This page will be updated with any corrections, time changes, new courses and cancellations throughout the year as new information becomes available. Please check back regularly to view any new announcements.

Click here for information on Add/Drop for 2017-2018.

Fall 2017

Advanced Constitutional Law
JD782 A1
This course has been added to the Fall 2017 semester. It will meet on Mondays and Wednesdays from 11:00 a.m. to 12:25 p.m. and will be taught by Professor Hugh Baxter.
The description is as follows:

This course will cover topics in constitutional law that aren’t addressed in detail in first-year survey courses. Likely topics include: standing and political question doctrine; commerce-clause limits on state regulation of interstate commerce (a.k.a the “dormant” or “negative” commerce-clause cases); selected separation-of-powers issues such as impeachment; voting and selected election-law issues; substantive due process cases concerning family and assisted suicide; procedural due process; the Second and Eleventh Amendments; selected First Amendment issues not covered in the dedicated First Amendment course; and the state action doctrine.

Climate Change Law & Policy (S)
JD796 A1
This seminar has been cancelled for the 2017/2018 academic year.

Copyright Policy, Rhetoric & Rights (S)
JD929 A1
This seminar has been cancelled for the 2017/2018 academic year.

Federal Civil Practice
JD785 A1
This course has been added to the Fall 2017 semester. It will meet on Mondays from 10:40 a.m. to 12:40 p.m. and will be taught by Mr. Stephen Donweber.
The description is as follows:

This seminar will focus on the specific application of the federal rules of civil procedure to pretrial civil practice. Each pretrial phase of a case (from the complaint to the answer to motions to dismiss to discovery to summary judgment) will be unpacked with reference to the applicable civil rules. The idea is to reach the same level of detail in analysis and close reading of the rules as that required of a new litigation associate. This will involve considerations of computation of time, deadlines, pleading rules, Rule 12, Rule 16, Rule 26, the local rules of civil procedure, and the like. The class will proceed with students drafting and discussing the various documents relevant to pretrial procedure. From a prewritten factual scenario, students will draft complaints, answer their colleagues’ complaints, move to dismiss their colleagues’ complaints, draft discovery documents, move for summary judgment, etc. Grades will be derived from classroom discussion and written product. NOTES: This seminar does not satisfy the Upper-class Writing Requirement. This seminar satisfies the Upper-class Professional Skills requirement. GRADING NOTICE: This class does not offer the CR/NC/H option.

Negotiation
JD921 B1
A second section of this course has been added to the fall 2017 semester. This section will meet on Tuesdays and Thursdays from 11:00 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. and is being taught by Mr. Mark Bamford. Limited space is still available in this section. Interested students should contact Aida Ten at ten@bu.edu to inquire about registering for the class

Violence, the Vote, and Hope: An Examination of Ethics, Law and Justice Movements
JD933 A1
This course has been added to the Fall 2017 semester. It will meet on Tuesdays from 6:30 p.m. to 9:15 p.m. and will be taught by Professor Cornell Brooks.
The description is as follows:

Violence, the Vote, and Hope: An Examination of Ethics, Law and Justice Movements This course examines the mobilization of justice movements to secure the ballot and protect the bodies of marginalized communities from the early 20th century to the Twitter-Age Civil Rights Movement, from the Niagara Movement to the Movement for Black Lives, and from the Selma-inspired Voting Rights Act of 1965 through Shelby v. Holder.  Students will explore efforts to secure the right to vote and end racialized violence through advocacy from the pulpit, in the streets, and through the courts. Additionally, students, as current and/or prospective scholar advocates, will assess campaigns to protect the right to vote through litigation from Smith v. Alwright through Shelby; from the pulpit, through sermons and hashtag advocacy; and through demonstrations, from the Selma to Montgomery March to America’s Journey for Justice.  Similarly, course participants will analyze litigatory, legislative, protest, and moral strategies to end lynching and police brutality.  The course covers advocacy campaigns inspired by infamous instances of bias-violence from the Springfield Race Riots, Leo Frank, and Emmet Till through Michael Brown, Saundra Bland, and Tamir Rice.

Writing Supplement to Family Law
JD706 B1
This course has been cancelled for the fall 2017 semester.

Spring 2018

Adv. Constitutional Law – 14th Amendment
JD916 (A1)
This course has been cancelled for the spring 2018 semester.

Business Immigration
JD807 A1
The schedule for this course has changed for the spring 2018 semester. It will now meet on Mondays and Wednesdays from 4:30 p.m to 5:55 p.m.

Corporations
JD816 W1
Professor Walker is unable to teach this section of Corporations. Professor Marks will teach the section at its scheduled time and the course will now allow the CR/NC/H option.

Corporations
JD816 E1
Business Fundamentals has been added as a prerequisite to this section of Corporations.

Cursed Amidst Mass Incarceration: Redemptive Possibilities in Criminal Justice Reform
JD970 A1
We are pleased to confirm the addition of the spring course that Professor Cornell Brooks will teach at the School of Theology. Similar to the fall offering, the course will be open to both LAW and STH students and is scheduled to meet on Tuesdays, 6:30-9:15 p.m. at the School of Law.  The class will operate on the STH calendar (last day of classes 5/1/2018).  The course description is as follows:

Cursed Amidst Mass Incarceration: Redemptive Possibilities in Criminal Justice Reform – LAW JD 970 (A1) The “Redemption Study” by Alfred Blumstein and Kiminori Nakamura indicates a decreasing likelihood of those who have been found guilty of a crime reoffending and committing a subsequent crime, over time. This empirical study, with its emphasis on a point of redemption, has been used to justify “ban the box” laws and less harsh sentencing–while reinforcing religious notions of grace and forgiveness. Against this social scientific and moral backdrop of redemption, the course first examines the “cursed” state of 2.2 million Americans with criminal records who bear a digital “mark of Cain.” These stigmatizing records may be legally expunged but cannot be digitally erased. Second, the course explores the challenges people face from at least 46,000 codified collateral sanctions (employment, housing, and employment barriers resulting from a criminal conviction), which have been described by ex-offenders as a “curse.” Third, the course covers the policing strategies that fuel mass incarceration. Fourth, the course examines often draconian mandatory sentences. Fifth and finally, course participants analyze reforms being sought and realized by religious as well as secular conservatives/progressives/moderates, fiscal conservatives, libertarians, and others. Throughout, students will explore the ethical, moral, and policy dimensions of redemption as a rational and organizing principle for criminal justice reform.

Interested students should send a message to ten@bu.edu no later than Thursday, December 21 to be considered for a spot in the class.  Space is limited to 15 JD students and first priority will be given to third-year students who did not take the fall semester class.

Employment Law Research
JD730 A1
This course has been cancelled for the spring 2018 semester.

Environmental Justice & Civil Rights (S)
JD722 A1
This 3-credit seminar has been added to the spring 2018 semester. It will meet on Thursdays from 4:20 p.m. to 6:20 p.m. and will be taught by Pam Hill.
The description is as follows:

Environmental Justice can be defined as the fair treatment and meaningful involvement of all people, regardless of race, color, national origin, or income with respect to the development, implementation, and enforcement of environmental laws and policies. Over the last two decades efforts to secure environmental justice have become important features of environmental policy and activism in the United States and globally. This seminar will explore whether a healthy environment is a basic human right, why environmental justice concerns have arisen, and what legal mechanisms may be used to address them. We will identify current situations where claims of environmental injustice might be made, and examine how existing legal tools, including the 1964 Civil Rights Act, federal environmental statutes, and international treaties might be applied to deal with them.  Course requirements include a final paper, a class presentation based on the paper topic, and class participation. Students may also register for the spring 2017 Environmental Law Practicum and gain practical experience working on environmental justice issues at a Boston environmental non-profit organization. There is no prerequisite for this seminar. LIMITED WRITING REQUIREMENT OPTION:  A limited number of students may be permitted to satisfy the upper-class writing requirement with the approval of the Associate Dean for Academic Affairs. GRADING NOTICE: This course does not offer the CR/NC/H option. OFFERING PATTERN: This class is not offered every year. Students are advised to take this into account when planning their long-term schedule.

European Union Law
JD880 A1
Professor Caruso is changing her European Union Law course to a seminar format.  The class will meet on Mondays from 2:10 p.m. to 4:10 p.m.

Evidence
JD831 L1
Judge Lowy will no longer be teaching this section of Evidence in the spring 2018 semester. Professor Rosanna Cavallaro will now teach the course. The meeting time has not changed.

Health Law Research
JD717 A1

This course has been cancelled for the spring 2018 semester.

Intellectual Property
JD857 B1
This course has been added to the spring 2018 semester. It will meet on Mondays and Wednesdays from 2:10 p.m. to 4:10 p.m. and will be taught by Professor Stephen McJohn

Intellectual Property Theory (S)
JD697 A1
This seminar has been added to the spring 2018 semester. It will meet on Thursdays from 10:40 a.m. to 12:40 p.m. and will be taught by Professor Gordon. The description is as follows:

Intellectual products include a wide range of things: the configuration of   boat hulls and baubles, the sequencing of computer instructions and musical   sounds, the patterns of words that make up stories and the patterns of   molecules that make up inventions.  Some intellectual products are protected   in law by rights that resemble “property” and some by rights in “unfair   competition”, and though significant differences distinguish the various   products and their applicable legal regimes one from another, for convenience   the rubric “intellectual property” is often used to embrace them all.   In  Spring 2018, the seminar will focus primarily on federal copyright, state   copyright (including the so-called right of publicity), and state   misappropriation law. These are all rights that enable someone to control a   flow of benefits he or she has helped to generate, in circumstances where   those benefits might not be easily captured through conventional rules of   property, tort, restitution and contract.  Such persons seek the aid of  intellectual property rights (IPRs) to give them the control they desire,  either through the intervention of a legislature, which is the primary source  for patent and copyright law, or through the courts, which are the primary  fonts for the right of publicity, trade secret law, and the tort of  misappropriation.  Attention will also be made to nonIPR doctrines which offer  much to  understand the nature of IP and its evolution, particularly the  common law of personal injury torts and restitution.  The seminar will also  address reasons and bases for placing limitations on IPRs.  For example, we  already know that the law of torts, eminent domain and nuisance must be  narrower than a command to “pay for all the harms you cause”.  Similarly, the  law of intellectual property must be narrower than an  entitlement to “receive  payment for all the benefits you generate”.  As well as being introduced to  major cases and IP doctrines in these areas, you will read and critique a  number of articles and essays on IP; many will be  revised versions of  articles by Professor Gordon.  The goal of the seminar is to understand  copyright policy from an economic, ethical, and evolutionary perspective.   SUMMARY: The seminar will address the normative bases of IPRs and their  limits, and  conceptual issues related to that inquiry.  Students may write  papers in satisfaction of the Upperclass Writing  Requirement.  In addition to  writing a paper or papers, each student will make  one or more in-class  presentations.   PREREQUISITE/CO-REQUISITE: To enroll in this class, you must  either (1) have satisfactorily completed an Intellectual Property survey  course, or a course in Copyright, Patent, or Trademark, or (2) be enrolled in  such course now, or  (3) have the instructor’s consent.

Intellectual Property Workshop (S)
JD776 A1
This seminar has been added to the spring 2018 semester. It will meet on Mondays from 4:20 p.m. to 6:20 p.m. and will be taught by Erik Hovenkamp. The updated description is as follows:

This seminar will intensely examine a small number of topics from the frontier of intellectual property law (“IP”). I will invite several intellectual property scholars to present their works-in-progress. Students will be required to read the works in advance, and will be assigned additional reading as appropriate. The scholars will present their scholarly articles, and students will respond with questions, comments and critiques. The seminar’s goals are treble: for students to deepen their substantive knowledge of IP law, for students to increase their abilities to participate in, and potentially publish their own work in, scholarly debate, and for scholars in the midst of the publication process to improve their papers through the input of the workshop group. Students must have taken or be currently enrolled in a course in IP, Copyright, Patent, or Trademark. Students who have not taken such a course (or who are not enrolled currently in such a course) must obtain the permission of the instructor. The seminar is open to JD and LLM students, and to students outside the law school. Overall enrollment is tentatively capped at 18; students beyond that number can be admitted with the permission of the instructor. Students have the option of writing many short response papers, or of writing a single in-depth paper in IP. NOTE: This course cannot be used to fulfill the upper-class writing requirement. GRADING NOTICE: This course does not offer the CR/NC/H option.

Land Use
JD855 A1
This course has been added to the Spring 2018 semester. It will meet on Tuesdays and Thursdays from 6:30 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. and will be taught by Mr. Robert Foster.
The description is as follows:

The built environment around us is not inevitable or by accident. It is the outcome of a series of legal and political choices about how people should live together; about how to regulate and control the future use of the property around them. These choices result in a legal regime that, at once, is enormously complex, implicates the most basic questions of equity and constitutional freedoms, and affects people in every aspect of their daily lives.

This course will examine the legal regime of land use from an historic, theoretical, and, most important, practical perspective. Students will be introduced to a brief history of land use controls in the United States and to some of the major movements in planning theory. The course will then cover the basic aspects of land use law: Euclidean zoning, special use permits, variances, vested rights and preexisting uses, exactions, exclusionary and inclusionary zoning, subdivision control, wetlands control, and legal challenges to zoning decisions. The course will also look at more recent trends in land use law, such as smart growth and transit-oriented development, form-based zoning, and increased federal control of aspects of local land use, such as religious uses, telecommunications facilities, and environmental and waterways controls. Students will undertake practical exercises to introduce them to how land use lawyers practice. They will attend a zoning board hearing and report on it; they will analyze a client’s proposal to determine what zoning relief is necessary; they will produce a zoning analysis of a parcel for a potential buyer. The course will cover general zoning principles applicable nationally but will focus on Massachusetts law for the practical exercises.

The class will be conducted as a seminar, with student participation in discussion required. The only prerequisite is completion of first-year Property. Students will produce a brief paper on the planning board meeting they attend and a final paper. Grading will be based on class participation, the exercises, and the two papers.

Mergers & Acquisitions
JD988 B1
This section has been added to the spring 2018 semester. It will meet on Tuesdays and Thursdays from 11:00 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. and will be taught by Ms. Margaret Brown. This section will allow CR/NC/H grading.

Representing Life Sciences Companies (S)
JD907 A1
This seminar has been cancelled for the spring 2018 semester.

Restorative Justice
JD827 A1
This class has been added to the spring 2018 semester. It will meet on Mondays from 6:30p.m. to 9:15 p.m. and will be taught by Professor Porter. The description is as follows:

The course explores the needs of key stakeholders in a justice system (victims, offenders, communities, government officials), outlines the basic principles and values of restorative justice with comparisons to the principles and values of retributive justice, and introduces some of the primary models of practice. It also identifies challenges to restorative justice. These discussions will takes place in the context of secular and religious understandings of justice. The course is organized around the issue of crime and harm within a western legal context. However, attention is given to applications and lessons from other contexts. Of particular interest is the contribution of traditional or indigenous approaches to justice as well as applications in post-conflict situations, such as South Africa. The class will include presentations by the instructor, class discussion of the assigned reading, conversations with victims, offenders and community members, and role plays of different practices. The class meets at the School of Theology and will include students from both the Law School and the School of Theology. Students will be graded on the basis of their written work and classroom performance. There will be no final exam.

Too Much Pay? Executive Pay and Profits (S)
JD971 A1
This seminar has been cancelled for the spring 2018 semester.

Transaction Simulation:  Acquisition of Urban Real Estate for Major Commercial Re-Development
JD774 A1
The posted description for this class was incorrect. The correct description is as follows:

This course is one of the semester-long transaction simulations offered as part of the School’s Transactional Law Program and satisfies the Transaction Simulation requirement of the Transactional Practice Concentration. The simulated transaction involves the sale of an urban site in Cambridge, MA comprised of buildings currently or previously occupied by commercial tenants which is to be re-developed into a high-end mixed-use multi-family and retail building. The course is intended to expose students to various transactional, regulatory and other issues faced, and lawyering tasks undertaken, by both junior and more senior attorneys in this type of transaction, and to enable students, in performing these tasks, to develop important practice skills in the area of commercial real estate. The class will be divided into teams at various stages of the transaction, with each team representing the buyer or the seller, regarding the acquisition of the property, or the local developer or capital partner regarding forming the venture that will acquire this property. Students will perform the key analytical, drafting and other legal tasks required to effectively represent their respective clients during various stages of the transaction from inception through closing. Throughout the semester students will be able to interact with a variety of real estate developers and experts. The course grade will be based on periodic drafting, negotiating and other written assignments (both in-class and homework), contributions to team efforts, and individual class participation.

CLASS SIZE: Limited to 12 students. NOTES: This course satisfies the Upper-Class Professional Skills Requirement and counts toward the 6 credit Experiential Learning requirement. The class will also satisfy the Transaction Simulation requirement of the Transactional Practice Concentration. GRADING NOTICE: This course does not offer the CR/NC/H option. ATTENDANCE REQUIREMENT: A student who fails to attend the first class or to obtain permission to be absent from either the instructor or the Registrar, will be administratively dropped from the class. Students who are on the wait list are required to attend the first meeting to be considered for enrollment.

White Collar Crime
JD854 A1
Mr. David D’Addio and Mr. Zachary Hafer have been scheduled to teach this class in the spring 2018 semester. It will now meet on Tuesdays from 4:30 p.m. to 7:30 pm. The course description has been updated:

The past several years have witnessed a number of high-profile white collar criminal prosecutions, including Bernard Madoff, Sheldon Silver (Speaker of NY State Assembly), Ronald Blagojevich (former Illinois governor), and U.S. Senator Robert Menendez, to name just a few.  Developments continue, including the Supreme Court’s 2016 unanimous reversal of former Virginia Governor Robert McConnell’s bribery conviction, and the impact that decision is having on prosecutors nationwide.  The purpose of this Course is to teach present-day white collar crime practice. The course will review:  (i) the theoretical bases of modern white collar criminal prosecution; (ii) the major statutes used by prosecutors, including mail and wire fraud, securities fraud, bribery and extortion, obstruction of justice, perjury, and RICO; and (iii) the procedural aspects of white collar crime such as grand jury, attorney/client privilege, and sentencing.  Students will learn the prosecutorial and defense techniques employed in significant recent white collar cases. Upon successful completion of the course, students will be familiar with the statutes, procedures, and legal analyses employed by prosecutors and private lawyers in white collar criminal practice.  GRADING NOTICE: This course does not offer the CR/NC/H option. OFFERING PATTERN: This class not offered every year. Students are advised to take this into account when planning their long-term schedule.

Writing Supplement to Trusts & Estates
JD706 A1
This course will satisfy the experiential learning requirement. The course description will be updated shortly to reflect this change.

10/23/2017