Category: 2011

William R. Jobin Delivers Pardee Center Distinguished Lecture on Disease Control

January 26th, 2012 in 2011

On Thursday, December 15, 2011, Dr. William R. Jobin delivered the annual Pardee Distinguished Lecture sponsored by the Frederick S. Pardee Center for the Study of the Longer-Range Future at the Boston University.  Students and faculty from BU and elsewhere filled the room for the lecture, which was held at BU’s Hillel House.

Dr. Jobin is an engineer and an expert in the prevention and control of malaria and other diseases. He has more than 40 years of experience in field work related to malaria control in Africa and other parts of the world.  Early in his career, he worked for health and development agencies, such as the Centers for Disease Control and the World Health Organization, before founding the consulting firm, Blue Nile Associates, in 1984.  In his work at Blue Nile, he specializes in environmental assessment and improvement of existing and proposed development projects in the Tropics, based on requirements for protecting human health, water quality, and agricultural land uses.

In his lecture, titled, “WHO Controls the Future of Disease: Agroecology, Hydropower, and Malaria,” Dr. Jobin cited dwindling global funds for malaria and disease prevention, and was critical of what he called “unsustainable”  and “emphemeral” efforts to address malaria by distributing drugs, bednets, and biocides – all of which need to be supplied on an annual basis at significant costs.  He advocated that global development and health organizations should be focused on “permanent” solutions such as understanding which crops and agricultural practices attract mosquitoes and then help to change crop plantings and practices accordingly.  He also suggested that all homes and other buildings should be required to have window and door screens, and that drainage methods should be used to keep water away from houses and other structures.

He also said there are there are technical improvements that could be made to the design and operation of dams to avoid attracting mosquitoes and those methods should be mandated in the design and operation of new structures. This approach is critical to capitalizing on the limited available funds, he argued.

The lecture concluded with a lively discussion with audience members on the possibilities of sustainable malaria control.

Alejandro Avenburg Selected to Present at the 2012 Midwest Political Science Association Conference

December 19th, 2011 in 2011, News, Uncategorized

AlejandroAlejandro Avenburg, a 2011 Graduate Summer Fellow at the Frederick S. Pardee Center for the Study of the Longer-Range Future, has been selected to present his paper, “Corruption, Accountability, and Citizen Participation in Protests in Latin America,” at the 2012 Midwest Political Science Association Conference in Chicago next April. Avenburg’s paper is based on research he did when he was a Summer Fellow at the Pardee Center.

In his paper, Avenburg uses survey data to analyze the relationship between citizen perceptions and experiences with corruption and their likelihood of participating in protests. He argues that when citizens perceive or experience high levels of corruption in government, they are more likely to join in public protests.

To read about the Pardee Center Summer Fellows program click here.

William R. Jobin Delivers Pardee Center Distinguished Lecture on Disease Control

December 16th, 2011 in 2011, News, Uncategorized

IMG_9979

On Thursday, December 15, 2011, Dr. William R. Jobin delivered the annual Pardee Distinguished Lecture sponsored by the Frederick S. Pardee Center for the Study of the Longer-Range Future at the Boston University.  Students and faculty from BU and elsewhere filled the room for the lecture, which was held at BU’s Hillel House.

Dr. Jobin is an engineer and an expert in the prevention and control of malaria and other diseases. He has more than 40 years of experience in field work related to malaria control in Africa and other parts of the world.  Early in his career, he worked for health and development agencies, such as the Centers for Disease Control and the World Health Organization, before founding the consulting firm, Blue Nile Associates, in 1984.  In his work at Blue Nile, he specializes in environmental assessment and improvement of existing and proposed development projects in the Tropics, based on requirements for protecting human health, water quality, and agricultural land uses.

In his lecture, titled, “WHO Controls the Future of Disease: Agroecology, Hydropower, and Malaria,” Dr. Jobin cited dwindling global funds for malaria and disease prevention, and was critical of what he called “unsustainable”  and “emphemeral” efforts to address malaria by distributing drugs, bednets, and biocides – all of which need to be supplied on an annual basis at significant costs.  He advocated that global development and health organizations should be focused on “permanent” solutions such as understanding which crops and agricultural practices attract mosquitoes and then help to change crop plantings and practices accordingly.  He also suggested that all homes and other buildings should be required to have window and door screens, and that drainage methods should be used to keep water away from houses and other structures.

He also said there are there are technical improvements that could be made to the design and operation of dams to avoid attracting mosquitos and those methods should be mandated in the design and operation of new structures. This approach is critical to capitalizing on the limited available funds, he argued.

The lecture concluded with a lively discussion with audience members on the possibilities of sustainable malaria control.

Video of the full lecture will be available soon on the multimedia page of this website

Dr. Munoz Delivers Keynote at Nordic IEG Event

December 14th, 2011 in 2011, News

Rio20Logo2Dr. Miquel Munoz, post-doctoral fellow at the Frederick S. Pardee Center For the Study of the Longer-Range Future, was invited as a keynote speaker to discuss system-wide strategies and frameworks at an event on International Environmental Governance organized by the Nordic Council of Ministers.

The event, held at the International Peace Institute in New York, in the context of ongoing Rio+20 negotiations, was attended by over sixty representatives from countries and UN agencies and addressed questions such as how to enhance coordination and coherence in the UN system, how to bridge the normative and operational aspects of environmental governance, and how to promote close cooperation and synergies among the multilateral environmental agreements.

In his presentation, Dr. Munoz outlined the key elements of a proposed Global Registry of Commitments on Sustainable Development, defining it as a doable instrument that can be agreed upon at Rio+20 and will help eradicate the culture of unaccountability that pervades the system of global governance for sustainable development.

James McCann Interviewed on Chicago Public Radio on African Culinary History

December 14th, 2011 in 2011, News

Prof. James McCann

Prof. James McCann

James McCann, Professor of History and Director, ad interim at the Frederick S. Pardee Center, was interviewed about Africa’s rich food history by Jerome McDonnell for Worldview on WBEZ, the public radio station in Chicago. The interview is part of the occasional Food Mondays series. McCann is the author of Stirring the Pot: A History of African Cuisine, and is an expert in African culinary and environmental history.

stirring-pot-history-african-cuisine-james-c-mccann-paperback-cover-art“Food is the daily practice that we take for granted,” says McCann in the interview.

In the age of the “foodie,” the interview centers on Africa’s overlooked cuisines and food history. McCann reviews the influence of African cooking abroad, and outside influences to the continent. The interview covers variations in region by staple starch, and customs.

“The notion of street food, is historically in some places, in Africa not everywhere. Ghana historically had street food. In Ethiopia, it’s changed just a little bit now, but historically, you do not eat in front of other people in a public place, you don’t walk with something that you are munching on down the street.”

To listen to the complete interview click here.

Dr. Suranjana Nabar-Bhaduri Joins Pardee Center as a Post-Doc Fellow

December 8th, 2011 in 2011, News

Nabar-Bhaduri_thumbnailDr. Suranjana Nabar-Bhaduri, a scholar of development economics and the Indian economy, recently joined the Pardee Center as a Post-Doctoral Fellow.

She is currently working on a policy brief for Pardee Center on the effects of liberalizing economies to external markets while minimizing state intervention in the developing world.

Her research interests include the development of policies conducive to sustainable and inclusive development; the relationship between foreign direct investment (FDI) and economic development; the development of alternative measures of economic growth and development; factors driving the reduction of the balance of payments constraint in developing countries; human rights in developing countries; gender and environmental aspects of development; and the political economy of international relations.

Dr. Nabar-Bhaduri earned a doctorate in economics from the the University of Utah. Her dissertation, A Structuralist Approach to Analyzing India’s Productivity, Employment and Export Performance, emphasizes the need to account for sectoral-level dynamics when evaluating the efficacy of structural policy shifts in a developing country. She completed her M.A. in economics at the University of Mumbai, India. She completed her B.A. in economics and statistics at the University of Mumbai as well.

Click here for more information on Dr. Nabar-Bhaduri’s research and publications.

Pablo Suarez Featured in Reuters Article on Climate Games

December 5th, 2011 in 2011, News

pablo-suarezPablo Suarez, a visiting post-doc fellow at the Frederick S. Pardee Center, is receiving media attention for his innovative approach to climate change impacts.

Reporters from Reuters caught up with Suarez at a global climate summit in Durban, South Africa. Suarez, related his inspiration for his latest initiative for educating communities. After finding PowerPoint presentations to be somewhat soporific for the audience, he was pushed to try something else.

“I had to convey the idea of a storm, of an extreme weather event, and I had a Frisbee and I just threw it into the audience,” Suarez, a Red Cross associate director of programs, told Reuters.

“And the audience woke up, they saw that there was danger.”

Suarez has since developed games to educate communities, farmers, policy makers, and humanitarian workers on the probabilities of extreme weather events.

To read the whole article click here.

Suarez will lead a gaming session associated Pardee Center Task Force meeting at Boston University in March. Further details will be available at bu.edu/pardee soon.

Pardee Center to Co-Organize Side Event at UN Rio+20 Intersessional

December 2nd, 2011 in 2011, News

Rio20Logo2The Pardee Center at Boston University will co-organize a side event titled “Achieving Implementation – Accountability, Engagement, and Multi-Stakeholder Cooperation” to be held at the United Nations in New York on December 16, 2011, at the Second Intersessional Meeting  for the forthcoming 2012 Rio+20 conference (the United Nations Conference on Sustainable Development). The event is co-organized by Natural Resources Defense Council, New York University, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Vitae Civilis, and Adelphi Research and will be held on Friday, 16 December 2011; 1.15-2.45pm in Conference Room 1 (NLB) at the United Nations in New York.

The institutional framework for sustainable development (IFSD) and Green Economy in the context of sustainable development and poverty eradication (GESDPE) are the two themes of the Rio+20 Conference. Yet, with less than seven months to go until the Rio+20, there is a dearth of specific and implementable ideas under the IFSD agenda, while GESDPE has been met with a number of reservations in terms of how to accelerate its implementation in industrialized, developing and emerging economies.  Greater public awareness and participation will be required to enable the shift to a green economy. It is ever more apparent that if we want to achieve sustainable development, we need implementation and broader engagement.PardeePosterUNevent

In this context, the Side Event hopes  to positively contribute to the Rio+20 process by presenting different ways to address the implementation problem. The event will bring together (1) a mock-up of how a global registry of commitments on sustainable development could look, (2) fresh ideas about how to move toward a Green Economy from the Climate CoLab’s 2011 online Green Economy Contest (3) different formats of multi-stakeholder cooperation towards a Green Economy.

The Side Event will feature:

1) Stephan Contius, Head of Division for United Nations and Cooperation with Emerging and Developing Countries, German Federal Ministry for the Environment

2)  Miquel Muñoz, Pardee Center

3) Jacob Scherr, Natural Resources Defense Council

4) Thomas W Malone, New York University

5) Robert Laubacher, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

6) Aron Belinky, Vitae Civilis

7) Dennis Taenzler, Adelphi Research

The Pardee Center has focused on the governance dimensions of the Rio+20 conference, including through its recent Task Force report on governance for a green economy (also here and here and here), participating actively in UN discussions (here and here), hosting discussions on accountability issues at the Pardee Center (herehere and here), through its previous seminars at the United Nations (here and here), and through its related publications, including a recent paper on accountability in global environmental governance. This brainstorming event will build on these activities, and ideas generated at the seminar will contribute to a future Pardee Center policy brief on the subject.

Kevin Gallagher Publishes Op-Ed in The Guardian on Capital Controls

November 30th, 2011 in 2011, News

kevin-p. Gallagher4Kevin Gallager, Pardee Faculty Fellow and Associate Professor of international relations at Boston University, published an op-ed on developing countries use of  capital controls in The Guardian (November 29, 2011).  In the op-ed, titled “The IMF Must Heed G20 Decisions,” Prof. Gallagher argues: “The IMF should not ignore the G20′s direction on capital flows. Rather than pushing ahead on a globally enforceable code of conduct that could eventually lead to capital account liberalisation across the globe, the IMF should instead work to reduce the stigma attached to capital controls, protect countries’ ability to deploy them, and help nations police investors who evade regulation. G20 finance ministers, central bankers and heads of state have endorsed the use of capital controls by emerging markets, and on their own terms. The IMF should not pick and choose which directions by world leaders it will follow.”

Prof. Gallagher, in collaboration with José Antonio Ocampo and Stephany Griffith-Jones of the Initiative for Policy Dialogue (IPD) at Columbia University, convened a task force on “Managing Capital Flows for Long-Run Development” on behalf of the Pardee Center on September 16, 2011. For more information about the task force, visit here. They also published a Pardee Issues in Brief paper titled Capital Account Regulations for Stability and Development: A New Approach. To download the issue brief, visit here.

William R. Jobin to Deliver Pardee Distinguished Lecture

November 21st, 2011 in 2011, News

PardeePoster121511The Frederick S. Pardee Center for the Study of the Longer-Range Future is pleased to announce that the next Frederick S. Pardee Distinguished Lecture will be delivered on Thursday, December 15 by Dr. William R. Jobin, Founder of Blue Nile Associates.

Date: Thursday, December 15
Location: Florence and Chafetz Hillel House, 213 Bay State Road, Boston University
Time: 4 p.m. – 5.30 p.m.

Reception: 5.30 p.m. to 6.30 p.m.

(Reception will be held at the African Studies Center, 232 Bay State Road, 5th Floor.)

The event is open to the public, but seating is limited. RSVP to pardee@bu.edu by Friday, December 9, 2011. RSVP is required to reserve a seat.

Dr. William R. Jobin is an expert in the prevention and control of malaria and other tropical diseases, especially in association with water and development projects that result in large-scale ecological changes. After working more than 20 years for large international health and development agencies, in 1984 he founded Blue Nile Associates, which specializes in environmental assessment and improvement of existing and proposed development projects in the Tropics, based on requirements for protecting human health, water quality, and agricultural land uses. His recent work includes projects in Sudan, Peru, Angola, China, Uganda, Chad, Cameroon, Senegal, Egypt, Morocco, Pakistan and Thailand.

This lecture is in memory of Dr. Andrew Spielman, Professor of Tropical Public Health, Harvard School of Public Health.