Skills-Based Courses

These courses address the various skills needed by a successful practicing attorney. Please note that some courses are not offered every year.

Advocacy & Representations of Clients

3 credits

THIS CLASS IS RESTRICTED to students who have formally applied to and been accepted to the Civil Litigation Program. Student in the Civil Litigation Program handle their own case loads, representing indigent clients in civil cases under the supervision of clinical faculty. Students may participate in the Program for either a full year (the Housing, Employment, Family and Disability Clinic (HEFD)) or for one semester (the Employment Rights Clinic (ERC)). Students participating in the HEFD Clinic work on cases in areas such as domestic relations, eviction defense, employment law and Social Security appeals. Students in the ERC represent clients in unemployment compensation cases, with a possibility of working on wage and hour disputes, discrimination/sexual harassment cases, and Family Medical Leave Act cases. PRE/CO-REQUISITES: Evidence. NOTE: The Civil Litigation Program counts towards the 6 credit Experiential Learning requirement. GRADING NOTICE: This course does not offer the CR/NC/H option.

FALL 2018: LAW JD 861 A1 , Sep 4th to Dec 6th 2018
Days Start End Credits Instructors Bldg
ARR TBD TBD 3 Robert G. BurdickConstance A. Browne
FALL 2018: LAW JD 861 B1 , Sep 4th to Dec 6th 2018
Days Start End Credits Instructors Bldg
ARR TBD TBD 3 Robert G. BurdickConstance A. Browne
SPRG 2019: LAW JD 861 A1 , Jan 14th to Apr 24th 2019
Days Start End Credits Instructors Bldg
ARR TBD TBD 3 Robert G. BurdickConstance A. Browne
SPRG 2019: LAW JD 861 B2 , Jan 14th to Apr 24th 2019
Days Start End Credits Instructors Bldg
ARR TBD TBD 3 Robert G. BurdickConstance A. Browne

3 credits

THIS CLASS IS RESTRICTED to students who have formally applied to and been accepted to the Civil Litigation Program. Pretrial Advocacy is the companion fall classroom component for students in the Civil Litigation Program HEFD and fall ERC clinics. Pretrial Advocacy is taught in groups of roughly 14 students with two clinical professors per group. Classes are devoted to learning the theories of practice for use in the field, reinforced by activities and simulations in which students practice skills through role play. NOTE: Students who enroll in this component of the clinic may count the credits towards the 6 credit Experiential Learning requirement or the Professional Responsibility requirement. It may not be used to satisfy more than one requirement. GRADING NOTICE: This course does not offer the CR/NC/H option.

FALL 2018: LAW JD 973 A1 , Sep 4th to Dec 4th 2018
Days Start End Credits Instructors Bldg
Tue 4:20 pm 7:20 pm 3 Robert G. BurdickConstance A. Browne
FALL 2018: LAW JD 973 B1 , Sep 4th to Dec 4th 2018
Days Start End Credits Instructors Bldg
Tue 4:20 pm 7:20 pm 3 Robert G. BurdickConstance A. Browne

3 credits

THIS CLASS IS RESTRICTED to students who have formally applied to and been accepted to the Civil Litigation Program. Trial Advocacy is the companion spring classroom component for students in the Civil Litigation Program HEFD and spring ERC clinics. Trial Advocacy is taught in groups of roughly 14 students with two clinical professors per group. Classes are devoted to learning the theories of practice for use in the field, reinforced by activities and simulations in which students practice skills through role play. NOTE: The Civil Litigation Program counts towards the 6 credit Experiential Learning requirement. GRADING NOTICE: This course does not offer the CR/NC/H option.

SPRG 2019: LAW JD 974 A1 , Jan 15th to Apr 23rd 2019
Days Start End Credits Instructors Bldg
Tue 4:20 pm 6:20 pm 3 Robert G. BurdickConstance A. Browne
SPRG 2019: LAW JD 974 B1 , Jan 15th to Apr 23rd 2019
Days Start End Credits Instructors Bldg
Tue 4:20 pm 6:20 pm 3 Robert G. BurdickConstance A. Browne

2 credits

The purpose of this seminar is to provide students with the opportunity to develop client counseling skills needed to deal with a wide variety of clients and their various legal problems. The focus of the seminar is on foundational skills necessary to successfully work with clients in identifying client interests and goals at the outset of a matter, and in discussing and analyzing strategic options and new developments as matters progress. This seminar is designed for students to learn by engaging in mock client counseling interviews and other group exercises. Accordingly, much of the time will be filled with practice interviews and discussion of strategies for how to navigate client interviews and meetings. ENROLLMENT LIMIT: 16 students. NOTES: This seminar does not satisfy the upper-class writing requirement. This class counts toward the 6 credit Experiential Learning requirement. ** A student who fails to attend the initial meeting of a seminar (designated by an (S) in the title), or to obtain permission to be absent from either the instructor or the Registrar, may be administratively dropped from the seminar. Students who are on a wait list for a seminar are required to attend the first seminar meeting to be considered for enrollment.

SPRG 2019: LAW JD 862 A1 , Jan 15th to Apr 23rd 2019
Days Start End Credits Instructors Bldg
Tue 2:10 pm 4:10 pm 2 Catherine Mondell

2 credits

This CLASS IS RESTRICTED to students who have received permission from the Clinical and Experiential Programs Office to enroll. Students in the Practicum provide pro bono representation to low income defendants in small claims court on credit card collection matters. Students engage in client interviewing and counseling, negotiation, and oral advocacy including small claims trials, under the supervision of the clinic instructors. Students must be available to be at court on Thursday afternoons. In addition, there is a weekly seminar that covers substantive topics and skills development in areas related to the clinic work such as consumer law including Truth in Lending, Fair Debt Collection Practices Act and the Massachusetts Consumer Cost Credit Act. NOTE: The Consumer Debt Practicum counts toward the 6 credit Experiential Learning requirement. GRADING NOTICE: This class does not offer the CR/NC/H option.

FALL 2018: LAW JD 705 A1 , Sep 10th to Dec 3rd 2018
Days Start End Credits Instructors Bldg
Mon 4:20 pm 5:50 pm 2 Staff
SPRG 2019: LAW JD 705 A1 , Jan 14th to Apr 22nd 2019
Days Start End Credits Instructors Bldg
Mon 4:20 pm 5:50 pm 2 StaffStaff

3 credits

THIS CLASS IS RESTRICTED to students who have formally applied to and been accepted to the Criminal Law Clinical Program. This course meets in the spring and is mandatory for all 2L students in the Criminal Law Clinical Program. Criminal Trial Advocacy focuses on teaching courtroom skills in the context of criminal trial litigation. NOTE: The Criminal Law Clinical Program counts toward the 6 credit Experiential Learning requirement. GRADING NOTICE: This course does not offer the CR/NC/H option.

SPRG 2019: LAW JD 981 A1 , Jan 15th to Apr 23rd 2019
Days Start End Credits Instructors Bldg
Tue 2:10 pm 4:10 pm 3 Wendy KaplanBrian A. Wilson
Fri 10:30 am 1:30 pm 3 Wendy KaplanBrian A. Wilson

5 credits

THIS CLASS IS RESTRICTED to students who have formally applied to and been accepted to the Criminal Law Clinical Program. Criminal Trial Practice I is mandatory for students in their first semester of the Program. 2Ls take the course fall or spring, as determined in consultation with the Director of the Criminal Law Clinical Program upon acceptance to the Program. 3Ls take the course in the fall. The course consists of a fieldwork and classroom component. The classroom component provides students with an introduction to Massachusetts criminal procedure and basic instruction in lawyering skills such as case planning and investigation. For their fieldwork, students are assigned to cases handled by senior members of the Program and conduct tasks out of court such as legal research, fact investigation, witness interviews and preparation. Students spend one morning a week in court observing and second seating the cases they have helped to prepare. NOTE: The Criminal Clinical Program counts toward the 6 credit Experiential Learning requirement. GRADING NOTICE: This course does not offer the CR/NC/H option.

FALL 2018: LAW JD 982 A1 , Sep 4th to Dec 4th 2018
Days Start End Credits Instructors Bldg
Tue 4:20 pm 6:20 pm 5 David RossmanBrian A. Wilson
SPRG 2019: LAW JD 982 A1 , Jan 15th to Apr 23rd 2019
Days Start End Credits Instructors Bldg
Tue 2:10 pm 4:10 pm 5 Wendy KaplanBrian A. Wilson
Fri 10:30 am 1:30 pm 5 Wendy KaplanBrian A. Wilson

8 credits

THIS CLASS IS RESTRICTED to 3L students who started the Criminal Clinic in Spring 2015. Criminal Trial Practice II will consider advanced issues in criminal practice, such as motions to suppress and sentencing advocacy. In conjunction with their class work, these students will be assigned to either the Prosecutor or Defender component of the clinic. Each student will be expected to devote at least two mornings a week to their work in court. NOTE: The Criminal Clinical Program satisfies the upper-class professional skills requirement.

8 credits

THIS CLASS IS RESTRICTED to students who have formally applied to and been accepted to the Criminal Law Clinical Program. Criminal Trial Practice II is for students in their second semester of the Program and who have been assigned to the Defender section. Students represent indigent defendants charged with criminal offenses in either the Boston Municipal Court or the Boston Juvenile Court. Students gain exposure to lawyering experiences such as investigation, interviewing, counseling and trial advocacy with a primary emphasis on the development of trial skills. Students spend the first part of the semester acting as defense counsel in misdemeanor cases of increasing complexity. Later in the semester, representation in felony cases is possible, as well as exposure to a number of other aspects of the criminal justice system. Students must be available to be in court two days a week, from Monday through Thursday. NOTE: The Criminal Clinical Program counts towards the 6 credit Experiential Learning requirement. GRADING NOTICE: This course does not offer the CR/NC/H option.

FALL 2018: LAW JD 898 A1 , Sep 7th to Nov 30th 2018
Days Start End Credits Instructors Bldg
Fri 10:30 am 12:30 pm 8 Wendy KaplanDavid Rossman
SPRG 2019: LAW JD 898 A1 , Jan 17th to Apr 18th 2019
Days Start End Credits Instructors Bldg
Thu 4:20 pm 6:20 pm 8 Karen Pita LoorWendy Kaplan

Var credits

THIS CLASS IS RESTRICTED to students who have formally applied to and been accepted to the Criminal Law Clinical Program. Criminal Trial Practice II is for students in their second semester of the Program and who have been assigned to the Prosecutor section. Students act as prosecutors in the Quincy District Court on behalf of the Norfolk County District Attorney's Office, handling felony and misdemeanor cases of increasing complexity under the supervision of the clinical professor. Students are exposed to a wide variety of experiences, including investigation, interviewing and trial advocacy. Students handle pretrial matters, litigate evidentiary hearings, and are assigned to conduct every phase of jury or bench trials. Students collaborate but serve as the lead prosecutors on their own cases. Case assignments are based upon an individual assessment of a student's progress and demonstrated competence. Students in the Prosecutor Clinic may choose to enroll for 5 or 8 credits. Those receiving 5 credits must be available to be in court for a full day on Monday, Tuesday or Thursday. Those receiving 8 credits must be available on an additional half day on Monday, Tuesday or Thursday. NOTE: The Criminal Clinical Program counts toward the 6 credit Experiential Learning requirement. GRADING NOTICE: This course does not offer the CR/NC/H option.

FALL 2018: LAW JD 899 A1 , Sep 7th to Nov 30th 2018
Days Start End Credits Instructors Bldg
Fri 10:30 am 12:30 pm Var David RossmanBrian A. Wilson
FALL 2018: LAW JD 899 B1 , Sep 7th to Nov 30th 2018
Days Start End Credits Instructors Bldg
Fri 10:30 am 12:30 pm Var David RossmanBrian A. Wilson
SPRG 2019: LAW JD 899 A1 , Jan 17th to Apr 18th 2019
Days Start End Credits Instructors Bldg
Thu 4:20 pm 6:20 pm Var Brian A. WilsonStaff
SPRG 2019: LAW JD 899 B1 , Jan 17th to Apr 18th 2019
Days Start End Credits Instructors Bldg
Thu 4:20 pm 6:20 pm Var Brian A. WilsonStaff

3 credits

THIS CLASS IS RESTRICTED to students who have formally applied to and been accepted to the Criminal Law Clinical Program. It is open to all 3Ls and 2Ls participating in the Program either semester. The course focuses on ethical issues that arise in the context of criminal trial litigation. NOTE: This course satisfies the Professional Responsibility requirement. GRADING NOTICE: This course does not offer the CR/NC/H option.

FALL 2018: LAW JD 923 A1 , Sep 5th to Dec 5th 2018
Days Start End Credits Instructors Bldg
Wed 5:00 pm 7:00 pm 3 Stuart Hurowitz

3 credits

This seminar will involve an in-depth examination of discovery practice under the federal rules of civil procedure. The topics to be covered are set out below. Grades will be derived from a final paper, mini-quizzes and assignments, and classroom participation. There is no required text. 1. History and purpose of discovery. 2. Discovery abuse. 3. Rule 26. The scope of discovery and the major limitations on the scope of discovery. 4. Rule 26. The conference of the parties and planning for discovery. The impact of the local rules on discovery. 5. Rule 26. Self-executing disclosures and expert discovery. 6. e-discovery. 7. Written discovery. Rules 33, 34, and 36 (interrogatories, document requests, and requests for admission). 8. Deposition discovery. Rules 30-32. Rule 45 subpoenas. 9. Rule 37. Failure to cooperate in discovery. Sanctions. 10. Rule 37. Discovery motion practice. 11. Effective discovery. NOTES: This seminar does not satisfy the Upper-class Writing Requirement. This seminar satisfies the upper-class professional skills requirement. RESTRICTION: Students who completed E-discovery (JD 795) may not enroll. GRADING NOTICE: This class does not offer the CR/NC/H option. ** A student who fails to attend the initial meeting of a seminar (designated by an (S) in the title), or to obtain permission to be absent from either the instructor or the Registrar, may be administratively dropped from the seminar. Students who are on a wait list for a seminar are required to attend the first seminar meeting to be considered for enrollment.

3 credits

THIS CLASS IS RESTRICTED to students who have formally applied to and been accepted to the Immigrants' Rights and Human Trafficking Program. In this seminar, students will further develop their trial advocacy and client counseling skills by participating in multiple simulations and a mock hearing. They will learn about comparative models to address human trafficking, and the challenges of a criminal justice framework to solving complex social problems. The course will focus on the lawyer's role in anti-trafficking work, given: (1) converging areas of law; (2) the emerging multi-disciplinary nature of legal work; and (3) tensions among the role of the client as both victim and defendant. Courses will focus on further developing students' competencies in the following areas: (1) strategic planning and decision-making; (2) client interviewing and counseling; (3) trial advocacy; (4) leadership and innovation; and (5) professional responsibility. Classes will focus on a wide range of topics, including: (1) oral advocacy; (2) direct and cross examination; (3) accompaniment and survivor-led advocacy; (4) legal advocacy and brief writing; (4) legislative advocacy; and (5) developing professional roles and self-care. NOTE: The Immigrants' Rights and Human Trafficking Program counts toward the 6 credit Experiential Learning requirement. GRADING NOTICE: This course does not offer the CR/NC/H option.

SPRG 2019: LAW JD 817 A1 , Jan 15th to Apr 23rd 2019
Days Start End Credits Instructors Bldg
Tue 2:10 pm 4:10 pm 3 Julie A. Dahlstrom

3 credits

THIS CLASS IS RESTRICTED to students who have formally applied to and been accepted to the Immigrants' Rights and Human Trafficking Program. Students have three fieldwork options: (1) concentration in immigrants' rights; (2) concentration in human trafficking; or (3) work on both types of cases. Students focusing on immigrants' rights will represent adult and children asylum seekers and other vulnerable noncitizens with the opportunity to litigate an immigration case in the Boston Immigration Court. Students focusing on anti-trafficking work will represent survivors of labor and sex trafficking in a wide range of civil matters and engage in policy-related work to address gaps in the local and national landscape. Students focusing on both immigrants' rights and human trafficking will represent immigrant clients and survivors of human trafficking in a range of civil matters. All students will have the opportunity to engage in immigrants' rights and human trafficking work through "Know-Your-Rights" visits at the local jail/detention center and by conducting intake at the Family Justice Center for human trafficking survivors. Students, working in pairs, assume the primary responsibility for multiple clients' complex cases, from start to finish. Students conduct client interviews, track down witnesses, speak with experts, develop documentary, testimonial and expert evidence, and write legal briefs. The clinical supervisors prepare students for their cases through weekly supervision meetings, mid-semester and final individual meetings, and mock hearings, as appropriate. NOTE: The Immigrants' Rights and Human Trafficking Program counts toward the 6 credit Experiential Learning requirement. PRE/CO-REQUISITE: Evidence. GRADING NOTICE: This course does not offer the CR/NC/H option.

FALL 2018: LAW JD 859 A1 , Sep 4th to Dec 6th 2018
Days Start End Credits Instructors Bldg
ARR TBD TBD 3 Julie A. DahlstromSarah R. Sherman-Stokes
SPRG 2019: LAW JD 859 A1 , Jan 15th to Apr 24th 2019
Days Start End Credits Instructors Bldg
ARR TBD TBD 3 Julie A. DahlstromSarah R. Sherman-Stokes

3 credits

THIS CLASS IS RESTRICTED to students who have formally applied to and been accepted to the Immigrants' Rights and Human Trafficking Program. The seminar is the fall companion course for students enrolled in the Program. It provides a practice-oriented introduction to advocacy on behalf of indigent clients, including noncitizens and survivors of human trafficking. Students will develop a wide range of competencies with classes focusing topics including: (1) client interviewing and counseling; (2) case planning; (3) legal research and writing; (4) cultural competency; (5) legal story-telling and developing a theory of the case; (6) affidavit writing; (7) vicarious and secondary trauma; and (8) professional responsibility. Students will participate in class simulations, present in case rounds, and actively engage in facilitated discussions. There also will be two boot camp classes for students with specialized training in the following areas: (1) immigration law with a focus on asylum law and representing vulnerable noncitizens; and (2) human trafficking law with a focus on the protection framework in the Trafficking Victims Protection Act and multi-disciplinary lawyering. NOTE: The Immigrants' Rights and Human Trafficking Program counts toward the 6 credit Experiential Learning requirement. GRADING NOTICE: This course does not offer the CR/NC/H option.

FALL 2018: LAW JD 882 A1 , Sep 5th to Dec 5th 2018
Days Start End Credits Instructors Bldg
Wed 2:10 pm 4:10 pm 3 Julie A. DahlstromSarah R. Sherman-Stokes

3 credits

THIS CLASS IS RESTRICTED to students who have formally applied to and been accepted to the Immigrants' Rights and Human Trafficking Program. In this seminar, students will further develop their trial advocacy skills by participating in multiple mock hearings and portions of simulated trials. In particular, this course will focus on developing students' competencies in the following topics: (1) witness preparation, including working with lay and expert witnesses; (2) oral advocacy, including direct/cross examination and opening and closing statements; (3) factual and legal research; (4) cross-cultural lawyering and implicit bias; (5) legal advocacy and brief writing; (6) basic negotiation; and (7) developing professional roles and identities. Students will also be introduced to the intersections between criminal and immigration law, and to law and organizing in the immigration context. NOTE: The Immigrants' Rights and Human Trafficking Program counts toward the 6 credit Experiential Learning requirement. GRADING NOTICE: This course does not offer the CR/NC/H option.

SPRG 2019: LAW JD 888 A1 , Jan 16th to Apr 24th 2019
Days Start End Credits Instructors Bldg
Wed 2:10 pm 4:10 pm 3 Sarah R. Sherman-Stokes

3 credits

THIS CLASS IS RESTRICTED to students who have formally applied to and been accepted to the International and Human Rights Clinic. This is the companion spring classroom component for students in the Clinic. The course focuses on further developing skills directly tied to students' ongoing fieldwork. Classes will cover: interviewing and counseling institutional (non-governmental organizations) clients; designing and implementing human rights field research; ethical pitfalls and professional 'best practices' in human rights collaborations with international networks; advocacy within the UN machinery; advocacy within selected regional human rights mechanisms; and in-depth research workshops using comparative and foreign human rights research problems. The classes will be a combination of readings and discussion; simulations; student presentations; short papers and case rounds to discuss project work; and group and individual feedback on project development. NOTE: The International Human Rights Clinic counts toward the 6 credit Experiential Learning requirement. GRADING NOTICE: This course does not offer the CR/NC/H option.

SPRG 2019: LAW JD 843 A1 , Jan 16th to Apr 24th 2019
Days Start End Credits Instructors Bldg
Wed 2:10 pm 4:10 pm 3 Susan M. AkramStaff

3 credits

THIS CLASS IS RESTRICTED to students who have formally applied to and been accepted to the International and Human Rights Clinic. Students in the Clinic work on human rights projects such as: working with NGO's in advocacy in the UN human rights system or in regional organs (e.g. Inter-American and European human rights bodies); filing briefs on human rights law issues in US domestic courts; counseling individual clients with human rights claims and without recourse within a domestic jurisdiction. While the nature of the fieldwork varies from year to year, the clinic has previously partnered with domestic and international NGOs on the Guantanamo cases, habeas cases, and Alien Tort Claims Act cases; drafted submissions to UN treaty bodies; and worked on the health and human rights aspects of humanitarian crises. Students conduct legal and factual research, conduct outreach to partners and project strategy development, and may prepare amicus briefs on human rights issues and appeals in human rights cases. The clinic fieldwork may include international travel. In the fall, students attend a weekly course, arranged in accordance with the students' schedules, to gain a structured introduction to human rights practitioners' work. NOTE: The International Human Rights Clinic count towards the 6 credit Experiential Learning requirement. GRADING NOTICE: This course does not offer the CR/NC/H option.

FALL 2018: LAW JD 975 A1 , Sep 5th to Dec 5th 2018
Days Start End Credits Instructors Bldg
Wed 2:10 pm 4:10 pm 3 Susan M. AkramStaff
SPRG 2019: LAW JD 975 A1 , Jan 14th to Apr 24th 2019
Days Start End Credits Instructors Bldg
ARR TBD TBD 3 Susan M. AkramStaff

3 credits

This seminar will explore issues which the students encounter in the cases which they litigate. The seminar will discuss the role of the parties in the criminal justice system and institutional problems that play a recurring role.

Var credits

This CLASS IS RESTRICTED to students who have applied to and been accepted to the Sex Crimes Practicum. Students receive credit for completing a sex-crimes related project -- either litigation or policy-oriented -- as a supplement to the Sex Crimes seminar. Projects will vary in scope and content based on student interest and the number of students enrolled. Project topics include sex crime policy, the identification and tracking of constitutional challenges to civil laws, and work on pending cases such as registration hearing, civil commitment trials, or criminal appeals. Throughout the semester, students will work under the supervision of Professor Eric Tennen. Practicum students must attend six class meetings with Professor Tennen. Students receive either 1 or 2 graded credits depending on the nature of the project and the anticipated workload. NOTE: This clinic counts toward the 6 credit Experiential Learning requirement. PRE-/CO-REQUISITE: Sex Crimes (JD 947), or equivalent work experience or academic foundation, determined on a case-by-case basis by the instructor. GRADING NOTICE: This course does not offer the CR/NC/H option.

FALL 2018: LAW JD 962 A1 , Sep 4th to Dec 12th 2018
Days Start End Credits Instructors Bldg
ARR TBD TBD Var Eric Tennen
FALL 2018: LAW JD 962 B1 , Sep 4th to Dec 12th 2018
Days Start End Credits Instructors Bldg
ARR TBD TBD Var Eric Tennen

3 credits

This course introduces the student to the structure of the trial process and the skills used by trial lawyers. The topics covered range from opening statements to closing arguments, including conducting direct and cross-examination of witnesses, making and meeting objections, introducing documents and discovery into evidence, and using hypothetical questions with expert witnesses. Students must perform simulated exercises and will try one or more civil or criminal cases before a jury. Visit the web for more information on the instructors. PREREQUISITE: EVIDENCE. Students taking TRIAL ADVOCACY in the second semester of their third year may take EVIDENCE as a COREQUISITE. Students who have taken a trial advocacy course as part of a clinic may not subsequently enroll in Trial Advocacy. ENROLLMENT LIMIT: 12 students. GRADING NOTICE: This course does not offer the CR/NC/H option. NOTE: This course counts toward the 6 credit Experiential Learning requirement. ** A student who fails either to attend the initial meeting of a section of Trial Advocacy, or to obtain permission to be absent from either the instructor or the registrar, WILL BE administratively dropped from the section. Students who are on a wait list for a section are required to attend the first section meeting to be considered for enrollment.

FALL 2018: LAW JD 894 A1 , Sep 10th to Dec 3rd 2018
Days Start End Credits Instructors Bldg
Wed 6:00 pm 8:50 pm 3 Angel Kelley Brown
SPRG 2019: LAW JD 894 A2 , Jan 16th to Apr 24th 2019
Days Start End Credits Instructors Bldg
Wed 4:30 pm 7:20 pm 3 F. Dennis Saylor
SPRG 2019: LAW JD 894 W1 , Jan 15th to Apr 23rd 2019
Days Start End Credits Instructors Bldg
Tue 5:00 pm 7:50 pm 3 Fred Wyshak

3 credits

The purpose of this course is to enable students to further develop the skills acquired during the basic trial advocacy course and to introduce them to issues that are not generally addressed at the basic level. Those issues will include motions in limine, impaneling a jury, trial notebooks, effective use of experts, trial technology, preserving the record for appellate purposes and further developing direct and cross-examinations skills. This will be accomplished by using the entire case file used by counsel in a 1992 murder trial, Commonwealth v Fuller in Essex County, MA. The class will be divided into two teams: a prosecution team and a defense team. The case is evenly weighted so no team will have a built-in advantage. Each team will work together to address the issues facing that team. There will be plenty of opportunity for individual in-class demonstrations of various trial skills, including writing and arguing motions in limine, direct and cross examinations of an expert, etc. The students will learn that much of trial advocacy involves "brainstorming" the issues with one's peers, particularly during the early stages of a case. Accordingly, the course will be frontloaded with group discussion of the various issues facing the trial lawyer before the first juror is impaneled. The final exam of this course will be a mock trial of a case, one that is much more compact than the Fuller case. This trial will provide an excellent opportunity for the students to demonstrate the complete range of their trial skills. GRADING NOTICE: This course does not offer the CR/NC/H option. NOTE: This course counts toward the 6 credit Experiential Learning requirement. *** A student who fails either to attend the initial meeting of Trial Advocacy (Advanced), or to obtain permission to be absent from either the instructor or the registrar, will be administratively dropped from the section. Students who are on a wait list for a section are required to attend the first section meeting to be considered for enrollment.

SPRG 2019: LAW JD 945 A1 , Jan 17th to Apr 18th 2019
Days Start End Credits Instructors Bldg
Thu 4:30 pm 7:20 pm 3 Elizabeth M. Fahey

Drafting Courses

3 credits

This course is the foundational skills course within the Transactional Law Program. It teaches students basic principles and skills of drafting and analyzing commercial and transaction agreements, with a focus on recognizing, and addressing through contractual provisions, key business issues in transactions. Although the course will be of particular interest to students interested in a corporate or transactional law practice, since most practicing attorneys will need to work with contracts at some point in their career, the concepts and skills which the course conveys are applicable to virtually all practice areas and specialties. While the course utilizes lectures to introduce various contract concepts and techniques essential for drafting and reviewing commercial and transaction agreements, it requires that students complete in-class exercises and extensive homework assignments as a means of building basic drafting skills and a solid understanding of the structure and operation of contractual provisions in a business transaction. Grades will be based on the graded assignments, good faith completion of ungraded assignments, and class participation. ENROLLMENT LIMIT: 12 students. NOTE: This class counts toward the 6 credit Experiential Learning requirement. GRADING NOTICE: This class will not offer the CR/NC/H option. ATTENDANCE REQUIREMENT: A student who fails to attend the first class or to obtain permission to be absent from either the instructor or the Registrar, will be administratively dropped from the class. Students who are on the wait list for a section are required to attend the first meeting to be considered for enrollment.

FALL 2018: LAW JD 788 A1 , Sep 10th to Dec 3rd 2018
Days Start End Credits Instructors Bldg
Tue 4:20 pm 6:20 pm 3 Yael D. DeCapo
FALL 2018: LAW JD 788 B1 , Sep 10th to Dec 3rd 2018
Days Start End Credits Instructors Bldg
Tue 6:30 pm 8:30 pm 3 Marc Angelone
FALL 2018: LAW JD 788 C1 , Sep 5th to Dec 5th 2018
Days Start End Credits Instructors Bldg
Wed 4:20 pm 6:20 pm 3 Thomas P. Harrison
FALL 2018: LAW JD 788 D1 , Sep 5th to Dec 5th 2018
Days Start End Credits Instructors Bldg
Wed 6:30 pm 8:30 pm 3 William J. Squires, III
FALL 2018: LAW JD 788 E1 , Sep 6th to Dec 6th 2018
Days Start End Credits Instructors Bldg
Thu 10:40 am 12:40 pm 3 Cecily Banks
FALL 2018: LAW JD 788 F1 , Sep 5th to Dec 5th 2018
Days Start End Credits Instructors Bldg
Wed 4:20 pm 6:20 pm 3 Christina R. Schaper
SPRG 2019: LAW JD 788 A2 , Jan 14th to Apr 22nd 2019
Days Start End Credits Instructors Bldg
Mon 4:20 pm 6:20 pm 3 Carla Moynihan
SPRG 2019: LAW JD 788 B2 , Jan 15th to Apr 23rd 2019
Days Start End Credits Instructors Bldg
Tue 4:20 pm 6:20 pm 3 Neal S. Winneg
SPRG 2019: LAW JD 788 C2 , Jan 15th to Apr 23rd 2019
Days Start End Credits Instructors Bldg
Tue 6:30 pm 8:30 pm 3 John F. Cohan
SPRG 2019: LAW JD 788 D2 , Jan 17th to Apr 18th 2019
Days Start End Credits Instructors Bldg
Thu 10:40 am 12:40 pm 3 Cecily Banks

1 credits

Students enrolled in the spring section of Trusts & Estates have the option of enrolling in this one-credit Writing Supplement. Designed for students who are interested in practicing in the areas covered by the course, these one-credit supplements are taught by experienced attorneys who practice in these areas. In collaboration with the professor teaching the substantive course, the practitioner instructs students in drafting documents related to the substantive coursework. Writing sections consist of one introductory meeting and a number of follow up meetings (specific dates TBD) to discuss drafts in progress. Because enrollment is limited, you will receive substantial feedback and individualized instruction. Students enrolled in the spring section of Trusts & Estates have the option of enrolling in this one-credit Writing Supplement. Designed for students who are interested in practicing in the areas covered by the course, these one-credit supplements are taught by experienced attorneys who practice in these areas. In collaboration with the professor teaching the substantive course, the practitioner instructs students in drafting documents related to the substantive coursework. Writing sections consist of one introductory meeting and a number of follow up meetings (specific dates TBD) to discuss drafts in progress. Because enrollment is limited, you will receive substantial feedback and individualized instruction. NOTE: This course satisfies the upper-class Professional Skills requirement and counts toward the 6 credit Experiential Learning requirement.

Legal Research Courses

1 credits

Many practice areas, from environmental law to immigration law, are heavily regulatory. Learn about the structure of administrative law research, from enabling statutes to agency adjudication, in this class. The class will focus on developing your understanding of the structure of administrative agencies and using the various sources of administrative law. You will learn what information is available from government sources and what specialty publishers bring to the table with an emphasis on being cost effective in the workplace. Classes will combine instruction and hands-on exercises using the major print, electronic and web based resources in administrative law. NOTE: Students may not add this course after the first class has been held. ENROLLMENT LIMIT: 16 students ATTENDANCE REQUIREMENT: A student who fails to attend the first class or to obtain permission to be absent from either the instructor or the Registrar, will be administratively dropped from the class. Students who are on the wait list are required to attend the first meeting to be considered for enrollment. Meeting dates -- October 10 to November 14, 2018.

FALL 2018: LAW JD 763 A1 , Sep 5th to Dec 12th 2018
Days Start End Credits Instructors Bldg
Wed 8:30 am 10:30 am 1 Ellen Frentzen

1 credits

Banking law has been at the epicenter of recent economic events and major reforms have been passed by Congress and now need to be implemented. Learn how to find laws and regulations, use specialized practice materials and search for agency issuances, among other research tasks. Lawyers practicing banking law often use licensed products other than LexisNexis, Westlaw and Bloomberg in their offices. Students will become familiar with these products in this class. Classes will combine instruction and hands-on exercises using major print, electronic, and web based resources for banking law research. Students will be required to complete an assignment for every class using electronic and print resources. NOTE: This seminar satisfies the Upper-class Professional Skills requirement. NOTE: Students may not add this course after the first class has been held. This course meets from 1/20/2016 to 2/24/2016.

1 credits

Health law encompasses the engagement of the legal system with a large and dynamic segment of the U.S. economy. In this class, students will gain a familiarity with how to navigate the statutory and regulatory framework of health law, how to evaluate resources, and how complex and multi-part search strategies may be applied to research problems. Students will also gain a deeper understanding of databases beyond Lexis, Westlaw and Bloomberg, and of current awareness sources. Classes will combine instruction and hands-on exercises using print, electronic, and web-based resources. Students will be evaluated on several grounds, including class participation, regular assignments, and a short paper and presentation. NOTE: This class counts toward the 6 credit Experiential Learning requirement. NOTE: Students may not add this course after the first class has been held. ATTENDANCE REQUIREMENT: A student who fails to attend the first class or to obtain permission to be absent from either the instructor or the Registrar, will be administratively dropped from the class. Students who are on the wait list are required to attend the first meeting to be considered for enrollment. Meeting Dates: February 27 to April 10, 2019.

SPRG 2019: LAW JD 717 A1 , Feb 27th to Apr 10th 2019
Days Start End Credits Instructors Bldg
Wed 4:20 pm 6:20 pm 1 Jenna Fegreus

1 credits

Intellectual property is a multi-faceted area of practice where it is especially important to be able to keep up with current developments. Students will become familiar with practitioners' tools as well as learning the role of legislative history, sources for securing intellectual property rights and patent and trademark searching. Legal information and technologies are constantly changing, and firms are constantly licensing new databases. Become familiar with the specialized tools used by lawyers in intellectual property practices. Classes will combine instruction and hands-on exercises using major print, electronic, and web based resources for intellectual property law research. NOTE: This class satisfies the upper-class Professional Skills requirement and counts toward the 6 credit Experiential Learning requirement. NOTE: Students may not add this course after the first class has been held. ATTENDANCE REQUIREMENT: A student who fails to attend the first class or to obtain permission to be absent from either the instructor or the Registrar, will be administratively dropped from the class. Students who are on the wait list are required to attend the first meeting to be considered for enrollment. This course meets January 16 through February 20, 2019.

SPRG 2019: LAW JD 733 A1 , Jan 16th to Feb 20th 2019
Days Start End Credits Instructors Bldg
Wed 4:20 pm 6:20 pm 1 Shira Megerman

2 credits

An important component of understanding international law is mastering all the diverse sources of this area of law. Students will learn to navigate the international system as well as the relevant primary sources of law. Student will learn research strategies and skills for locating treaties, decisions of international tribunals, documents of international organizations and other sources of state practice. Among the organizations the course will discuss the United Nations, the OAS, the EU and the WTO. In addition, students will be introduced to strategies for researching the law of foreign jurisdictions. Students will gain hands-on experience in answering legal research questions in the area of international and comparative law. Classes will combine instruction and hands-on exercises using major print, electronic, and web based resources for international law research. NOTE: This class counts toward the 6 credit Experiential Learning requirement. ATTENDANCE REQUIREMENT: A student who fails to attend the first class or to obtain permission to be absent from either the instructor or the Registrar, will be administratively dropped from the class. Students who are on the wait list are required to attend the first meeting to be considered for enrollment.

SPRG 2019: LAW JD 748 A1 , Jan 15th to Apr 23rd 2019
Days Start End Credits Instructors Bldg
Tue 4:20 pm 6:20 pm 2 TBA

1 credits

This CLASS IS RESTRICTED to students who have received permission from the Clinical and Experiential Programs Office to enroll. This is the companion academic component for students simultaneously enrolled in the Judicial Externship: Fieldwork course. The seminar focuses on teaching the substance and skills related to being a successful judicial extern. Topics include judicial ethics, legal research, judicial process, opinion drafting, judicial selection and recusal, and judicial decision-making. Students keep reflective journals chronicling their educational experience and reactions to the practice of law observed at the field placement. Please note that the course is scheduled to meet for seven two-hour class sessions, every other week. NOTE: Students who enroll in this externship may count the credits toward the 6 credit Experiential Learning requirement. COREQUISITE: Judicial Externship: Fieldwork (JD 735). GRADING NOTICE: This class does not offer the CR/NC/H option.

FALL 2018: LAW JD 734 A1 , Sep 6th to Dec 6th 2018
Days Start End Credits Instructors Bldg
Thu 4:20 pm 6:20 pm 1 Vickie L. Henry
SPRG 2019: LAW JD 734 A1 , Jan 15th to Apr 23rd 2019
Days Start End Credits Instructors Bldg
Tue 5:30 pm 7:30 pm 1 Staff

1 credits

Tax law research is among the most complicated areas of the law to research. Statutes, regulations and agency issuances interact to create a thickly layered set of legal precedents. This class will explore the resources a tax professional would use to perform his or her research from legislative history to private letter rulings. Students will become familiar with the research platforms outside of Lexis and Westlaw that are commonly used in practice. Students will get practice in using many of the most heavily used practice materials. Classes will combine instruction and hands-on exercises using the major print and electronic resources available for tax law research. Students will be required to complete an assignment for each class. NOTE: This seminar satisfies the upper-class professional skills requirement. NOTE: Students may not add this course after the first class has been held. This course meets October 26 through December 7, 2016.

Legal Writing Courses

3 credits

The purpose of this seminar is to provide students with the opportunity to improve their writing, editing and communication skills. Students will prepare a variety of practice related documents based on a single fact pattern. Some legal research will be necessary, but the emphasis will be on writing, not on research. Students will also have the opportunity to edit other students' papers, with the goal of improving their own writing skills. Actors will perform a scenario for the class, from which students will extract the pertinent facts. From this fact pattern, students will draft an inter-office memo, a letter or memo to a non-lawyer client, and a trial or appellate brief. Students will also engage in simulated client interviewing and counseling sessions, as well as a simulated meeting with a supervisor. Students will be graded on the basis of their written work, editing work on their classmate's papers and on their classroom performance. There will be no final exam. NOTES: This class does not satisfy the upper-class writing requirement. This class counts toward the 6 credit Experiential Learning requirement. GRADING NOTICE: This class will not offer the CR/NC/H option. ENROLLMENT LIMIT: 14 students. ** A student who fails to attend the initial meeting of a seminar (designated by an (S) in the title), or to obtain permission to be absent from either the instructor or the Registrar, may be administratively dropped from the seminar. Students who are on a wait list for a seminar are required to attend the first seminar meeting to be considered for enrollment.

FALL 2018: LAW JD 874 A1 , Sep 6th to Dec 6th 2018
Days Start End Credits Instructors Bldg
Thu 2:10 pm 4:10 pm 3 Constance A. BrowneStaff

2 credits

This course will focus on writing styles and formats unique to the judicial process, such as the bench memo and appellate majority and dissenting opinion. Classes will provide a general overview of the opinion writing function with emphasis on topics such as opinion structure, judicial writing style, the relationship between style and substance, the use of narrative and rhetorical techniques, and ethical considerations in opinion writing. Through a series of writing assignments and in-class exercises, students will learn to how to diagnose and revise difficult and unclear writing, acquire techniques for writing more economically, precisely and unambiguously, and hone their skills in structuring and organizing, analyzing, and writing persuasively. In analyzing judicial opinions and writing from the perspective of a judge rather than an advocate, students will gain a deeper understanding of the judicial process and will become better critical readers and users of judicial opinions. ENROLLMENT LIMIT: 14 students. NOTES: This class does not satisfy the upper-class writing requirement. ** A student who fails to attend the initial meeting of a seminar (designated by an (S) in the title), or to obtain permission to be absent from either the instructor or the Registrar, may be administratively dropped from the seminar. Students who are on a wait list for a seminar are required to attend the first seminar meeting to be considered for enrollment.

SPRG 2019: LAW JD 711 A1 , Jan 16th to Apr 24th 2019
Days Start End Credits Instructors Bldg
Wed 4:20 pm 6:20 pm 2 Leslie F. Su

3 credits

This class is designed to give students experience in legal writing civil litigation. Over the course of the semester, students will work on the various stages of a federal court litigation from pre-complaint investigation through dispositive motions. There will opportunities to draft a variety of litigation documents, including complaints, discovery, motions, and memos. Students will complete multiple drafts of key documents and will meet individually with the instructor to discuss the drafts. Students will focus on using the facts to tell their clients' story and making persuasive, winning arguments. In class, students will discuss a range of strategic questions including developing viable causes of action, identifying critical facts, and using written discovery to obtain information. Additionally, students will participate in-class exercises designed to improve the students' skills in writing, fact-gathering and argument. ENROLLMENT LIMIT: 14 students NOTES: This class does not satisfy the upper-class writing requirement. GRADING NOTICE: This class does not offer the CR/NC/H option. ** A student who fails to attend the initial meeting of a seminar (designated by an (S) in the title), or to obtain permission to be absent from either the instructor or the Registrar, may be administratively dropped from the seminar. Students who are on a wait list for a seminar are required to attend the first seminar meeting to be considered for enrollment.

FALL 2018: LAW JD 712 A1 , Sep 10th to Dec 3rd 2018
Days Start End Credits Instructors Bldg
Mon 6:30 pm 8:30 pm 3 Edward J. DeAngelo

3 credits

This seminar will focus on improving students' persuasive writing skills through a series of assignments and in-class exercises. Students will draft a variety of documents designed to persuade, including a statement of the facts and memos in support of motions. Some legal research will be necessary for these assignments, but the emphasis will be on writing, not on research. Students will complete multiple drafts of these documents, meet individually with the instructor to discuss the drafts, and engage in peer editing of their classmates' papers to improve their own writing skills. The class will also include discussions of persuasive writing strategies, comparisons of examples of good and bad persuasive writing, and in-class writing exercises. Students will be graded on the basis of their written work, their peer editing work, and on their classroom participation. There will be no final exam. ENROLLMENT LIMIT: 14 students. NOTES: This class does not satisfy the upper-class writing requirement. ** A student who fails to attend the initial meeting of a seminar (designated by an (S) in the title), or to obtain permission to be absent from either the instructor or the Registrar, may be administratively dropped from the seminar. Students who are on a wait list for a seminar are required to attend the first seminar meeting to be considered for enrollment.

SPRG 2019: LAW JD 713 A1 , Jan 14th to Apr 22nd 2019
Days Start End Credits Instructors Bldg
Mon 10:40 am 12:40 pm 3 Holly Jane Caldwell

Transactional Law Courses

3 credits

This course is the foundational skills course within the Transactional Law Program. It teaches students basic principles and skills of drafting and analyzing commercial and transaction agreements, with a focus on recognizing, and addressing through contractual provisions, key business issues in transactions. Although the course will be of particular interest to students interested in a corporate or transactional law practice, since most practicing attorneys will need to work with contracts at some point in their career, the concepts and skills which the course conveys are applicable to virtually all practice areas and specialties. While the course utilizes lectures to introduce various contract concepts and techniques essential for drafting and reviewing commercial and transaction agreements, it requires that students complete in-class exercises and extensive homework assignments as a means of building basic drafting skills and a solid understanding of the structure and operation of contractual provisions in a business transaction. Grades will be based on the graded assignments, good faith completion of ungraded assignments, and class participation. ENROLLMENT LIMIT: 12 students. NOTE: This class counts toward the 6 credit Experiential Learning requirement. GRADING NOTICE: This class will not offer the CR/NC/H option. ATTENDANCE REQUIREMENT: A student who fails to attend the first class or to obtain permission to be absent from either the instructor or the Registrar, will be administratively dropped from the class. Students who are on the wait list for a section are required to attend the first meeting to be considered for enrollment.

FALL 2018: LAW JD 788 A1 , Sep 10th to Dec 3rd 2018
Days Start End Credits Instructors Bldg
Tue 4:20 pm 6:20 pm 3 Yael D. DeCapo
FALL 2018: LAW JD 788 B1 , Sep 10th to Dec 3rd 2018
Days Start End Credits Instructors Bldg
Tue 6:30 pm 8:30 pm 3 Marc Angelone
FALL 2018: LAW JD 788 C1 , Sep 5th to Dec 5th 2018
Days Start End Credits Instructors Bldg
Wed 4:20 pm 6:20 pm 3 Thomas P. Harrison
FALL 2018: LAW JD 788 D1 , Sep 5th to Dec 5th 2018
Days Start End Credits Instructors Bldg
Wed 6:30 pm 8:30 pm 3 William J. Squires, III
FALL 2018: LAW JD 788 E1 , Sep 6th to Dec 6th 2018
Days Start End Credits Instructors Bldg
Thu 10:40 am 12:40 pm 3 Cecily Banks
FALL 2018: LAW JD 788 F1 , Sep 5th to Dec 5th 2018
Days Start End Credits Instructors Bldg
Wed 4:20 pm 6:20 pm 3 Christina R. Schaper
SPRG 2019: LAW JD 788 A2 , Jan 14th to Apr 22nd 2019
Days Start End Credits Instructors Bldg
Mon 4:20 pm 6:20 pm 3 Carla Moynihan
SPRG 2019: LAW JD 788 B2 , Jan 15th to Apr 23rd 2019
Days Start End Credits Instructors Bldg
Tue 4:20 pm 6:20 pm 3 Neal S. Winneg
SPRG 2019: LAW JD 788 C2 , Jan 15th to Apr 23rd 2019
Days Start End Credits Instructors Bldg
Tue 6:30 pm 8:30 pm 3 John F. Cohan
SPRG 2019: LAW JD 788 D2 , Jan 17th to Apr 18th 2019
Days Start End Credits Instructors Bldg
Thu 10:40 am 12:40 pm 3 Cecily Banks

3 credits

This course is one of the semester-long transaction simulations offered as part of the School's Transactional Law Program and satisfies the Transaction Simulation requirement of the Transactional Practice Concentration. The simulated transaction involves the sale of an urban site in Cambridge, MA comprised of buildings currently or previously occupied by commercial tenants which is to be re-developed into a high-end mixed-use multi-family and retail building. The course is intended to expose students to various transactional, regulatory and other issues faced, and lawyering tasks undertaken, by both junior and more senior attorneys in this type of transaction, and to enable students, in performing these tasks, to develop important practice skills in the area of commercial real estate. The class will be divided into teams at various stages of the transaction, with each team representing the buyer or the seller, regarding the acquisition of the property, or the local developer or capital partner regarding forming the venture that will acquire this property. Students will perform the key analytical, drafting and other legal tasks required to effectively represent their respective clients during various stages of the transaction from inception through closing. Throughout the semester students will be able to interact with a variety of real estate developers and experts. The course grade will be based on periodic drafting, negotiating and other written assignments (both in-class and homework), contributions to team efforts, and individual class participation. CLASS SIZE: Limited to 12 students. NOTES: This course counts toward the 6 credit Experiential Learning requirement. The class will also satisfy the Transaction Simulation requirement of the Transactional Practice Concentration. GRADING NOTICE: This course does not offer the CR/NC/H option. ATTENDANCE REQUIREMENT: A student who fails to attend the first class or to obtain permission to be absent from either the instructor or the Registrar, will be administratively dropped from the class. Students who are on the wait list are required to attend the first meeting to be considered for enrollment.

SPRG 2019: LAW JD 774 A1 , Jan 16th to Apr 24th 2019
Days Start End Credits Instructors Bldg
Wed 4:20 pm 6:20 pm 3 Lawrence UchillRobert Fishman

3 credits

This course is one of the semester-long transaction simulations offered as part of the School's Transactional Law Program and satisfies the Transaction Simulation Requirement of the Transactional Practice Concentration. The simulated transaction is the auction and sale of a privately-held company in the single-cup coffee brewing industry. The course exposes students to the primary tasks undertaken by both junior and more senior attorneys in a private company auction and sale, and in doing so builds skills students will need as they enter transactional practice. Students will perform analytical, drafting and other legal tasks during each stage of the transaction from inception through closing, including revising and negotiating final terms of a merger agreement for the proposed transaction and preparing the related disclosure schedules. Much of the course work will be done in teams representing the company being sold or a potential purchaser of that company. The course grade will be based on drafting assignments, contributions to team efforts such as in-class presentations and negotiation sessions, and individual class participation. CLASS SIZE: Limited to 12 students. PREREQUISITE: Contract Drafting. PREREQUISITE or COREQUISITE: Corporations. NOTES: This course counts toward the 6 credit Experiential Learning requirement. The class will also satisfy the Transaction Simulation requirement of the Transactional Practice Concentration. GRADING NOTICE: This course does not offer the CR/NC/H option. ATTENDANCE REQUIREMENT: A student who fails to attend the first class or to obtain permission to be absent from either the instructor or the Registrar, will be administratively dropped from the class. Students who are on the wait list are required to attend the first meeting to be considered for enrollment.

SPRG 2019: LAW JD 773 A1 , Jan 16th to Apr 24th 2019
Days Start End Credits Instructors Bldg
Wed 2:10 pm 4:10 pm 3 Kent A. CoitAlan MacEwan

3 credits

This course is one of the semester-long transaction simulations offered as part of the School's Transactional Law Program. The simulated transaction is the formation and initial financing of a privately-held company in the software industry. The transaction will expose students to the principal issues in counseling entrepreneurs as to their emerging businesses, including key elements such as entity creation, duties of management and control among owners, equity compensation, intellectual property protection, capital raising through preferred stock financing, and financing-related contracts based on industry-standard models. Through in-class discussions and graded homework assignments, students will simulate the work of practicing attorneys (both junior and senior) who counsel start-ups and their founders on a day-to-day basis. The course grade will be based on three drafting homework assignments, contributions in class, and a group project focused on a self-selected current topic. CLASS SIZE: Limited to 12 students. PREREQUISITE: Corporations. NOTES: This course counts toward the 6 credit Experiential Learning requirement. The class will also satisfy the Transaction Simulation requirement of the Transactional Practice Concentration. GRADING NOTICE: This course does not offer the CR/NC/H option. ATTENDANCE REQUIREMENT: A student who fails to attend the first class or to obtain permission to be absent from either the instructor or the Registrar, will be administratively dropped from the class. Students who are on the wait list are required to attend the first meeting to be considered for enrollment.

SPRG 2019: LAW JD 789 A1 , Jan 17th to Apr 18th 2019
Days Start End Credits Instructors Bldg
Thu 6:30 pm 8:30 pm 3 Daniel P. WhiteJay Sullivan

3 credits

This course is one of the semester-long transaction simulations offered as part of the School's Transactional Law Program and satisfies the Transactional Simulation requirement of the Transactional Practice Concentration. The simulated transaction involves two companies, one a large U.S.-based pharmaceutical company, and the other an African company majority owned by the government. The two companies are interested in working together to produce and commercialize a plant-based product which may be effective in treating, and possibly even preventing, arthritis. The pharmaceutical company has developed and patented a process to extract the active ingredient from the plant which is available in ample supply from the African company. The form of their collaboration could be a joint venture, a licensing agreement or a long term supply contract. For much of the course, the class will be divided into two teams, with each team representing one of the parties to the potential transaction. Negotiations between the two teams will take place through written exchanges and real-time negotiation. The course provides students with an opportunity to gain insight into the dynamics of negotiating and structuring business transactions, to learn about the role that lawyers, law and business play in these negotiations, and to develop experience in drafting communications and actual negotiations. Students will also learn about the legal and business issues that may arise in joint ventures, supply agreements and licensing agreements, particularly in an international transaction. CLASS SIZE: Limited to 12 students (6 JD and 6 LLM). PREREQUISITE OR COREQUISITE: Corporations. NOTES: This course counts toward the 6 credit Experiential Learning requirement. The class will also satisfy the Transaction Simulation requirement of the Transactional Practice Concentration. GRADING NOTICE: This course does not offer the CR/NC/H option. ATTENDANCE REQUIREMENT: A student who fails to attend the first class and does not obtain permission to be absent from either the Instructor or the Registrar will be administratively dropped from the class. Students who are on the wait list for the class are required to attend the first meeting to be considered for enrollment.

SPRG 2019: LAW JD 783 A1 , Jan 17th to Apr 18th 2019
Days Start End Credits Instructors Bldg
Thu 4:20 pm 6:20 pm 3 Stephen J. DoyleClaudia J. Gilman

3 credits

This course is one of the semester-long transaction simulations offered as part of the School's Transactional Law Program and satisfies the Transaction Simulation requirement of the Transactional Practice Concentration. The simulated transaction involves the consolidation of ownership of a family-owned retail drugstore company in a manner and through agreements that address the differing expectations and interests of the company's two shareholders: (i) the company's chief executive and majority owner seeking to obtain sole ownership of the business, including interests in real estate used in the business and (ii) his sister, a minority shareholder not active in the business, seeking a risk-free separation from the business and an assured pay-out. The course will consider the respective rights and obligations of these two shareholders as majority and minority owners in a closely held business. The course will also address issues involved in commercial real estate leasing and financing, including negotiating a commercial lease, mortgage and mortgage note from the perspective of each party. The course is intended to expose students to the principal tasks undertaken, and issues faced, by both junior and more senior attorneys in this type of transaction, and in doing so to build skills students will need as they enter transactional practice. The class will be divided into teams, with each team representing one of the participants in the transaction. Students will perform the key analytical, drafting and other legal tasks required to effectively represent their respective clients during various stages of the transaction from inception through closing. The course grade will be based on periodic drafting and other written assignments (individual and the individual's portion of team or group assignments), individual contributions to other team or group efforts, and individual class participation (including oral reports). CLASS SIZE: Limited to 12 students. NOTES: This course counts toward the 6 credit Experiential Learning requirement. The class will also satisfy the Transaction Simulation requirement of the Transactional Practice Concentration. GRADING NOTICE: This class will not offer the CR/NC/H option. ATTENDANCE REQUIREMENT: A student who fails to attend the first class or to obtain permission to be absent from either the instructor or the Registrar, will be administratively dropped from the class. Students who are on the wait list are required to attend the first meeting to be considered for enrollment.

FALL 2018: LAW JD 772 A1 , Sep 5th to Dec 5th 2018
Days Start End Credits Instructors Bldg
Wed 2:10 pm 4:10 pm 3 Richard BlanksteinRichard H. Goldman

LLM-Only Courses

3 credits

The goal of this course is to improve the ability of internationally-trained LL.M. students to resolve disputes and to productively engage in conflict. In this highly interactive class, students will examine a variety of dispute resolution processes, other than traditional court adjudication, including negotiation, mediation, arbitration, dispute system design and restorative justice. Over the course of the semester, students will engage in a series of exercises (i.e., role-plays) through which they can develop and hone their skills and approaches to dispute resolution. Discussion and short lectures will accompany the exercises, as appropriate. There will be a series of short written assignments (2-3 pages). No final exam. ENROLLMENT LIMIT: 18 students.

FALL 2018: LAW JD 955 A1 , Sep 6th to Dec 6th 2018
Days Start End Credits Instructors Bldg
Thu 4:20 pm 6:20 pm 3 Arthur Pressman

2 credits

This class will introduce LL.M. students to appellate advocacy, both written and oral. To introduce students to persuasive writing -- a critical lawyering skill, applicable to a range of legal practice settings -- students will first draft a motion and memorandum in support thereof. Students will then draft an appellate brief and participate in an oral argument based on that brief. Students will write multiple drafts of each written assignment and will have the opportunity to meet with the instructor to discuss these drafts. The oral arguments will give students an opportunity to develop their speaking and presentation skills in simulated court setting. For students considering transferring into the J.D. program, this course will satisfy the J.D. Moot Court requirement. GRADING NOTICE: This class will not offer the CR/NC/H option.

SPRG 2019: LAW JD 909 A1 , Jan 28th to Apr 22nd 2019
Days Start End Credits Instructors Bldg
Mon 6:30 pm 7:45 pm 2 Eva M. Zelnick

2 credits

This course offers an approach to the lawyer's responsibilities to clients, the profession, and the public. Topics addressed will be problems of disclosure, conflict of interest, advertising, adversary tactics, competence, attorney fees, and fiduciary duties. GRADING NOTICE: This course does not offer the CR/NC/H option.

SPRG 2019: LAW JD 701 A1 , Jan 15th to Apr 23rd 2019
Days Start End Credits Instructors Bldg
Tue 4:20 pm 6:20 pm 2 Douglas Hauer
SPRG 2019: LAW JD 701 B1 , Jan 15th to Apr 23rd 2019
Days Start End Credits Instructors Bldg
Tue 4:20 pm 6:20 pm 2 Arthur Pressman

3 credits

This course is for foreign-trained LL.M. students. It teaches students basic principles and skills of drafting and analyzing transaction and other business agreements under U.S. law, with a focus on recognizing, and addressing through contractual provisions, key business issues in various transactional contexts, including asset purchases and sales, intellectual property licensing and employment agreements. While the course utilizes lectures to introduce various contract concepts and techniques essential for drafting and analyzing transaction and other commercial agreements, it requires that students complete in-class exercises and homework assignments as a means of building basic drafting skills and a solid understanding of the structure and operation of contractual provisions in a business transaction under U.S. law. Grades will be based on the graded assignments, good faith completion of ungraded assignments, and class participation. CLASS SIZE: Limited to 12 students. GRADING NOTICE: This class will not offer the CR/NC/H option.

SPRG 2019: LAW JD 719 D1 , Jan 17th to Apr 18th 2019
Days Start End Credits Instructors Bldg
Thu 6:30 pm 8:30 pm 3 Andrew A. Croxford