Frank Guenther, PhD, MS

Frank Guenther, PhD, MS

Professor, Department of Speech, Language & Hearing Sciences
Professor, Department of Biomedical Engineering
Director, Boston University Speech Lab
Director, Boston University Neural Prosthesis Lab
PhD, Cognitive and Neural Systems, Boston University, Boston, MA, 1993
MS, Electrical Engineering, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ, 1987
BS, Electrical Engineering, University of Missouri-Columbia, 1986
Website or Lab
Neural Prosthesis Lab
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Frank Guenther is professor of speech language, & hearing sciences and biomedical engineering at Boston University. His research combines theoretical modeling with behavioral and neuroimaging experiments to characterize the neural computations underlying speech. He is the originator of the DIVA model, which provides a quantitative account of the neural computations underlying speech motor control and their breakdown in communication disorders such as stuttering and apraxia of speech. He also develops brain-machine interfaces to restore speech communication to individuals suffering from locked-in syndrome, characterized by complete paralysis with intact cognition.

Health Matters Virtual Conference

Dr. Guenther presents How Technology is Changing Rehabilitation. Hosted by Boston University College of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences: Sargent College, this presentation was a part of an online, virtual conference, “Health Matters,” which took place on September 17, 2015.

Research Interests

  • Speech neuroscience
  • Neuroimaging
  • Neural prosthesis

Selected Presentations

  • “The neural mechanisms of speech production: From computational modeling to speech prosthesis.” Keynote Lecture, IEEE Workshop on Automatic Speech Recognition and Understanding,”, Waikoloa Village, Hawaii, December 15, 2011.
  • “The neural mechanisms of speech: From computational modeling to neural prosthesis.” Cushing Neurosurgical Society, Harvard Medical School, November 16, 2010.
  • “The neural mechanisms of speech: From computational modeling to neural prosthesis.” Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, September 9, 2010.
  • “Investigating the neural bases of normal and disordered speech.” Center for Language and Speech Processing, The Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland, April 7, 2009.
  • “Development of a speech prosthesis in a locked-in individual.” Plenary talk, American Society for Artificial Internal Organs, Dallas, Texas, May 28, 2009.
  • “Neural mechanisms of speech.” Keynote Speech, Foundation Ugo Bordoni, Rome, Italy, September 22, 2009.
  • “The neural control of speech.” Max Planck Institute for Dynamics and Self-Organization, Goettingen, Germany, June 27, 2008.
  • “The neural control of speech.” Willard R. Zemlin Lecture in Speech Science, Annual Convention of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association, November 16, 2007.
  • “Auditory, somatosensory, and motor interactions in speech production.” M.D. Steer Distinguished Lecture, Department of Speech, Language, and Hearing Sciences, Purdue University, February 23, 2006.
  • “Auditory, somatosensory, and motor interactions in speech production.” Distinguished Lecture in Speech and Hearing Bioscience and Technology, Harvard-MIT Division of Health Sciences and Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts, December 9, 2004

Selected Publications

  • Guenther, F.H. and Vladusich, T. (2012). A neural theory of speech acquisition and production. Journal of Neurolinguistics. 25, pp. 408-422.
  • Cai, S., Ghosh, S.S., Guenther, F.H., and Perkell, J.S. (2011). Focal manipulations of formant trajectories reveal a role of auditory feedback in the online control of both within-syllable and between-syllable speech timing. Journal of Neuroscience, 31, pp. 16483-90.
  • Patel, R., Niziolek, C., Reilly, K.J., and Guenther, F.H. (2011). Prosodic adaptations to pitch perturbation in running speech. Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, 54, pp. 1051-1059.
  • Brumberg, J.S., Wright, E.J., Andreasen, D.S., Guenther, F.H., and Kennedy, P.R. (2011). Classification of intended phoneme production from chronic intracortical microelectrode recordings in speech motor cortex. Frontiers in Neuroscience, 5, Article 65.
  • Golfinopoulos, E., Tourville, J.A., Bohland, J.W., Ghosh, S.S., Nieto-Castanon, A., and Guenther, F.H. (2011). fMRI investigation of unexpected somatosensory feedback perturbation during speech. NeuroImage, 55, 1324-1338.
  • Civier, O., Tasko, S.M., and Guenther, F.H. (2010). Overreliance on auditory feedback may lead to sound/syllable repetitions: Simulations of stuttering and fluency-inducing conditions with a neural model of speech production. Journal of Fluency Disorders, 35, pp. 246-279.
  • Bohland, J.W., Bullock, D., and Guenther, F.H. (2010). Neural representations and mechanisms for the performance of simple speech sequences. Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience, 22, pp. 1504-1529.
  • Guenther, F.H., Brumberg, J.S., Wright, E.J., Nieto-Castanon, A., Tourville, J.A., Panko, M., Law, R., Siebert, S.A., Bartels, J.L., Andreasen, D.S., Ehirim, P., Mao, H., and Kennedy, P.R. (2009). A wireless brain-machine interface for real-time speech synthesis. PLoS ONE, 4(12), pp. e8218+.
  • Tourville, J.A., Reilly, K.J., and Guenther, F.H. (2008). Neural mechanisms underlying auditory feedback control of speech. NeuroImage, 39, pp. 1429-1443.
  • Loui, P., Guenther, F.H., Mathys, C., and Schlaug, G. (2008). Action-perception mismatch in tone-deafness. Current Biology, 18, pp. R331-R332.
  • Guenther, F.H., Ghosh, S.S., and Tourville, J.A. (2006). Neural modeling and imaging of the cortical interactions underlying syllable production. Brain and Language, 96, pp. 280-301.
  • Bohland, J.W. and Guenther, F.H. (2006). An fMRI investigation of syllable sequence production. NeuroImage, 32, pp. 821-841.
  • Guenther, F.H., Hampson, M., and Johnson, D. (1998). A theoretical investigation of reference frames for the planning of speech movements. Psychological Review, 105, pp. 611-633.
  • Guenther, F.H. (1995). Speech sound acquisition, coarticulation, and rate effects in a neural network model of speech production. Psychological Review, 102, pp. 594-621.

Professional Activities

  • Faculty Member, Harvard/MIT Speech and Hearing Bioscience and Technology (1998 – Present)
  • Research Affiliate, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (1997 – Present)
  • Visiting Scientist, Massachusetts General Hospital (2003 – Present)•

Grant Activity

  • NIH P50 HD073912, Project II Principal Investigator (7/1/2013 – 6/30/2018)
  • NIH R01 DC007683, Principal Investigator (5/1/2011-4/30/2016)
  • NIH R01 DC002852, Principal Investigator (8/1/2011-7/31/2016)
  • NSF SMA-0835976, Co-Principal Investigator (10/1/2004– 02/28/2015)

Awards and Honors

  • 2011 – Top 10 Finalist, G.Tec Annual International Brain-Computer Interface Research Award
  • 2009 – Distinguished Speaker in Cognitive Science, Michigan State University
  • 2008 – Elected Fellow of the Acoustical Society of America
  • 2007 Editor’s Award for top article in speech, Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research
  • 2007 Editor’s Award for top article in hearing, Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research
  • 2007 Willard R. Zemlin Lecture Award, American Speech-Language-Hearing Association
  • 2006 M.D. Steer Distinguished Lecturer, Purdue University
  • 2004 Distinguished Lecturer in Speech and Hearing Bioscience and Technology, Harvard/MIT
  • 1995-1997 – Alfred P. Sloan Research Fellowship