Boston University Names University Professor Herbert Mason United Methodist Scholar/teacher of the Year

in College and Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, Humanities/Social Science, News Releases
March 28th, 2001

Contact: Sarah Godbout, 617-358-1240 | sgodbout@bu.edu

(Boston, Mass.) — Boston University has named University Professor Herbert Mason United Methodist Scholar/Teacher of the Year for the academic year 2000-2001 in recognition of his outstanding teaching in the fields of history and religion.

In keeping with its support of higher education, the United Methodist Church established the Scholar/Teacher Award to recognize the contributions made to scholarship and to the art of teaching by outstanding faculty members at universities historically affiliated with the United Methodist Church. BU traces its founding to the Newbury Biblical Institute, the first Methodist seminary in the United States.

Professor Mason is a University Professor and Professor of History and Religion in the College of Arts and Sciences. In addition to covering the special field of Arabic and Islamic studies, his teaching includes the presentation of worldviews in the classical Mediterranean, Mesopotamian and early Celtic traditions of mythology and literature. His best known work is Gilgamesh, A Verse Narrative, which was nominated for the National Book Award in 1971. Other publications include his four-volume translation of La Passion d’al-Hallaj of Louis Massignon for the Bollingen Series (1983), and Hallaj (1995). He is an elected member of numerous international professional associations, and vice president of the Institut Louis Massignon of Paris.

Boston University has been historically affiliated with the United Methodist Church since 1839 when the Newbury Biblical Institute, the first Methodist seminary in the United States was established in Newbury, Vermont. After relocating to Boston, the institute served as the foundation on which Boston University was built.

Boston University is the fourth-largest independent university in the United States, with an enrollment of nearly 30,000 students in its 16 schools and colleges. The University offers an exceptional grounding in the liberal arts, a broad range of programs in the arts, sciences, engineering, and professional areas, and state-of-the-art facilities for teaching and research.

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