Cinema & Media Studies

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  • CAS CI 101: History of Global Cinema 1: Origins through 1950s
    This course provides an overview of film history in a number of different national traditions, from the origins of film to the 1950s. It covers the emergence of the key international film movements, alongside the economic and historical conditions that inform them. Carries humanities divisional credit in CAS. This course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Aesthetic Exploration, Historical Consciousness, Critical Thinking.
    • Aesthetic Exploration
    • Historical Consciousness
    • Critical Thinking
  • CAS CI 102: History of Global Cinema 2: 1960s to the Present
    This course provides an overview of film history in a number of different national traditions, from the 1960s to the present. It covers the emergence of the key international film movements, alongside the economic and historical conditions that inform them. Carries humanities divisional credit in CAS. This course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Aesthetic Exploration, Historical Consciousness, Critical Thinking.
    • Aesthetic Exploration
    • Historical Consciousness
    • Critical Thinking
  • CAS CI 201: Literature and the Art of Film
    Provides an overview of fundamental concepts for the analysis and understanding of film. Films are screened weekly and in conjunction with works of literature. Students must register for screening, discussion, and lecture. Also offered as CAS EN 175 and COM CI 201. 4 cr. either sem. This course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Aesthetic Exploration, Digital/Multimedia Expression.
    • Aesthetic Exploration
    • Digital/Multimedia Expression
  • CAS CI 202: Understanding Film
    Introduces students to the scholarly study of film aesthetics. Students learn to analyze film elements closely, from composition and editing to sound, across a variety of styles and genres of narrative, nonfiction and experimental film.
  • CAS CI 269: Representations of the Holocaust in Literature and Film
    Questions of representation in literature and film about the Holocaust, including testimonial and fictive works by Wiesel and Levi, Ozick, and others; films include documentaries and feature films. Discussions of the Holocaust as historical reality, metaphor, and generative force in literature. Also offered as CAS RN 385 A1 and CAS XL 281 A1.
  • CAS CI 303: Understanding TV
    History of television (and its foundation in radio) as it emerged, stabilized, interacted with other media, was regulated/deregulated, was shaped by and shaped the culture. Focuses on broadcasting's beginnings, expansion, establishment as the national, mass medium in America, and eventual fracturing into niches.
  • CAS CI 351: Topics in Auteur Studies
    May be repeated for credit if topic is different. Topic for Spring 2019: TBA.
  • CAS CI 369: Greek Tragedy and Film
    Explores Greek tragic myth's afterlife, both directly and obliquely, in cinema and in the modern literature spawning cinema: how certain Greek tragic myths have come to life as film and how "non-mythic" stories have acquired a mythic power in literary and cinematic form. Also offered as CAS CL 325.
    • Philosophical Inquiry and Life's Meanings
    • Historical Consciousness
    • Critical Thinking
  • CAS CI 373: Women and Film
    Study of principally American films, exploring how the medium has shaped and been shaped by cultural perceptions of women. Readings provide background for interpretation of films ranging from screwball comedy to film noir, "women's films," and films by women directors. Also offered as CAS WS 346.
  • CAS CI 387: The Holocaust Through Film
    Undergraduate Prerequisites: First Year Writing Seminar (e.g., WR 100 or WR 120).
    An examination of film using the Holocaust as its central topic. What are the political and cultural effects when genocide is represented through film? Can feature films portray history, and if so, what are the consequences for an informed society? This course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Historical Consciousness, Global Citizenship and Intercultural Literacy, Writing-intensive Course.
    • Historical Consciousness
    • Global Citizenship and Intercultural Literacy
    • Writing-Intensive Course
  • CAS CI 390: Special Topics in Cinema and Media Studies
    May be repeated for credit if topic is different. Topic for Spring 2019: Gender and Globalization through Film in the Middle East. Exploration of the intersection of gender, sexuality, and globalization in Middle Eastern films. Analysis and interrogation of films' contributions to the construction of gender and sexual norms in the late 20th and early 21st centuries.
  • CAS CI 394: Topics in Film and Literature
    Major themes and techniques of filmmakers and writers are explored. May be repeated for credit if topic is different. Two topics are offered Spring 2019. Section A1: Film Noir. Intensive study of film noir in both its classic and revisionist periods, informed by readings in hard-boiled detective fiction. Topics include: gender divisions, fatal plotting, the death drive, sex and cigarettes. Weekly screenings. Section B1: Melodrama in Japanese Cinema and Literature. Uses Japan as case study to examine melodrama in world film/literature. Considers how genre helps us to better understand a work of art, how cultural differences challenge that understanding, and how melodramatic works explore gender, cultural identity, morality, and sexuality.
  • CAS CI 510: Critical Studies in Literature and the Arts
    Topic for Spring 2019: Film Theory. Survey of the writing and thinking of influential theorists and critics. Includes screenings of films relevant to the theoretical discussions, and questions how films offer their own ideas about the nature of film.
  • CAS CI 530: Topics in TV Genre Studies
    Undergraduate Prerequisites: CAS CI 303.
    Two topics are offered for Fall 2018. Students may take one or both for credit. Section A1: TV Genres and Fandom. TV programs have huge fan bases, whether cult audiences, fanboys and fangirls, or X-Philes and Trekkies. Scholarship on reception theory and fan studies is used to explore multiple television genres and their connections to enduring varieties of fandom. Section B1: Broadcasting Horror. Examines the censorship of horror; horror's relation to sound; the aesthetics of TV horror; horror and genre mixing; the serialization of horror; broadcast vs. cable horror; and the violence of horror. Two topics are offered for Spring 2019. Students may take one or both for credit. Section A1: Comic Book TV: Section B1: TV Comedy.
  • CAS CI 533: Topics in Film Movements
    May be repeated for credit if topic is different. Topic for Spring 2019: TBA.
  • CAS CI 551: Topics in Auteur Studies
    Topic for Fall 2018: Renoir and Bunuel. Surveys the careers of two of cinema's greatest and most admired directors: Jean Renoir and Luis Bunuel. Both directors had long careers, stretching from the late silent era into the 1970s, working in France, Spain, the U.S., Mexico, and India
  • CAS CI 562: French Cinema and Literature
    Undergraduate Prerequisites: CAS LF 350.
    Analysis of classic French films by Vigo, Renoir, Carne, Malle, Bresson, Godard, and Truffaut as well as later twentieth and early twenty-first century works. Weekly screenings, reading of literary models and film theory. Also offered as CAS LF 556.
  • CAS CI 583: TV Theory and Criticism
    Undergraduate Prerequisites: CAS CI 303.
    This discussion-driven seminar sets aside evaluative considerations of TV in favor of theoretical and critical approaches that challenge widespread assumptions about the medium and expand our understanding of its role in our lives.
  • CAS CI 588: Writing Film and TV Criticism
    Examines the art of film and television criticism and gives students extensive practice in writing about film and TV in a way that balances informed, insightful analysis and lively writing. Key critics discussed include James Agee, Andrew Sarris, Pauline Kael, Roger Ebert, Emily Nussbaum, Matt Zoller Seitz, Anthony Lane, Manohla Dargis and A.O. Scott.
  • CAS CI 590: Special Topics in Cinema and Media Studies
    Seven topics are offered for Fall 2018. Make be repeated for credit if section topic is different. Section A1: Shakespeare and Film. Study of Shakespeare's tragedies, including Hamlet, Othello, King Lear, and Macbeth, in multiple film versions of each play by such directors as Olivier, Welles, Nunn, Eyre, Branagh, Luhrmann, Taymor, and Kurosawa. Previous study of Shakespeare recommended. Also offered as CAS EN 568. Section B1: American Masterworks. Survey of American cinema from the beginnings to 1960s, with focus on major Hollywood genres from the 1920s through the 1950s (some alternatives included). Topics include censorship, coming of sound, World War II, widescreen film, drive-ins, early special effects, important stars and directors. Section C1: Writing Film and TV Criticism. This course provides students opportunities to write smart, lively reviews and think about pieces of current films and TV/streaming shows across many genres. We also study legendary critics (Agee, Sarris, Kael, Ebert) as well as current critics. Section D1: Queer Cinema. Contemporary American and global queer cinema's shifting representations of queerness in their cultural, subcultural, national, and transnational contexts. Assessing recent phenomena (pink washing, homonationalism, and imperial feminism). Emphasis on narrative films, some avant-garde and documentaries included. Section E1: American Independent Film 3--An Experiential Approach. Contemporary American independent filmmaking between 2000 and the present. Note that CAS CI 590 E1 and COM CI 590 E1 are reserved for CIMS students. All other students should enroll in COM FT 554 C1. Section F1: Bollywood, Nollywood, and Beyond. How Indian, West African, and North African filmmakers have responded to their countries' colonial histories. Examining a range of films, including musicals, dramas, and action films, this course attends to politics, aesthetics, and cultural and industrial history. Section G1: Japanese Cinema. An introduction to the major movements, genres, and directors of Japanese cinema. Using the social, political, and religious history of the region as a guide to examine the Japanese film industry and its cultural products.