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There are 5 comments on Asperger’s Are Us

  1. I have worked with children on the spectrum in mainstreamed and self contained classrooms for the past 10 years. That spectrum is very wide and has intricate levels that may never be understood.   What I learned is that children diagnosed on the spectrum are under a magnifying glass in the early grade school years.  As diagnosed children approach adulthood, I noticed that previous obvious peccadillos, for lack of a better word, almost dissipate, although not entirely.  And then it dawned on me….there have been many doctors, surgeons, lawyers, judges, principals, professors, etc. which I had encountered in my life who obviously had never been diagnosed.   
    As it is, it’s unfortunate that our youth treats grade school, middle school and high school peers with such judgement and cruelty with typical students.  If you stand out in any way imaginable, you don’t stand a chance.  Our society masters in discrimination.  Until our culture can accept and embrace all individuals as human beings first and foremost and look past differences of race, color, creed, neurological, genetic, or social differences, the acceptance and ease of these difficult years will only exasperate with any one who acts or looks different.  Aspergers has an edge on the spectrum.  There is an intriguing uniqueness within this area that should be respected and marveled.  Can we try explaining that to grade, middle and high 
    school bullies?

  2. So interesting! But could Asperger’s Are Us perform at BU or somewhere in Boston? I really want to see you guys! I could get the psych seminar room for your stage, perhaps at 5pm? or ask the BU pub? Let’s fine a way….

    1. Hey Catherine,
      We’d love to do a show at BU. We’d need to get paid enough to make it worth our while, but are very interested. Please get in touch with us via our Facebook or email me. Thanks! -Noah

  3. My handsome, artistic, fully-masculine husband, now age 71, is Asperger’s. Took me a number of years to figure out what was going on with him. He does not like to maintain eye contact, dislikes being touched (except erotically), has difficulty expressing himself verbally, is ritualistic, quickly acts out in anger, does not read social cues. This has made it difficult for me to live with him, but the upside is he is predictable, dependable, a gifted architect and diligent vegetable gardener. I consider his temperament simply a version of normal on a behavioral spectrum, just as folks who are especially gregarious and highly verbal are towards the other end of the spectrum. Different strokes for different folks, and all God’s chillun got a place in the choir, some sing lower, some sing higher. I disapprove of drugging Asperger’s folks, especially children. Let them be who they are designed to be.

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