Courses

The course descriptions below are correct to the best of our knowledge as of April 2016. Instructors reserve the right to update and/or otherwise alter course descriptions as necessary after publication. The listing of a course description here does not guarantee a course’s being offered in a particular semester. The Course Rotation Guide lists the expected semester a course will be taught. Please refer to the published schedule of classes for confirmation a class is actually being taught and for specific course meeting dates and times. In addition to the courses listed in the Bulletin and courses approved after April 1, SPH degree candidates may register for a directed (independent) study with a full-time SPH faculty member. For more information, speak with your faculty advisor or a staff member in the SPH Registrar’s office.

  • SPH PH 970: Public Health Practicum
    Graduate Prerequisites: MPH students only. Minimum of 12 credits hours completed. Consent and signature of Practice Office.
    This course allows students the opportunity to integrate and apply classroom learning in a public health work environment through an approved, planned and supervised practicum. For students matriculating in Fall 2009 and after, course components include: 1. placement in an agency or organization with a scope of work which develops and applies learned public health skills. 2. minimum of 112 practicum work hours 3.approved learning contract 4.faculty and agency oversight 5.midpoint review 6.written abstract 7. poster presentation and integration seminar 8.evaluations 9. attendance of 2 skill-based professional development seminars. For students matriculating prior to Fall 2009, see the Practice Office for requirements. Practicum course is graded pass/fail.
  • SPH PH 971: Public Health Practicum
    Graduate Prerequisites: MPH/MSW students only. Minimum of 12 credits hours completed. Consent and signature of Practice Office.
    This course presents an opportunity for students to use his/her second year SSW field placement to fulfill the MPH practicum requirement. Course components include one, 2-hour seminar and an individualized learning experience (choice of seminars or reflective essay, focusing on social work and/or public health practices). Students must also attend two skill-based professional development seminars. Practicum is graded Pass/fail.
  • SPH PH 975: Public Health Practicum
    Graduate Prerequisites: MPH students only. Minimum of 12 credits hours completed. Consent andsignature of Practice Office.
    This course allows students the opportunity to integrate and apply classroom learning in a public health work environment through an approved, planned and supervised practicum. Students may register for 1, 2, 3, or 4 credits. For students matriculating in Fall 2009 and after, course components include: 1. placement in an agency or organization with a scope of work which develops and applies learned public health skills. 2. minimum of 112 practicum work hours 3.approved learning contract 4.faculty and agency oversight 5.midpoint review 6.written abstract 7. poster presentation and integration seminar 8.evaluations 9. attendance of 2 skill-based professional development seminars. For students matriculating prior to Fall 2009 who do a 2 or 4 credit practicum, see the Practice Office for requirements. Students matriculating prior to Fall 2009 who select a 1 or 3 credit practicum in Fall 2009 or thereafter must follow the new requirements. Practicum course is graded pass/fail.
  • SPH PH 976: MPH Health Practicum
    All MPH students must complete a practicum of at least 240 hours by registering for PH 976 or one of the courses listed below. Students who complete a course with a practice-based component will earn 30 hours toward the practicum requirement. Courses with approved practice-based components include GH 743, GH 744, PM 832, PM 835, and SB 806. Others may be added via petition to the Practicum Director. The Career Services office assists students in finding an appropriate practicum site. Students may also find practicums through professional and personal contacts, including SPH faculty. The practicum requirements may include, but may not be limited to the following: Placement approval, registration for SPH PH 976 (0 credit), a learning contract, and a final assessment.
  • SPH PH 978: Public Health Practicum
    The purpose of this course is to provide dual MBA-MPH students a structured and mentored opportunity to explore the public health context and implications of their summer internship experiences. The course addresses at least the following MPH competencies. Use systematic approaches to develop, implement, and evaluate public health policies, programs, or services.Communicate effectively to multiple audiences in written and presentation form.
  • SPH PH 984: Public Health Practicum
    Graduate Prerequisites: MPH students only. Minimum of 12 credits hours completed. Consent of supervising faculty and signature of Practice Office (638-4656).
    This 4-credit directed practicum option and is available for the student who will produce an enhanced academic product suitable for publication or for presentation upon completion of the practicum. In order to choose this option, the student must also identify a BUSPH faculty member with whom to work. Expectations and guidelines for the academic product must be discussed with the faculty preceptor at the onset of the practicum. The student must demonstrate the capacity to complete such a project. The faculty member should commit to such a project only if he/she is willing to co-author with the student on the practicum product. The faculty member must also commit to meeting with the student several times during the course of the practicum semester. For students matriculating in Fall 2009 and after, course components include: 1. placement in an agency or organization with a scope of work which develops and applies learned public health skills. 2. minimum of 112 practicum work hours 3.approved learning contract 4.faculty and agency oversight 5.midpoint review 6.written abstract 7. poster presentation and integration seminar 8.evaluations 9. attendance of 2 skill-based professional development seminars.10. submission of enhanced academic product. For students matriculating prior to Fall 2009, see the Practice Office for requirements. Practicum is graded.
  • SPH PH 986: DrPH Practicum
    Graduate Prerequisites: For DrPH students only
    Required practicum for DrPH students. Students must submit paperwork to Sebastian Bach in the DrPH Program Office for approval prior to registration. Course is pass/fail.
  • SPH PH 990: Continuing Study in DrPH Program
    Graduate Prerequisites: For DrPH students approved for dissertation only.
    Must be DrPH student working on dissertation. Doctoral students who have completed all academic course requirements, must register for Continuing Study Fee every Fall and Spring semester until they have successfully defended their dissertation and graduated from SPH. Students are certified full time and charged for student health insurance, the equivalent of two credits of tuition, and all relevant fees.
  • SPH PH 995: Summer Research for Curricular Practical Training
    Graduate Prerequisites: International MS or Doctoral Student at SPH engaging in off-campus research
    This course provides an appropriate registration status for international MS or doctoral students in any SPH department who need Curricular Practical Training (CPT) authorization in order to conduct off-campus research that is required in their curriculum. CPT authorization is required regardless of whether the research is part of a paid or unpaid position.
  • SPH PM 714: Healthcare Management as a Profession
    This seminar will provide students with an understanding of the scope of current healthcare management practices and challenges, an introduction to case-based analysis, and the professionalism skills necessary to engage with healthcare managers in practice-based projects and other applied educational activities.
  • SPH PM 721: Organizational Behavior in Health Care
    Graduate Prerequisites: PM702 or IH704 or SAR HP353 or PH719 for nonconcentrators
    This course provides a framework for understanding, diagnosing, and taking actions to improve individual, group, and system-wide effectiveness in health services organizations. Concepts from the organizational behavior literature are applied to issues in health services organizations. Some of the topics this course addresses and integrates are leadership, motivation, culture, team dynamics, organization design and coordination, and organizational change. Case studies, brief lectures, student presentations, and experiential exercises are used throughout this course, and working in teams is a large component of the course.
  • SPH PM 733: Health Program Management
    Graduate Prerequisites: SPH PH 719 and SPH PH 720; or consent of instructor.
    This course associates the role of a leader and manager in provider and payer health care settings with real-world business knowledge and skills. It aims to better equip present and future health care managers in order to lead, plan effectively, anticipate challenges and marshal resources. Students will gain an appreciation for the complexities of management and leadership in challenging health care situations. Concepts will be discussed briefly with the greater emphasis on the development of the critical thinking skills necessary to succeed in today's changing health care environment. This course will make significant use of case study and requires class participation. Topics include differentiating leadership from management, patient and process flow, the importance of organizational culture, and managing change. In addition, one session is devoted entirely as a workshop on provider-payer health care negotiations.
  • SPH PM 734: Principles and Practices in Non-Profit Health Care Accounting
    This course combines didactic and case study approaches to the fundamentals of nonprofit accounting, with emphasis on health care institutions. Topics covered include accrual accounting, fund accounting, budgeting, and cost concepts. Analysis and interpretation of financial statements for decision making by the nonfinancial manager are stressed.
  • SPH PM 735: Health Care Finance: How Policy-makers and Managers Can Use Money as a Tool to Improve Health Care
    Graduate Prerequisites: SPH PM 702 or SPH PH 719; or consent of instructor.
    This course describes how money works in health care. It examines how policy-makers and managers view and use money. It presents a variety of useful analytic techniques, and then explores alternative methods of employing money to shape more accessible, affordable, and effective health care. We examine current financial crises and managerial problems in health care along with alternative ways to remedy them. No financial or accounting background is assumed.
  • SPH PM 736: Human Resource Management in Public Health
    Graduate Prerequisites: SPH PH 719 and SPH PH 720; or consent of instructor.
    This course provides students with a skills-based orientation to human resource management, especially in a public health or human services setting. Core human resource management activities such as staffing, training and development, compensation, and employee relations are explored via readings, cases, and experiential activities. Using case examples that illustrate basic principles, students develop strategies to improve human resources practices through job analysis, selection, training, compensation, and employee relations, while developing an awareness of the unique aspects of the health care workforce that affect human resource management in such settings.
  • SPH PM 740: Comparative Health Systems and Policy in Industrialized and BRIC Countries
    Graduate Prerequisites: SPH PH719 or consent of instructor.
    This course examines the population and individual health systems of industrialized and emerging countries, exploring each system's historic, cultural, political, economic and demographic antecedents. There are significant variations in organization, finance, structure, operations and population level outcomes. Since the US health system performs at the top of cost and the low end of outcome measures there are lessons to be learned from other systems, but it is essential first to understand why differences among systems developed and persist.
  • SPH PM 755: Health Care Delivery Systems: Issues and Innovations
    Graduate Prerequisites: (SPHPM702 or SPHPH719) or consent of instructor.
    This required intermediate course in the Health Policy Management concentration is designed as a hands-on introduction to the complex organizational and delivery aspects of many levels of health care--primary care, mental health, long term care and hospital-based care. Students are introduced to concepts such as Patient Centered Medical Home, the Chronic Care Model, patient-centered care, care coordination, team-based care (teamlets), the Institute of Medicine's six aims for improvement and the IOM's 10 Rules for Redesign, and implementation science frameworks. Students select a health care problem/policy of their choice to research and potentially solve. This will involve students' examining the barriers and facilitators to achieving quality health care as described in this policy, and conducting field-based interviews with experts in this area to learn more about their perspectives on this health care problem. Using the Chronic Care Model, students will describe a new policy that meets the IOM's Six Aims for Improvement or 10 Rules for Redesign. Then, using the Consolidated Framework for Implementation Research, students will discuss the steps needed to bring their new policy into action. Written and group work, self-reflections, peer review, a professional presentation, and a final policy brief compose the graded assignments during this course
  • SPH PM 758: Introduction to Mental Health Services
    Graduate Prerequisites: SPH PH 719 and SPH PH 720; or consent of instructor.
    The purpose of this course is to develop a basic understanding of the mental health service delivery system and its relationship to public health and to the health care delivery system. Topics include a description of mental health services, epidemiology of mental health disorders, the current delivery system, mental health managed care, innovations in mental health services, and mental health policy, financing, and standards of treatment. Other issues such as parity, consumer and family advocacy movements, and issues relevant to children and adolescents are also discussed.
  • SPH PM 760: Health Law, Policy and Policymaking
    Graduate Prerequisites: SPH PH 719; or consent of instructor.
    This course is an introduction to the institutions, processes, and politics of United States government; how they were designed and how they actually operate today. The first month will be spent building a foundation of political science and legal theory dealing with concepts of power, institutional design, representation, interests and public opinion. Each subsequent week will feature an in-depth look at how government approaches a given issue. We will focus on instances of policymaking that have shaped health care and population health in America. This approach will help students not only become familiar with what happened, but why. History is not inevitable. Examining moments of policymaking will equip students to not only understand but also to anticipate and influence government policymaking.
  • SPH PM 776: Managerial Skills for Problem Solving
    Graduate Prerequisites: SPH PM702 or IH704 AND PM721. Students must be willing to share experiences in class, and attendance is mandatory. Closed to web registration; to apply, complete application available from HPM.
    Students explore a variety of problems that they face as managers and leaders, learn self-discovery and interpersonal skills useful in solving these problems, and have opportunities to practice applying those skills, through the analysis of their own experiences in organizations. The aim of the course is to provide skills and confidence that students can use to face and solve interpersonal problems. The class also introduces students to systems thinking as a way to map and manage the underlying dynamics that produce managerial problems. Specific skills relevant to the case problems are developed through reading assignments, written case analysis, interactive class exercises, real-world practice, and lectures.