Task Force Meeting and Gaming Session: Games for a New Climate

Sponsored by Boston University’s Frederick S. Pardee Center for the Study of the Longer-Range Future in collaboration with the Red Cross/Red Crescent Climate Centre.

Task Force Chair: Pablo Suarez (Visiting Fellow, Pardee Center)

Climate Games 2Participatory games are emerging as one approach that can facilitate linking knowledge with action. In the context of growing climate risks ranging from hurricanes to sea level rise, the challenge is to communicate complex scientific and policy concepts in such a way that is easily understood by those affected, and also yields changes in outlook and behavior.

Academic and field research have shown participatory game-based methods to be a useful strategy for melding personal experience with shared experiences centered on knowledge creation and dissemination, helping new information and concepts resonate in ways that “stick.” Keeping important issues such as equity, gender, and power in mind, participatory games can harness the tools of communication to produce more engaged, well-informed, and better-prepared communities.

Task Force on Games for a New Climate

On March 26, 2012, a small group of scholars and practitioners met at Boston University to review and discuss the real-world applications of participatory games and experiential learning in important decisions related to climate, development, disasters, and humanitarian work. The outcome of this meeting is a Pardee Center Task Force Report.

To read more about the Task Force meeting click here.

Games for a New Climate from Pardee Center on Vimeo.

Gaming Session -  The Practical Applications

Related to the Task Force, Boston University convened a day-long workshop titled “Games for a New Climate” on Tuesday, March 27, 2012. The overarching goal was to explore the potential of participatory games for accelerating learning, fostering dialogue, and promoting action affecting the longer-range future. The emphasis was on humanitarian and development decisions, particularly those involving climate risk management.

In addition to the five game sessions, two panels made of experts from the Task Force discussed how and why games can be used, their experience using games as a learning tool, and the future of games as a tool for increasing the understanding of climate risks.

It was held at Barristers Hall at the BU School of Law and was open to Boston University students and faculty.

To read more about the Gaming Session click here.

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