Welcome, all.

Open to everyone since the ’70s. The 1870s.

Since our founding in 1872, Boston University School of Law has offered legal education to all qualified students without regard to race, gender, or religion. In fact, we were one of the first to do so long before most schools—which is why many of our students have gone on to become “firsts” in their fields.

A network of support

BU Law’s commitment to a diverse student body begins well before you arrive on campus and extends far beyond graduation.

Before school: You’ll be connected with an upperclassman during the summer who can answer any questions you may have. Then you can choose to attend Be Yourself Orientation, a two-day series of welcome events for students of color, those that identify as LGBTQ, and their allies prior to general orientation.

As a student: You’ll find a well-developed system of support and mentorship to help you through your time in law school. Just a few of the people acting as resources for you include:

Faculty: In addition to your faculty advisor, who will help guide you in academic and professional decisions, you’ll be matched with a faculty mentor with common personal or career-related interests. You may also have the opportunity to act as a research assistant for or co-author a paper with a professor whose particular academic pursuits align with yours.

Administrators: Dean O’Rourke holds regular town halls, office hours, and other informal get-togethers as a platform for your voice. The very accessible Student Affairs Office offers numerous resources, both academic and personal, to support law students. And BU Law’s designated Associate Director for Academic & Multicultural Affairs, Brenda Hernandez, is dedicated to cultivating a community that welcomes diverse individuals and a wide range of beliefs, ideas, and opinions.

Upper-level students: BU Law is known for its exceptionally friendly community, and upper-level students are a driving force behind this reputation. Be it your official student advisor or an older student who, unprompted, emails you notes when you miss class, 2 and 3Ls look out for you, which not many law schools can say.

Student organizations: BU Law has more than 30 student organizations—including eight affinity groups—focused on personal issues, professional or special interests, and social pursuits. These groups often hold networking events with professionals in the community and alumni, which brings us to…

Alumni: BU Law’s network of nearly 24,000 alumni practicing in various fields around the globe is the ultimate career resource. You’ll be paired with an alumni mentor as a 1L to immediately benefit from the guidance and career advice of someone practicing in a field, sector, or geographic location of interest to you.

While job hunting: The Career Development & Public Service Office (CDO) will work closely with you to identify your career path and the steps you need to take to prepare for it. Your career advisor, an attorney who formerly practiced in the area of law in which you are interested, will introduce you to our robust recruiting programs, our vast alumni network, and the many other career resources available to you as a BU Law student.

As an alum: Support doesn’t stop at graduation. Not only will you have a tremendous professional network of BU Law alumni, the CDO continues to support graduates in their career searches, and programs like Loan Repayment Assistance Program offer loan forgiveness for alumni practicing in the public sector.

Programming and curriculum

BU Law also regularly holds programming designed to engage with pressing issues of diversity. For example, our Legacy Series provides lectures, panels, and events on issues of social justice and diversity. And the curriculum includes classes like Critical Race Theory, The Color Line, and Law and Sexual Minorities tackle topics of diversity head-on.

Admissions, scholarships, and financial aid

BU Law is committed to making a legal education accessible for its students. We have the lowest tuition of any private law school ranked in the U.S. News top 30 in 2014, and 90% of our JD students receive financial aid, with 84% receiving an average of $20,750. Every applicant is automatically considered for merit scholarships, and other types of scholarships—including need-based—are available. Learn more about scholarships and financial aid.