• Megan Woolhouse

    Staff Writer

    Megan Woolhouse

    Megan Woolhouse worked as a reporter at the Boston Globe for more than a decade, in addition to newspapers in Louisville, Ky., and Baton Rouge, La. A graduate of Columbia University’s Graduate School of Journalism and Clark University in Worcester, she lives in Boston and enjoys baking, reading, and taekwondo sparring with her seven-year-old daughter. Profile

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There are 4 comments on BU Suspends Study Abroad Program for Fall Semester Because of COVID-19 Pandemic

    1. Why? Restrictions are easing up all over the world. It only takes ONE INCIDENT of exposure to get sick. So why would they be safer overseas as opposed to the US? Had you said this in March, I would completely agree. But there are always people who will defy the law and basic public health guidelines wherever you go. The treatment for COVID is staying at home and resting unless you have breathing issues in which case there is a ventilator needed. So unless there is a ventilator shortage or the US doesn’t have good doctors. I would believe there is no place in the world that a student will be safe since countries are opening back up. I do not disagree with the idea of not having study abroad this semester, but I do disagree with the notion as of today that it is safer to be in another country. The risk of exposure is high regardless of where you are

  1. BU Study Abroad program is a big selling point when students select BU over other schools. With is program suspended, the value of a BU education has decreased substantially. However, tuition for this coming year is 3.9% higher than last year when BU offered a Study Abroad Program.

    How does the tuition increase make sense when BU is providing fewer and fewer educational opportunities for its students?

    Additionally, students that were accepted into the Study Abroad Program, must now scramble for courses and housing for next semester. This is likely to result in students incurring more costs and spend more time salvaging their semester (possibly impacting degree completion timelines).

    Even attempting to communicate that the LfA approach compares in any measure to the experience of living, learning, and working overseas is transparently disingenuine. The LfA messaging is hollow and borderline insulting. At the very least LfA is not worth a 3.9% tuition increase.

    If students are getting less, they should pay less.

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