Courses

The listing of a course description here does not guarantee a course’s being offered in a particular semester. Please refer to the published schedule of classes on the Student Link for confirmation a class is actually being taught and for specific course meeting dates and times.

  • COM FT 412: Screenwriting II
    Undergraduate Prerequisites: COM FT 411; Grade of B+ or better in COM FT 411.
    Further study of narrative screenwriting, dramatic structure, and character development. Each student will develop and write a full feature-length screenplay. First draft materials will be discussed in class and will be revised for the final project.
  • COM FT 457: American Masterworks
    Subjects vary with the instructor. Directors discussed include D. W. Griffith, Charlie Chaplin, Buster Keaton, King Vidor, Frank Borzage, Victor Fleming, Howard Hawks, Frank Capra, Alfred Hitchcock, John Ford, John Huston, Elia Kazan, George Cukor, Orson Welles, Robert Altman, John Cassavetes, and Woody Allen.
  • COM FT 458: International Masterworks
    An eclectic and unsystematic survey of a small number of the supreme masterworks of international film created by some of the greatest artists of the past eighty years. The focus in on cinematic style. What does style do? Why are certain cinematic presentations highly stylized? What is the difference from realistic, representational work? We will consider the special ways of knowing, thinking, and feeling that highly stylized works of art create and devote all of our attention to the function of artistic style and form to create new experiences and ways of thinking and feeling.
  • COM FT 466: Special Topics
  • COM FT 468: Production III
    Undergraduate Prerequisites: COM FT 402; application required
    This is an honors thesis class for undergraduates who have taken Production II as well as other high-level production classes, such as Directing, Cinematography, Sound Design, Motion Picture Editing, etc. Students apply to the class as either as producers, directors, cinematographers, editors, sound designers and production designers. Directors submit scripts for consideration. The production faculty then selects eight directors, based on the scripts and each candidate's previous work. Faculty then selects the producers, cinematographers, editors, sound designers, and production designers based on their previous production work and their ability to work as members of a team. The class forms production teams to make eight thesis- quality films that can compete with the best student films in America. Maximum running time for each film is fifteen minutes.
  • COM FT 491: Directed Studies
    Undergraduate Prerequisites: consent of supervising faculty and department chair
    Individual projects; opportunity for advanced students who have completed a major portion of their degree requirements to engage in-depth tutorial study with specific faculty in an area not normally covered by regular curriculum offerings.
  • COM FT 492: Directed Studies
    Undergraduate Prerequisites: consent of supervising faculty and department chair
    Individual projects; opportunity for advanced students who have completed a major portion of their degree requirements to engage in-depth tutorial study with specific faculty in an area not normally covered by regular curriculum offerings.
  • COM FT 493: Internship
    Undergraduate Prerequisites: At least junior standing, a 3.0 or higher in COM, and completion of FT310 and one of FT303 or FT353.
    Opportunity for students to gain professional experience at television and radio stations, film and video production houses, and other media institutions. Responsibilities vary. Availability depends on market needs.
  • COM FT 494: Internship
    Undergraduate Prerequisites: At least junior standing, a 3.0 or higher in COM, and completion of FT310 and one of FT303 or FT353.
    Opportunity for students to gain professional experience at television and radio stations, film and video production houses, and other media institutions. Responsibilities vary. Availability depends on market needs.
  • COM FT 500: Writing Film Criticism
    This course examines the art of film and television criticism and gives students extensive practice in writing about film and TV in a way that balances informed, insightful analysis and lively writing. Students write several film and TV reviews, each covering a different type of film or TV show, as well as a longer think piece. Students will review films currently playing in local theaters and TV shows currently available on broadcast, cable or other internet platforms, such as Netflix, Hulu, Amazon and the like. Key critics discussed include James Agee, Andrew Sarris, Pauline Kael, Roger Ebert, Emily Nussbaum, Matt Zoller Seitz, Anthony Lane, Manohla Dargis and A.O. Scott. Effective Fall 2020, this course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Aesthetic Exploration, Critical Thinking.
    • Aesthetic Exploration
    • Critical Thinking
  • COM FT 502: Sound Design for Film and Television
    Undergraduate Prerequisites: COM FT 353.
    Graduate Prerequisites: COM FT 707.
    A comprehensive technical examination of the role of sound as an emotional motivator and major storytelling component in both fiction and nonfiction films. Covers location sound recording, acoustic theory, track building, foley and dialog replacement, and mix preparation, as well as music editing and composition. Introduces a variety of postproduction pathways and technologies, including current digital innovations in the field and in audio postproduction, and provides an ongoing workshop for solving editing and track building problems.
  • COM FT 503: TV to Tablets
    This course examines how film and television companies are racing to catch, keep pace with, and monetize emerging new technology. The course provides students with an overview of how leading film and TV brands have evolved their creative, strategic, and content distribution processes to sustain competetive value and to reap the monetary and reach benefits of new distribution platforms.
  • COM FT 504: Post production FX Editing
    Undergraduate Prerequisites: COM FT 353.
    Graduate Prerequisites: COM FT 707.
    This course teaches all aspects of video post production including window dubbing, rough cuts, A/B editing, non-linear editing, digital graphics, digital sound, and the integration of all of these processes and technologies that apply to the postproduction completion of video projects. Familiarity with Macintosh computers is desirable. Experience with video timecode editing is a necessity.
  • COM FT 505: Television Production Hothouse
    Undergraduate Prerequisites: COM FT 353; a 3.0 COM GPA
    Graduate Prerequisites: COM FT 707 and COM FT 727; a 3.2 COM GPA
    Undergraduate Prerequisites: COM FT 325 and COM FT 353; a 3.0 COM GPA Graduate Prerequisites: COM FT 707 and COM FT 727; a 3.2 COM GPA This is a class that operates as a student-run, client-driven production company. Projects include PSA's and web videos for local, national, and international non- profits. GPA of 3.0 or higher. 4 credits only.
  • COM FT 506: Digital Game St
  • COM FT 507: Television Studio Production
    Undergraduate Prerequisites: COM FT 201; COM FT 201 or Instructor Consent
    Course presents the requisite strategies, processes, technology, and skills training to successfully create live multi-camera productions. Emphasizes the roles and responsibilities of the director and producer. Intended outcome is for students to demonstrate proficiency in the academic, practical, and professional components established for the course. 4 cr, either sem.
  • COM FT 508: Line Producing for Undergrads
    Undergraduate Prerequisites: FT353
    Any film- even a very short one- requires the making of thousands of decisions. How long do we shoot? How many mouths do we feed? How much will the props cost? This course offers systems for arriving at intelligent answers to these myriad questions. In covering logistics of getting a media production made, the course addressed how to catalog all the practical considerations that go into a production, how to schedule a shoot, how to budget a production and how to plan for distribution of the final product.
  • COM FT 510: Social Activism Documentary
    Undergraduate Prerequisites: COM FT 353.
    This course explores how documentary can be used as a tool for social change. A hybrid of studies and production, the class will be dually-devoted to looking at films that have successfully instigated change (social, corporate, political, etc.), and making socially-conscious, activism oriented films that tell stories about important issues in the local Boston community. It will take a three-pronged approach towards these objectives: 1. Documentary filmmaking techniques and practices 2. Social activism documentary theory and application 3. Local activism and community-based learning within the Boston community
  • COM FT 512: Writing Episodic Drama for Television
    Undergraduate Prerequisites: COM FT 310.
    Deals with the process and techniques of writing a dramatic series for commercial network and cable television. Students will select a current prime-time drama, develop A, B, and (possibly) C stories for an episode, and complete a Writer's Draft and polished First Draft, suitable for a Writer Portfolio. Lectures will include the life of a working television writer, one-hour story, structure, genres, and character development. We will view and analyze TV series from the past and present, and focus on proper drama script format, character development and voice.
  • COM FT 514: Writing the Television Pilot
    Undergraduate Prerequisites: COM FT 512 or COM FT 522.
    Graduate Prerequisites: COM FT 512 or COM FT 522.
    Prereq FT 512 or FT 522. "Writing the TV Drama (or dramedy) Pilot," explores the creation and development of your very own "one-hour" Television Series Pilot. Each student will pitch a concept, write a treatment, outline and pilot script. Also, you'll create a "leave behind" document, which will consist of an overview of your series, complete with character descriptions, future episode ideas and much more. We will closely examine the ingredients of a pilot script through lectures, script analyses of successful pilots, written assignments and group workshops.