Boston University Law Review Online

Boston University Law Review Online, formerly known as the Boston University Law Review Annex, is Boston University Law Review’s online publication featuring symposia, essays, perspectives, and student notes.


Rodrigo’s Reappraisal

Richard Delgado & Jean Stefancic
Online Symposium: Critical Legal Research: The Next Wave (A Panel in Honor of Richard Delgado and Jean Stefancic).
101 B.U. L. Rev. Online 48 (2021). 

“Actually, I was hoping to talk to you about one aspect of that very subject—categorization. That and critical race theory. Do you have a minute?” […]


Prophets for an Algorithmic Age

Nicholas Mignanelli
Online Symposium: Critical Legal Research: The Next Wave (A Panel in Honor of Richard Delgado and Jean Stefancic).
101 B.U. L. Rev. Online 41 (2021). 

Adapting Nicholas F. Stump’s Critical Legal Research framework, I recommend that law librarians contend with this phenomenon by participating in algorithmic activism, practicing transgressive and archeological bibliography, and emphasizing the importance of “unplugged brainstorming” in their pedagogy. With my earlier article as a foundation, I will use the remaining pages of this Essay to further engage Professors Delgado and Stefancic’s commentary on the “triple helix dilemma” in the hope of suggesting where scholarship on AI and legal research might go from here. […]


Using Principles of Critical Information Theory to Teach Progressive Approaches to Regulatory Research

Julie Graves Krishnaswami
Online Symposium: Critical Legal Research: The Next Wave (A Panel in Honor of Richard Delgado and Jean Stefancic).
101 B.U. L. Rev. Online 38 (2021). 

Regulatory research taught from the perspective of critical information theory is a pathway for the consideration of (1) regulatory transparency, (2) agency accountability, (3) due process and fundamental fairness in the context of agency adjudication and rulemaking, (4) private-public partnerships, and (5) agency expertise and discretion. […]


Biases in Law Library Subject Headings

Grace Lo
Online Symposium: Critical Legal Research: The Next Wave (A Panel in Honor of Richard Delgado and Jean Stefancic).
101 B.U. L. Rev. Online 26 (2021). 

This Article focuses on the LCSH strand of the “triple helix” and how it continues to contribute to the “dilemma” identified by Delgado and Stefancic. Part I explains what the LCSH is and its role in codifying biases into research. Part II discusses two recent examples of movements to change specific subject headings in the LCSH as case studies in how different sources and perspectives are evaluated in canonizing authorized terms. Finally, Part III examines how long-standing, historical problems of bias in cataloging continue into modern day research tools like search engine algorithms. […]


Invisible Hands and the Triple (Quadruple?) Helix Dilemma: Helping Students Free Their Minds

Yasmin Sokkar Harker
Online Symposium: Critical Legal Research: The Next Wave (A Panel in Honor of Richard Delgado and Jean Stefancic).
101 B.U. L. Rev. Online 17 (2021). 

Legal education should be liberating, and legal research classrooms and law libraries can be sites of liberation. They can be places where students discover the potential to oversee their own development, both professional and personal. They can be places where students see the possibilities in their world and envision themselves as agents of social change. They can be places where students discover their roles as lawyers and the potential to change the law itself. One way to foster liberatory thinking is through critical information literacy. […]


“Non-Reformist Reforms” in Radical Social Change: A Critical Legal Research Exploration

Nicholas F. Stump
Online Symposium: Critical Legal Research: The Next Wave (A Panel in Honor of Richard Delgado and Jean Stefancic).
101 B.U. L. Rev. Online 6 (2021). 

The contemporary Critical Legal Research (“CLR”) project exhibits much diverse and vital thought. However, this Essay draws, in particular, on CLR strains in the explicit Marxist- and socialist-steeped traditions. […]