• Art Jahnke

    Senior Contributing Editor

    Art Janke

    Art Jahnke began his career at the Real Paper, a Boston area alternative weekly. He has worked as a writer and editor at Boston Magazine, web editorial director at CXO Media, and executive editor in Marketing & Communications at Boston University, where his work was honored with many awards. Profile

Comments & Discussion

Boston University moderates comments to facilitate an informed, substantive, civil conversation. Abusive, profane, self-promotional, misleading, incoherent or off-topic comments will be rejected. Moderators are staffed during regular business hours (EST) and can only accept comments written in English.

There are 14 comments on A Bold New Plan to Reduce the University’s Waste

  1. An excellent article, easy to read and comprehend. Art has gone into depths of the problem, and how BU is planning to tackle them in practical ways to ultimately reduce waste, and help the environment.

    The issue of recycling furniture came up multiple times. I remember, back in 80s MIT had a place called ‘Furniture exchange’ where students to faculty could get sometimes pretty decent furniture at a hugely discounted price. I still may have one or two of those lying around. Go BU!
    Thank you Art for this illuminating article.

    1. I remember that furniture exchange at MIT Building N52. I picked up a nice drafting chair from it… back when drafting chairs were a thing…

    2. That is such a great idea and something I’ve thought BU should adapt for years. There is SO MUCH waste each year when students move out of on-campus (and off-campus) housing.

  2. This is great work!

    Congratulations to Dennis Carlberg and the entire BU team for taking a leadership role in showing how to work toward implementing goals that are absolutely necessary for our society as a whole,

    I am confident that Prof. Carlberg will prove his thesis that reduction of waste will be an economic boom and improve the quality of life on the campus.

    We need more institutions to lead the way to meet the goals that are often sincerely hoped for but abandoned when short term pressures, inertia, and convenience drive the major planning decisions of large institutions.

  3. Amazing! I was so excited to hear about this in the President’s Townhall meeting and so see how BU will become a leader in this area. I often think that universities are all about the future, so this commitment to protecting the future is incredibly valuable.

  4. I appreciate the information about recycling. I saw that masks and gloves go into the trash and have often wondered what is going to happen with all of the disposable masks, gloves, and PPE. I work at a federal airport and often see masks on the ground and we use a lot of gloves every day that go into the trash.

    I wondered if any companies are working towards a recycling solution specifically for PPE?

    1. Agreed! And perhaps we could also get BU-maintained composting buckets added to all communal staff-faculty kitchens?
      I’m also mind blown that the university continues to pay for K-cups for those same kitchens – how can we move past that?

  5. Great article! We all need to be reminded about being mindful of the speed at which we consume and discard. Recycling is a must, but for me reducing is key, specially at the individual level. Recently I found myself searching on the shampoo/conditioner pharmacy section and had the realization that the consumerism culture had tricked us on thinking we needed plastic bottled goods for washing our hair, clothes, or dishes. Oh my, what I pile of plastic bottles we must have generated during our lives! So, our family have switched to powder soap for the dishwasher and laundry (it all comes on a simple cardboard box), and we use a plain soap bar for body and hair. Just like when I was growing up in Spain!

  6. Agreed! And perhaps we could also get BU-maintained composting buckets added to all communal staff-faculty kitchens?
    I’m also mind blown that the university continues to pay for K-cups for those same kitchens – how can we move past that?

  7. Excellent recommendations in the Zero Waste Plan! Indeed, we all need to be part of the solution. Small changes in our everyday habits and choices make a big difference when we act collectively.

Post a comment.

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *