Category: Richard Primack

Probing climate change winners, losers among state’s wildlife

May 25th, 2015 in 2015, College and Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, Newsmakers, Richard Primack, Worcester Telegram & Gazette 0 comments

primack-thoreau1Telegram & Gazette
Richard Primack, College of Arts & Sciences

Will there be a time when the state’s official bird will be driven out of the commonwealth because it will no longer be able to survive in a changing climate?…

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Future Spring Won’t Be Pretty

March 23rd, 2015 in 2015, College and Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, Newsmakers, Richard Primack 0 comments

primack-thoreau1New York Magazine
Richard Primack, College of Arts & Sciences

It’s officially spring, and even if it doesn’t seem like it on the East Coast, soon enough flowers will start blooming earlier than ever…

Expert quote:

“A lot of things are changing, but it depends on where you are. I’m in Boston.”

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Carleton student’s research finds mystery in tree leaves

September 18th, 2014 in 2014, College and Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, Newsmakers, Richard Primack 0 comments

primack-thoreau1Ottawa Citizen
Richard Primack, College of Arts & Sciences

In an age when biology means studying molecules, Zoe Panchen has gone into the forest to look at plants — great big ones — and the simple-sounding topic of leaves…

Expert quote:

“Prior to this study, no one would have suspected that there was so much difference in the leafing out times of different species.”

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Co-authors gone bad – how to avoid publishing conflicts

July 10th, 2014 in 2014, College and Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, Newsmakers, OP-EDs by BU Professors, Richard Primack 0 comments

primack-thoreau1ElsevierConnect
Co-written by Richard Primack, College of Arts & Sciences

Conservation biology and related areas of science are increasingly collaborative endeavors. For most of us, working in teams can improve the quality of our research by bringing together people with complementary areas of expertise, generating and refining ideas, and writing and revising manuscripts…

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Diving into Thoreau’s ‘Walden’

May 26th, 2014 in 2014, Boston Globe, College and Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, Newsmakers, Richard Primack 0 comments

primack-thoreau1Boston Globe (subscription required)
Richard Primack, College of Arts & Sciences

Every age gets the Thoreau it deserves. Since “Walden; or, Life in the Woods” was published in 1854, this crank genius has been alternately held up as our greatest nature writer, the icon of American individualism, the firebrand dissenter, the sage of simplicity, the transcendental mystic, or the in-your-face libertarian…

Expert quote:

“[i]ce too thin for skating and walking would’ve shocked Thoreau.”

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For Northeast, a harsh vision of climate change

May 7th, 2014 in 2014, Boston Globe, College and Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, Newsmakers, Richard Primack 0 comments

primack-thoreau1Boston Globe (subscription required)
Richard Primack, College of Arts & Sciences

The Northeast is bearing the brunt of climate change in the nation, assaulted by heat waves, torrential rains, and flooding that are the result of human action, according to a federal report released Tuesday…

Expert quote:

“The report highlights the enormous financial impacts that climate change is going to have and it describes a lot of the adaptation mechanisms that we need to start implementing, including building sea walls to deal with rising sea levels, methods to drain floodwaters, conserving water, and shifting our crop species.”

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Springing Forward, and Its Consequences

April 23rd, 2014 in 2014, College and Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, New York Times, Newsmakers, Richard Primack 0 comments

primack-thoreau1New York Times
Richard Primack, College of Arts & Sciences

This is a busy time of year for Richard B. Primack, a biologist at Boston University. He and his colleagues survey the plants growing around Concord, Mass., recording the first day they send up flowers and leaves…

Expert quote: 

“It’s just much later compared to our recent memories of spring.”

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Eye on weather: The spring forecast

March 30th, 2014 in 2014, College and Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, Newsmakers, Pamela Templer, Richard Primack 0 comments

WBZ
Richard Primack, College of Arts & Sciences
Pamela Templer, College of Arts & Sciences

From the April Fool’s Blizzard of 1997 to the record floods of May 2006 to the sizzling heat of the 2012 Boston Marathon, we are vulnerable to a veritable potpourri of weather in the spring…

View video of experts Richard Primack and Pamela Templer

The New Spring, Brought To You By Climate Change, In Five Charts

March 21st, 2014 in 2014, College and Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, Newsmakers, RESEARCH @ BU, Richard Primack 0 comments

primack-thoreau1Popular Science
Richard Primack, College of Arts & Sciences

As the planet warms, the temperatures that trigger spring arrive earlier. But not everything’s adjusting on the same schedule. Flowers open before their insect pollinators come out, and birds return from migration too late to find their usual bug meals…

Expert quote:

“They’re probably the oldest detailed records of flower and bird-migration times in the United States.”

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Study: Rockies’ wildflower season 35 days longer from climate change

March 17th, 2014 in 2014, College and Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, Los Angeles Times, Newsmakers, Richard Primack 0 comments

primack-thoreau1Los Angeles Times
Richard Primack, College of Arts & Sciences

The Rocky Mountain wildflower season has lengthened by over a month since the 1970s, according to a study published Monday that found climate change is altering the flowering patterns of more species than previously thought…

Expert quote:

“It is probably the most detailed, long-term data set on flowering times that exists in the United States and perhaps even the world.”

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