Capstone 2015 Begins on March 27

March 27th, 2015 in Feature


Capstone 2015The BU librarians have prepared a Capstone Research Guide to assist you with the research process.  The Guide includes links to recommended databases and other useful reference resources.

Please contact us if you have any questions.

CAPSTONE 2015 (CGS)

March 27th, 2015 in

Join us for a library research session:

* Work with your group in the PAL lounge (3rd floor Mugar Library)
* Librarians available for extra help with your research
* Quick tutorials on using subject databases

Sat 3/28 (1-4p), Sun 3/29 (1-4p), Mon 3/30 (2-5p), Tue 3/31 (2-5p), Wed 4/1 (2-4p)

Start your research at www.bu.edu/library

Quick Tips on using BULSearch:

  • After you search a term, Sign In to see additional results, services, and request options.
    • You can save research to your personal e-Shelf by clicking the e-Shelf Icon Off icon (IMPORTANT: items will not save without sign-in!).
    • You can request checked-out books from other libraries (available for pick-up in 3 days).
  • look on the left side to refine your search by format (e.g., books), creation date, or other parameters.
  • BULSearch covers the collections of multiple BU Libraries, including the Pappas Law Library Annex (in the basement of Mugar, with a separate entrance).
While BULSearch is great for retrieving articles, books, and some government documents, it does not include most newspaper content and specialized library resources. Fill in the research gaps by using some of the resources and databases listed below.

About Subject Databases:

We currently subscribe to over 350 databases differentiated by discipline (e.g., history) and/or content genre (newspapers; government documents; statistics, etc.)

From ProQuest:

(Hint: Create your own ProQuest family of databases to search – use the ProQuestdbselect link to select.)

From EBSCOHost:

(Hint: Create your own EBSCOhost family of databases to search – go to a database, then use the ebscodbselect link at the top of the page.)

More databases…

Databases for current news, newspaper articles:

More newspaper article sources…

Finding legislation (and other government documents)

BULSearch retrieves some, but not all, of this material.

 

PACS , Voting Records, and Finances

 

About Think Tanks, IGOs and NGOs

What is a think tank?

A think tank is a research institute staffed with an interdisciplinary group of experts providing advice and ideas on policy issues in business, government and international affairs. Many think tanks are non-profit organizations, while others are funded by governments, advocacy groups, or private interests. Much of the research is public (and free) through their websites, and the paper authors often have academic affiliations.

While most of the material discovered through these organizations is trustworthy, the papers produced may reflect the ideology or bias of the sponsoring organization. If the paper does not provide a bibliographic source for facts presented, you might check to see if the author has published in scholarly journals as well (a quick BULSearch should suffice.)

Google ‘Thinktank’ Custom Search (search your topic – e.g., ‘internet privacy’)

NOTE: This search box, Google Scholar and the subscription database CIAO (Columbia International Affairs Online) will identify some specific content, but many reports can only be found by searching the organization’s site.

A few of the largest and best-known:

More think tanks…

Statistics Sources

More statistics sources…

Polls and Polling Sources

 

Research guides: (see here for A-Z list)

More research guides…

Energy & Environmental Law Society’s Inaugural Climate Change Conference, Friday at School of Law

March 26th, 2015 in Uncategorized

Dr. Kerry Emanuel of MIT will talk Friday about Climate Change, Extreme Weather, and Out Policy Respsonse tomorrow, March 27th in the GSU Conference Auditorium from 2:30 to 5:30 PM. RSVP required to ageorge4@bu.edu. More information at http://www.bu.edu/earth/2015/03/26/inaugural-climate-change-conference-friday-at-school-of-law/

Rhetoric 102

March 25th, 2015 in

A few sources for your research paper:

Boston University Library Search (BULS)
Searches most of the books and journals we own; you should also search the Databases A-Z list for a more comprehensive search.

Historical Abstracts
Historical coverage of the world from 1450 to the present; America: History and Life provides coverage of U.S. and Canadian history

Finding Newspapers
Search for our holdings (full-text and microfilm) of local, national and international newspapers.
To search the Boston Globe, type in the newspaper name  in the BULS box on the main library page.

New York Times Historical
The complete text of the New York Times since it began publication until the last three years; most recent issues can be searched in Lexis-Nexis or Factiva

If BU does not have the book, go to:
BU Worldcat Local–if a BLC library has the book, you can pick it up at Mugar Circulation Desk in a few business days; can’t request journal articles; but can request a book we own that is checked out.

Interlibrary Loan Services–you can pick up the  book at Mugar Circulation Desk in about a week; can’t request a book we own  that is checked out.

If BU does not have the article:

ILL

Click on “Get it from another library”

 

IR/GE 599: Science, Politics and Climate Change

March 25th, 2015 in

cover cover cover  cover cover cover
http://mitpress.mit.edu/sites/default/files/9780262512862.jpg

find journal articles

Additional sources:

Search Think Tank Content

The subscription database CIAO: Columbia international affairs online searches within many well-known think tanks, with a focus on International Relations.

The search box below is a custom search created in Google; it is in no way complete (there are over 6800 NGOs!), but may provide a useful starting point.

biofuels

Selected Think Tanks, NGOs/IGOs 


Current news

 

Finding legislation (and other government documents)

BULSearch retrieves some, but not all, of this material.

  • ProQuest Congressional includes:
    • CRS Reports, which provide high-quality, succinct research support to members of Congress.
    • Legislative Histories and Bill Tracking
    • Info on members of Congress, including voting records and campaign finance data
    • ProQuest legislative insight includes RollCall, Washington Post
  • AccessUN 1956+

 

Key documents/agreements

Polls and Polling Sources

Additional Research Guides

Environmental Law (Pappas Law Library)

International Environmental Law (ASIL)

_______________________________________________________________________________

appt2Prepared for Selin 3/24/15

CGS – Capstone 2015

March 24th, 2015 in

Join us for a library research session:

* Work with your group in the PAL lounge (3rd floor Mugar Library)
* Librarians available for extra help with your research
* Quick tutorials on using subject databases

Sat 3/28 (1-4p), Sun 3/29 (1-4p), Mon 3/30 (2-5p), Tue 3/31 (2-5p), Wed 4/1 (2-4p)

Start your research at www.bu.edu/library

Quick Tips on using BULSearch:

  • After you search a term, Sign In to see additional results, services, and request options.
    • You can save research to your personal e-Shelf by clicking the e-Shelf Icon Off icon (IMPORTANT: items will not save without sign-in!).
    • You can request checked-out books from other libraries (available for pick-up in 3 days).
  • look on the left side to refine your search by format (e.g., books), creation date, or other parameters.
  • BULSearch covers the collections of multiple BU Libraries, including the Pappas Law Library Annex (in the basement of Mugar, with a separate entrance).
While BULSearch is great for retrieving articles, books, and some government documents, it does not include most newspaper content and specialized library resources.  Fill in the research gaps by using some of the resources and databases listed below.

About Subject Databases:

We currently subscribe to over 350 databases differentiated by discipline (e.g., history) and/or content genre (newspapers; government documents; statistics, etc.)

From ProQuest:

(Hint: Create your own ProQuest family of databases to search – use the ProQuestdbselect link to select.)

From EBSCOHost:

(Hint: Create your own EBSCOhost family of databases to search – go to a database, then use the ebscodbselect link at the top of the page.)

More databases…

Databases for current news, newspaper articles:

More newspaper article sources…

Finding legislation (and other government documents)

BULSearch retrieves some, but not all, of this material.

 

PACS , Voting Records, and Finances

 

About Think Tanks, IGOs and NGOs

What is a think tank?

A think tank is a research institute staffed with an interdisciplinary group of experts providing advice and ideas on policy issues in business, government and international affairs. Many think tanks are non-profit organizations, while others are funded by governments, advocacy groups, or private interests. Much of the research is public (and free) through their websites, and the paper authors often have academic affiliations.

While most of the material discovered through these organizations is trustworthy, the papers produced may reflect the ideology or bias of the sponsoring organization. If the paper does not provide a bibliographic source for facts presented, you might check to see if the author has published in scholarly journals as well (a quick BULSearch should suffice.)

Google ‘Thinktank’ Custom Search (search your topic – e.g., ‘internet privacy’)

NOTE: This search box, Google Scholar and the subscription database CIAO (Columbia International Affairs Online) will identify some specific content, but many reports can only be found by searching the organization’s site.

 A few of the largest and best-known:

More think tanks…

Statistics Sources

More statistics sources…

Polls and Polling Sources

 

Research guides: (see here for A-Z list)

More research guides…

WR150 – Lincoln and His Legacy

March 23rd, 2015 in

www.bu.edu/library

top+textlucas

Use BULSearch (top page search box)…

to begin finding books and articles

maroon_arrow1 Beginning your research with books allows you to use the author’s bibliography – an excellent way to identify primary sources.

Each book has a unique call number, but books on similar topics are clustered together. A location chart available by the elevators, at reference and online tells you which floor contains that call number range, and floor plans at Reference help you pinpoint the location.

cover cover cover  cover

Use subscription databases…

for focused genre/subject searching

maroon_arrow1 Looking for historical newspapers? We have New York Times Historical and others (see the Newspapers Guide at http://www.bu.edu/library/guides/newspapers/) buchanan

maroon_arrow1 Looking for articles in history journals? Use America, history and life (Online)

 Use eShelf or RefWorks…

to save your research

maroon_arrow1 Easily save all your research references and access them from anywhere.

maroon_arrow1 RefWorks bonus – create bibliographies and insert them into your papers in the format you need – APA, Chicago, MLA, and others.

maroon_arrow1 Download ProCite to integrate RefWorks with your word-processing program.

Ask a Librarian for assistance…

that’s why we’re here!

maroon_arrow1 Visit the Mugar Research Center (353-2700) for immediate, walk-in help:sig

M-Th 9am – 9pm (Hours may vary over Holidays and summer)
F 9am – 5pm 
Sa 10am – 6pm
Su 12am – 8pm

maroon_arrow1 Need extra help? Consider making an appointment @ http://www.mybookingcalendar.com/bostonuniversitylibraries to talk with us for 1/2 hour or so.

maroon_arrow1 Quick question? Use ask-a-librarian to email or chat.

CGS RH102: Freakonomics

March 17th, 2015 in

statspotting  freakonomics liesdrugwar nudge janegame wiredfor acadadrift gamehumanities

Find Journal Articles

Searching Across Disciplines

Humanities

Social Science

Think Tanks

The search box below is a custom search created in Google to search think tank content; it is in no way complete, but may provide a useful starting point.

 Find Data

Browse Books and eBooks on . . .

Additional Sources

Getting articles in full text is easier than ever

March 17th, 2015 in Uncategorized

New this semester, there is an additional and easy route to full text that you should be aware of. We’ve combined the power of BU Libraries Search with the reach of the Interlibrary Loan “Illiad” system, so that you can get materials to BU from all over the world! Here’s how it works.

When searching for literature in many databases, you may find search results where a pdf of an article is not available. The article title is represented, and the Find @ BU icon as below.
ed full text not ft

First, try the Find @ BU icon, because it does work many times, like when the full text is accessible within JSTOR. But, in this case, this article is not in JSTOR. In fact, it’s not something we have available at BU, as you can see on the BU Libraries Search screen below.

no physical resource

Has this happened to you before? What is new this semester is that second line above, asking you to sign in. You can find the sign in button in the upper right hand corner of the page and it looks like this.

buls sign in

After you sign in through BU Web Login, the appearance of the BU Libraries Search record for the article changes slightly. Now you see a new link that reads “Get it from another library”, like this one below.

get it from

Simply click on that link, and you will be taken directly into the Interlibrary Loan service, Illiad.

If you have used Illiad once before to get materials delivered, the information about the article will be automatically entered into the correct fields for you!

ill filled out

Scan the fields to make sure they’re correct, submit the request, and you’ll likely have the article in just a couple days.

If you have any questions feel free to Ask a Librarian.

CC202 Keyword Generator

March 17th, 2015 in

The Keyword Generator from the University of Texas Libraries allows you to create a set of search terms that will help you find articles, books, and other sources on your topic.

Keyword Generator

Use this tool to generate search terms that you will bring to your meeting with a BU librarian.

Here’s how to do it:

1. Go to the Keyword Generator.
2. Enter your topic and click the Next button.
3. On the next screen, identify 2-4 key concepts within your research topic as instructed. Click on “See examples” to get an idea.
4. On the next few screens, enter related keywords for each concept as instructed. (It says a minimum of 3, but 2 or 3 for each concept would be best. If you are focused on a particular person you can leave out alternative terms for the person.) Again, you can click on “See examples” to get an idea.

When you’re done, you will create a colorful page that displays your search terms in several ways.

Whitman Keywords

 

At the bottom there will be a box that combines your search terms into a single search. 

Whitman Boolean

Save this combined set of search terms. This is the information you need to bring to your meeting with the librarian. 

There are a couple of ways to do this:

  1. Cut and paste the text and save it on your computer.
  2. Click where it says “Email Results” at the top of the page and enter your name and email address. You will receive an email with a link to your results page.

Questions? Email Ken Liss, BU Libraries at kliss@bu.edu