Courses

  • GMS GC 700: Genetic Counseling Fieldwork I
    The clinical and non-clinical fieldwork will provide student interaction with a wide array of genetic specialists. Direct patient contact in prenatal, pediatric, adult, cancer, and specialty genetics clinics will allow students to acquire cases for ABGC certification. 2 cr each, Summer, Fall & Spring sem.
  • GMS GC 702: Genetic Counseling Fieldwork II
    The clinical and non-clinical fieldwork will provide student interaction with a wide array of genetic specialists. Direct patient contact in prenatal, pediatric, adult, cancer, and specialty genetics clinics will allow students to acquire cases for ABGC certification. 2 cr each, Summer, Fall & Spring sem.
  • GMS GC 703: Genetic Counseling Fieldwork III
    The clinical and non-clinical fieldwork will provide student interaction with a wide array of genetic specialists. Direct patient contact in prenatal, pediatric, adult, cancer, and specialty genetics clinics will allow students to acquire cases for ABGC certification. 2 cr each, Summer, Fall & Spring sem.
  • GMS GC 704: Genetic Counseling Fieldwork IV
    The clinical and non-clinical fieldwork will provide student interaction with a wide array of genetic specialists. Direct patient contact in prenatal, pediatric, adult, cancer, and specialty genetics clinics will allow students to acquire cases for ABGC certification. 2 cr each, Summer, Fall & Spring sem.
  • GMS GC 711: Advanced Genetic Counseling
    This two-semester course will cover advanced topics in genetic counseling, including research project design and implementation, personal growth, and professional development. It will build upon the students' previous course work and clinical training to enhance their growing skill set as genetic counselors. 4 cr, Fall & Spring sem.
  • GMS GC 714: Advanced Topics in Medical Genetics
    This course will build from the basic genetic concepts covered in GMS GC 605. Some of the topics addressed include autism spectrum disorders, direct to consumer testing, pain management, complex genetic mechanisms, chronic conditions, screening programs, and pharmacogenetics, and emerging genetics specialties. 3 cr, Spring sem.
  • GMS GC 716: Social, Cultural, and Ethical Issues in Genetics
    This course will address the social, cultural, and ethical issues encountered in genetics and genetic counseling. We will review the basic principles of biomedical ethics and discuss different scenarios that a genetic counselor may encounter, as well as legal cases that have impacted the field of genetic counseling and the ethics of emerging genetic technologies and practices including direct-to-consumer testing and gene therapy. Social and cultural issues in genetic counseling will be explored through case studies, addressing gender, race, religion, social class, disability, and sexual orientation. 3 cr, Spring sem.
  • GMS GE 703: Genetics and Genomics Colloquium I
    Graduate Prerequisites: consent of instructor
    The Genetics and Genomics Colloquium will be a highly participatory journal club where the students will be asked to give presentations on cutting edge research with the focus on communication skills rather than scientific content. This approach will allow students to become more comfortable with public speaking while developing the skills necessary for effective communication of scientific ideas. 2 cr, Fall sem.
  • GMS GE 704: Genetics and Genomics Colloquium II
    Graduate Prerequisites: consent of instructor
    The Genetics and Genomics Colloquium will be a highly participatory journal club where the students will be asked to give presentations on cutting edge research with the focus on communication skills rather than scientific content. This approach will allow students to become more comfortable with public speaking while developing the skills necessary for effective communication of scientific ideas. 2 cr, Spring sem.
  • GMS GE 901: Research in Genetics and Genomics
    Var cr, Fall & Spring sem.
  • GMS IM 600: Bioimaging Foundations
    Graduate Prerequisites: consent of instructor
    The physical, mathematical, and experimental foundations of bioimaging are studied with historical context and are presented in the following sequence: bioimaging, principles, bioimaging mathematics, and bioimaging physics, leading to the study of the different bioimage generation techniques (modalities). 4 cr
  • GMS IM 610: Magnetic Resonance: Principles, Methods, and Applications in Biomedical Research
    Graduate Prerequisites: consent of instructor
    This course will provide an overview of the underlying principles of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and the various methodologies used in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) with emphasis on methods applied in biomedical research. The course will emphasize the connection between the basic manipulation of the spin system via the sequence of RF and gradient pulses (the pulse sequence) and the information that can be retrieved from the observed object, be it a solution of an isolated protein of the human brain. 4 cr
  • GMS IM 620: Bioimaging Theory & Imaging Processing
    Graduate Prerequisites: consent of instructor
    The main theoretical aspects of bioimaging are studied, including image meaning, image generation, image quality (analysis, improvement, and limits), image information content (generation and extraction), and image assisted modeling of biologic systems. Mathematical foundations and basic techniques for digital image processing are studied theoretically as well as in a hands-on approach in the Image Processing Laboratory. 4 cr
  • GMS IM 630: Methods of Functional Imaging of the Brain
    Graduate Prerequisites: consent of instructor
    This course will provide an overview of the various existing methods for detecting and mapping brain function in vivo. A brief introduction will provide the necessary background to brain physiology: electrical activity, synaptic transmission, cell metabolism and haemodynamic response associated with neuronal activity. 2 cr
  • GMS IM 650: Bioimaging Practicum
    Graduate Prerequisites: consent of instructor
    This is the capstone course for the clinical path. Utilizing the base of the knowledge gained throughout the previous year, and applying learned methods in bioimaging, this practicum provides the student an opportunity to perform a guided research activity focused on practical applications in bioimaging. The specific objective of this capstone requirement is to prepare the students to be able to directly contribute to the process of bioimaging and to equip the student with practical experience in evaluating and planning practical activities in the field. 4 cr
  • GMS IM 651: Statistical Analysis of Neuroimaging Data
    Graduate Prerequisites: consent of instructor
    This course is designed to give the student a working knowledge of the parametric and non-parametric statistical procedures that are commonly used to analyze data generated from in vivo imaging techniques such as CT, MRI, PET and SPECT. 2 cr
  • GMS IM 655: Directed Studies in Bioimaging
    Var cr
  • GMS IM 660: Radiation Protection & Ethics
    Graduate Prerequisites: consent of instructor
    Many of the established and state-of-the-art modalities in diagnostic imaging rely upon radiation as the imaging agent. However, radiation in itself is considered a hazard that must be controlled. This course will introduce the fundamentals of understanding radiation, the risks of radiation exposure, and the methods of minimizing its harmful potential while maximizing its beneficial qualities. 2 cr
  • GMS IM 670: Special Topics in Bioimaging
    Graduate Prerequisites: consent of instructor
    Imaging has come to increasingly serve as a substrate and necessary ingredient for progressively more complex diagnoses and therapy. The increasing significance of the imaging components has been classically appreciated in fields such as radiation therapy, where planning of treatment based on images is integral to the therapy itself, and has spread beyond the boundaries of such disciplines to numerous surgical fields such as neurosurgery, orthopedics, and ear, nose, and throat surgery. This course provides focused work in such areas as PET/CT and ultrasound/EEG/MEG. 2 cr, on demand.
  • GMS IM 680: Professional Development
    Graduate Prerequisites: consent of instructor
    This course provides instruction in application softwares for imaging processing and mathematical analysis. In addition, this is a preparatory course for students making the transition from a formal academic program into the dynamic work place. It will cover those fundamental skills required to facilitate searching, locating and qualifying for the job of one's choice. It will cover topics such as building a portfolio, networking, resume writing, and interviewing skills. Speakers in the various fields of imaging will be invited to discuss how he or she make the transition into the workplace and students will have the opportunity to discuss and discover the various pitfalls on the paths of entry into the field of his or her choice. 2 cr