Computer Information Systems concentration in Security, Master’s Degree

The MS in Computer Information Systems concentration in Security provides in-depth knowledge of emerging security threats and solutions to prepare technical leaders to identify, develop, and implement highly secure systems and networks that support organizational goals. Graduates are prepared for careers as information security analysts, system analysts, or information system leaders, among others.

Students who complete the MSCIS degree concentration in Security will be able to demonstrate:

  • Advanced knowledge of information security concepts, governance, biometric systems, and database systems security, as well as network security and cryptography.
  • Proficiency in risk management, such as asset assessments, architectural solutions, modeling, and design.
  • Competence in security policies, processes, technology, and operations.

Awards & Accreditations

US News Ranking#3, Best Online Graduate Computer Information Technology Programs (U.S. News & World Report 2016)


CNSS Certification Certified by the Committee on National Security Systems (CNSS)

 

Why Choose BU’s Master of Computer Information Systems?

  • In 2016, the MSCIS ranked #3 among the Best Online Graduate Computer Information Technology Programs (U.S. News & World Report).
  • The MSCIS program is certified by the Committee on National Security Systems (CNNS) through the National Security Agency’s INFOSEC Education and Training Program.
  • Boston University is recognized by the National Security Agency and the Department of Homeland Security as a Center of Academic Excellence in Information Assurance Education and Research.
  • Students benefit from a supportive online network, with courses developed and taught by PhD-level full-time faculty and professionals with hands-on expertise in the industry.
  • Small course sections ensure that students get the attention they need, while case studies and real-world projects ensure that they gain in-depth, practical experience with the latest technologies.

Meet Dr. Suresh Kalathur, one of the faculty members you’ll work with in the Computer Information Systems program.

Career Outlook

Computer and Information Systems Managers

15% increase in jobs through 2024

$131,600 median annual pay in 2015

Computer and Information Research Scientists

11% increase in jobs through 2024

$110,620 median annual pay in 2015

Information Security Analysts

18% increase in jobs through 2024

$90,120 median annual pay in 2015

Computer Systems Analysts

21% increase in jobs through 2024

$85,800 median annual pay in 2015

Network and Computer Systems Administrators

8% increase in jobs through 2024

$77,810 median annual pay in 2015

Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Outlook Handbook, 2016-17 Edition

Best Technology Jobs, 2016 U.S. News & World Report

  • #1 Computer Systems Analyst
  • #2 Software Developer
  • #3 Web Developer
  • #4 IT Manager
  • #5 Information Security Analyst
  • #6 Database Administrator
  • #8 Computer Systems Administrator
  • Cybersecurity postings have grown 91% from 2010-2014. This growth rate is more than faster than IT jobs generally.
  • The fastest increases in demand for cybersecurity workers are in industries managing increasing volumes of consumer data such as Finance (+137% over the last five years), Health Care (+121%), and Retail Trade (+89%).

Burning Glass Technologies Job Market Intelligence: Cybersecurity Jobs, 2015

Tuition & Financial Assistance

Financial Assistance

MET offers comprehensive financial assistance services, including graduate loans, assistantships, scholarships, and payment plans. There is no cost to apply for financial assistance, and you may qualify for a student loan regardless of your income. Learn more.

Curriculum

The online Master of Science in Computer Information Systems consists of ten courses (40 credits).

Students pursuing the concentration in Security must complete the following courses:

Core Courses

(Five courses/20 credits)

METCS625 Business Data Communication and Networks

This course presents the foundations of data communications and takes a bottom-up approach to computer networks. The course concludes with an overview of basic network security and management concepts. Prereq: MET CS 200, or instructor's consent. This course may not be taken in conjunction with MET CS 425 (undergraduate) or MET CS 535. Only one of these courses can be counted towards degree requirements. [4 credits]

METCS669 Database Design and Implementation for Business

Students learn the latest relational and object-relational tools and techniques for persistent data and object modeling and management. Students gain extensive hands- on experience using Oracle or Microsoft SQL Server as they learn the Structured Query Language (SQL) and design and implement databases. Students design and implement a database system as a term project. Restrictions: Only for MS CIS. This course may not be taken in conjunction with MET CS 469 (undergraduate) or MET CS 579. Only one of these courses can be counted towards degree requirements. [4 credits]

METCS682 Information Systems Analysis and Design

Object-oriented methods of information systems analysis and design for organizations with data- processing needs. System feasibility; requirements analysis; database utilization; Unified Modeling Language; software system architecture, design, and implementation, management; project control; and systems-level testing. [4 credits]

METCS782 IT Strategy and Management

This course describes and compares contemporary and emerging information technology and its management. Students learn how to identify information technologies of strategic value to their organizations and how to manage their implementation. The course highlights the application of I.T. to business needs. CS 782 is at the advanced Masters (700) level, and it assumes that students understand IT systems at the level of CS 682 Systems Analysis and Design. Students who haven't completed CS 682 should contact their instructor to determine if they are adequately prepared. Prereq: MET CS 682, or instructor's consent. [4 credits]

And one of the following*:

METCS520 Information Structures with Java

This course covers the concepts of object-oriented approach to software design and development using the Java programming language. It includes a detailed discussion of programming concepts starting with the fundamentals of data types, control structures methods, classes, applets, arrays and strings, and proceeding to advanced topics such as inheritance and polymorphism, interfaces, creating user interfaces, exceptions, and streams. Upon completion of this course the students will be able to apply software engineering criteria to design and implement Java applications that are secure, robust, and scalable. Prereq: MET CS 200 or MET CS 300 or Instructor's Consent. Not recommended for students without a programming background. [4 credits]

METCS521 Information Structures with Python

This course covers the concepts of the object-oriented approach to software design and development using the Python programming language. It includes a detailed discussion of programming concepts starting with the fundamentals of data types, control structures methods, classes, arrays and strings, and proceeding to advanced topics such as inheritance and polymorphism, creating user interfaces, exceptions and streams. Upon completion of this course students will be capable of applying software engineering principles to design and implement Python applications that can be used in conjunction with analytics and big data. Prerequisite: MET CS 200 Fundamentals of Information Technology or MET CS 300 Foundations of Modern Computing or instructor's Consent. Not recommended for students without a programming background. [4 credits]

*If a student chooses to take both MET CS 520 and MET CS 521, the first course completed will fulfill the core requirement and the second course completed will count as an elective.

Students who have completed courses on core curriculum subjects as part of their undergraduate degree program or have relevant work-related experience may request permission from the Department of Computer Science to replace the corresponding core courses with graduate-level computer information systems electives. Please refer to the MET CS Academic Policies Manual for further details.

Concentration Requirements

(Five courses/20 credits)

METCS546 Quantitative Methods for Information Systems

The goal of this course is to provide Computer Information Systems students with the mathematical fundamentals required for successful quantitative analysis of problems in the field of business computing. The first part of the course introduces the mathematical prerequisites for understanding probability and statistics. Topics include combinatorial mathematics, functions, and the fundamentals of differentiation and integration. The second part of the course concentrates on the study of elementary probability theory, discrete and continuous distributions. Prereq: Academic background that includes the material covered in a standard course on college algebra or instructor's consent. [4 credits]

METCS684 IT Security Policies and Procedures

This course enables IT professional leaders to identify emerging security risks and implement highly secure networks to support organizational goals. Discussion of methodologies for identifying, quantifying, mitigating and controlling risks. Students implement a comprehensive IT risk management plans (RMP) that identify alternate sites for processing mission-critical applications, and techniques to recover infrastructure, systems, networks, data and user access. The course also discusses related topics such as: disaster recovery, handling information security; protection of property, personnel and facilities; protection of sensitive and classified information, privacy issues, and criminal terrorist and hostile activities. [4 credits]

METCS695 Enterprise Information Security

The course provides an in-depth presentation of security issues in computer systems, networks, and applications. Formal security models are presented and illustrated on operating system security aspects, more specifically memory protection, access control and authentication, file system security, backup and recovery management, intrusion and virus protection mechanisms. Application level security focuses on language level security and various security policies; conventional and public keys encryption, authentication, message digest and digital signatures. Internet and intranet topics include security in IP, routers, proxy servers, and firewalls, application- level gateways, Web servers, file and mail servers. Discussion of remote access issues, such as dial-up servers, modems, VPN gateways and clients. Prereq: MET CS 625; or instructor's consent. [4 credits]

And two courses selected from the following:

METCS674 Database Security

The course provides a strong foundation in database security and auditing. This course utilizes Oracle scenarios and step-by-step examples. The following topics are covered: security, profiles, password policies, privileges and roles, Virtual Private Databases, and auditing. The course also covers advanced topics such as SQL injection, database management security issues such as securing the DBMS, enforcing access controls, and related issues. Prereq: MET CS 579 or MET CS 669; or instructor's consent. [4 credits]

METCS690 Network Security

This course will cover advanced network security issues and solutions. The main focus on the first part of the course will be on Security basics, i.e. security services, access controls, vulnerabilities, threats and risk, network architectures and attacks. In the second part of the course, particular focus and emphasis will be given to network security capabilities and mechanisms (Access Control on wire-line and wireless networks), IPsec, Firewalls, Deep Packet Inspection and Transport security. The final portion of the course will address Network Application security (Email, Ad-hoc, XML/SAML and Services Oriented Architecture security. As part of our course review we will explore a number of Network Use Cases. Prereq: MET CS 535 or MET CS 625; Familiarity with OSI and TCP/IP protocol stack; Background-familiarity with binary numbers, prime numbers, binary- hexadecimal-decimal conversions, etc; Familiarity with computer programming concepts; or instructor's consent. [4 credits]

METCS693 Digital Forensics and Investigations

Provides a comprehensive understanding of digital forensics and investigation tools and techniques. Learn what computer forensics and investigation is as a profession and gain an understanding of the overall investigative process. Operating system architectures and disk structures are discussed. Studies how to set up an investigator's office and laboratory, as well as what computer forensic hardware and software tools are available. Other topics covered include importance of digital evidence controls and how to process crime and incident scenes, details of data acquisition, computer forensic analysis, e-mail investigations, image file recovery, investigative report writing, and expert witness requirements. Provides a range of laboratory and hands-on assignments either in solo or in teams. With rapid growth of computer systems and digital data this area has grown in importance. [4 credits]

METCS694 Mobile Forensics

Overview of mobile forensics investigation techniques and tools. Topics include mobile forensics procedures and principles, related legal issues, mobile platform internals, bypassing passcode, rooting or jailbreaking process, logical and physical acquisition, data recovery and analysis, and reporting. Provides in-depth coverage of both iOS and Android platforms. Laboratory and hands-on exercises using current tools are provided and required. [4 credits]

Applicants to the program are required to have a bachelor’s degree from a regionally accredited institution and proficiency equivalent to the following areas:

METCS200 Fundamentals of Information Technology

This course is a technically-oriented introductory survey of information technology. Students learn about basic computer information, different types of business systems and basic systems analysis, design and development. Students also study basic mathematics, software development and create simple Java programs. [4 credits]

If college-level credit courses are not in evidence, the department will determine what prerequisite courses must be completed in addition to graduate degree requirements. Students claiming equivalent proficiency in the prerequisite courses from non-academic sources must take an examination to demonstrate such proficiency.

Faculty

Dr. Eric Braude

Eric Braude

Associate Professor of Computer Science
PhD, Columbia University; MS, University of Miami; MS, University of Illinois; BS, University of Natal (South Africa)

Dr. Lou Chitkushev

Lou Chitkushev

Associate Dean for Academic Affairs and Associate Professor of Computer Science; Director of Health Informatics and Health Sciences Programs
PhD, Boston University; MS, Medical College of Virginia; MS, BS, University of Belgrade

John Day

John Day

Lecturer in Computer Science
MSEE, BSEE, University of Illinois

Stu Jacobs

Stu Jacobs

Lecturer in Computer Science

MS, Southern Connecticut State University; BS, University of Wisconsin, Madison

Dr. Suresh Kalathur

Suresh Kalathur

Assistant Professor of Computer Science; Director of Analytics Programs
PhD, Brandeis University; MS, Indian Institute of Technology; BS, Regional Engineering College (Warangal, India)

Dr. Vijay Kanabar

Vijay Kanabar, PMP

Associate Professor of Computer Science; Director of Project Management Programs
PhD, University of Manitoba (Canada); MS, Florida Institute of Technology; MBA, Webber College; BS, University of Madras (India)

Dr. Jae Young Lee

Jae Young Lee

Assistant Professor of Computer Science
PhD, MS, University of Texas at Arlington; BS, Seoul National University (Korea)

Dr. Robert Schudy

Robert Schudy

Associate Professor of Computer Science
PhD, MS, University of Rochester; BA, University of California San Diego

Dr. Victor Shtern

Victor Shtern

Associate Professor Emeritus of Computer Science
PhD, Leningrad Aluminum Institute (Russia); MS, Leningrad Institute of Technology; MBA, Boston University

Dr. Anatoly Temkin

Anatoly Temkin

Assistant Professor and Chair of Computer Science
PhD, Kazan University (Russia); MS, Moscow University

Dr. Guanglan Zhang

Guanglan Zhang

Assistant Professor of Computer Science; Faculty Coordinator for Health Informatics Programs
PhD, MEng, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore; BS, Luoyang Institute of Technology

Dr. Yuting Zhang

Yuting Zhang

Assistant Professor of Computer Science
PhD, Boston University; MS, BS University of Science and Technology Beijing

Dr. Tanya Zlateva

Tanya Zlateva

Dean of Metropolitan College and Professor of the Practice of Computer Science and Education; Director of Security Programs
PhD, Dresden University of Technology (Germany); MS, Dresden University of Technology; BS, Dresden University of Technology

Getting Started

To learn more or to contact an enrollment advisor before you get started, request information using the button below and tell us a little about yourself. Someone will be in touch to answer any questions you may have about the program and detail the next steps in earning your degree. You can also start your application or register for a course at Metropolitan College.