Visiting Researchers

The following visiting researchers are affiliated with the Center for the Study of Asia:

Amod Lele (Fall 2013 – Spring 2015)

Amod Lele holds a PhD from Harvard University in the study of religion with a specialization in South Asia, an MS from Cornell University in development sociology and a BA in urban geography. He taught Indian philosophy as a Lecturer in the BU CAS philosophy department in spring 2014.  His dissertation examined the ethics of the Indian Buddhist philosopher Ś?ntideva, and his master’s thesis was a comparative study of the roles of Hinduism and Confucianism in the politics of India and Singapore. He published an article based on that thesis in Asian Studies Review. He has been a professor of Hindu traditions and religious studies at Colorado College and Stonehill College. He works at Boston University as an educational technologist. This year he cofounded the Indian Philosophy Blog, a group blog in Indian philosophy, and has written an online bibliography on Hindu ethics forthcoming from Oxford University Press. He is currently writing an article about the blog and another on the connections between Ś?ntideva’s ethics and metaphysics, as well as turning last year’s BUCSA talk into a publishable article.

Charlotte Mason (November 2012 – October 2015)

Charlotte Mason was the co-founder and director of The China Exchange Initiative (CEI) in Newton, Massachusetts, from 1999 to 2012.  CEI was formed in 1999 and funded by the Freeman Foundation to create exchange programs, educational partnerships, and shadowing programs for school administrators between schools in the U.S. and China.  CEI continues to create networks of schools in states and regions in the U.S. and China.  In 2000, Charlotte Mason co-chaired the National Commission for Asia in the Schools to increase the quality and quantity of instruction about Asia in schools throughout the United States.  Mason was a teacher in Newton, Massachusetts, and an exchange teacher at the Beijing-Jingshan School in 1989.  Upon her return from China in 1989, she served as co-chair of the Newton-Beijing Jingshan School Exchange Program, which was founded in 1979, and which continues to thrive.

Over a period of twenty-five years, as a frequent visitor in many kinds and levels of schools in China, and, then, over a period of thirteen years, as Director of CEI, working with hundreds of Chinese and U.S. principals in CEI’s shadowing programs in both China and the U.S., she has observed and collected data about the relative strengths (and weaknesses) of schools in China and the U.S. At Boston University, she is planning to do a comparative study of schools in the U.S. and China at pre-college levels. She will compare mission statements, student experiences, the roles and perceptions of teachers and school leaders, the aim (and relevance) of curricula, and the ability of the schools to meet the expectations of society.

Grant Rhode (November 2012 – October 2015)

Grant F. Rhode holds an M.St. from the University of Oxford in the social anthropology of China and a Ph.D. from the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy at Tufts University in Asian diplomatic history and foreign policies.  In addition to being a Visiting Researcher at the Boston University Center for the Study of Asia, he is an Associate in Research at the Fairbank Center for Chinese Studies at Harvard University.

While affiliated with BUCSA, Dr. Rhode will continue research in three areas: China educational exchange, Asian maritime issues, and Asian strategic leadership. As the current chair of the Brookline China Exchange Program, Dr. Rhode works on U.S.-China student exchange, especially at the pre-college level.  His maritime research is focused on China’s involvements in the East and South China Seas.  His work on Asian leaders is currently focused on comparing the strategic leadership of Deng Xiaoping and Lee Kuan Yew.

Yongdong Shen (September 2012 – August 2013)

Yongdong Shen is a PhD candidate at Zhejiang University. At Boston University he is completing analytical and empirical research required for his PhD thesis comparing American and Chinese industrial associations, in particular, their role during economic transitions.

Cen Shuhai (March 2012 – December 2013)

Dr. Cen Shuhai is Associate Professor of Politics in the School of Sociology and Public Administration at East China University of Science and Technology. He holds a PhD in Political Theory and his Introduction to Politics texbook is forthcoming in 2013. At Boston University, he is conducting research in the areas of politics and governance, with a concentration on nationalism, legitimacy, and political party systems under the direction of Joseph Fewsmith.