenship. GRADING NOTICE: This course does not offer the CR/NC/H option.

FALL 2017: LAW JD 968 A1 , Sep 6th to Dec 6th 2017
Days Start End Credits Instructors Bldg
Mon,Wed 11:00 am 12:30 pm 3 Sarah R. Sherman-Stokes LAW
FALL 2018: LAW JD 968 A1 , Sep 5th to Dec 5th 2018
Days Start End Credits Instructors Bldg
Mon,Wed 11:00 am 12:30 pm 3 Sarah R. Sherman-Stokes
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