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The mission of Boston University's Center for Emerging Infectious Diseases Policy & Research (CEID, pronounced like "seed") is to improve societal resilience against the threat of emerging and epidemic infectious diseases worldwide through research, capacity strengthening, training, and advocacy.

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  • “It is simple: we must regard our pandemic preparedness and response as basic infrastructure and invest in it heavily and sustainably.”Angela Rasmussen, Virologist, Vaccine and Infectious Disease Organization

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  • “We need to shift our mind-set from responding as a new disease begins to outsmarting them, finding out where the unknown viruses are lurking, reducing high-risk activities like deforestation and the wildlife trade, and designing vaccines and drugs that target pathogens.”Peter Daszak, President, EcoHealth Alliance

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  • “We must prepare for outbreaks by working seamlessly across government sectors and create new, enduring health security partnerships with academia, nonprofits, the private sector, and communities.” Mohammed Lamorde, Head of Global Health Security Programme at the Infectious Diseases Institute, Makerere University

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  • “Unfortunately, it has taken the horrendous global impact of COVID-19 to underscore how critical it is for the world to develop the capacity to respond rapidly and effectively to future pandemics.”Irwin Redlener, Director, Pandemic Resource and Response Initiative

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  • “We must expand global vaccine capacity by building infrastructure and training human capital, especially in low- and middle-income countries...[And] we must recognize how a rising tide of antivaccine and antiscience activities now undermines current progress.”Peter Hotez, Dean, National School of Tropical Medicine, Baylor College of Medicine

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  • “We need a stronger evidence base to support decision-making, we need to strengthen collaborations and information sharing, and we need to more effectively translate early warning into action.”Rebecca Katz, Professor and Director of the Center for Global Health Science and Security at Georgetown University Medical Center

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  • “We must maintain a state of readiness and look at pandemic preparedness as an active and ongoing process—not an afterthought, not a static state, and not as a ‘once-in-a-century’ problem.”Syra Madad, Senior Director of the System-Wide Special Pathogens Program at NYC Health + Hospitals

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  • “We need to invest in basic sciences. The remarkable development and future improvement of vaccines rely on basic research on molecular biology, material science, virology, structural biology, and immunology.”Akiko Iwasaki, Professor of Immunobiology, Howard Hughes Medical Institute

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  • “The pandemic has highlighted the need for coordinated efforts that include early detection through epidemic intelligence, diagnostic test development, strong epidemiology and public health response, along with bench science for vaccine and therapeutic development.”Larry Madoff, Editor of ProMED and Professor of Medicine, University of Massachusetts

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  • “We need to take a hard look at our response over the last year, admit several severe mistakes were made, learn from them, and ensure we won’t repeat them again once the next pandemic comes around.”Kristian Andersen, Principal Investigator, Anderson Lab, The Scripps Research Institute

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  • “The greatest priority should be on building health research capacity in low- and middle-income countries where the health burdens and threats are greater and research capacity is often lower than in higher-income countries.”Peter Kilmarx, Deputy Director, Fogarty International Center at the National Institutes of Health

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  • “For the first time in history, we have the tools to take the pandemic threat off the table. It’s an audacious goal that will take focus, resources, and most importantly a commitment to global equitable access.”Rajeev Venkayya, President, Takeda Global Vaccines. Board Member, Coalition for Epidemic Preparedness Innovations (CEPI)

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