Abstract Review Guidelines

RATING GUIDELINES

Reviewers are asked to use the following criteria, as appropriate, for the abstracts they evaluate. Note that not all criteria will apply equally well to each abstract.

  1. Is the question or issue clearly stated?
  2. Is the significance of the work clearly stated? Is relevant previous work appropriately cited?
  3. If relevant, are the method, data collection, and analysis procedures well-designed and appropriate to the question addressed?
  4. Is the conceptual framework coherent? If relevant, is the theoretical analysis well-argued?
  5. Is the work original? Does it present new data (if relevant), particularly from less-studied languages?
  6. Is the work completed, or does it show very strong promise of being completed in time for the conference?
  7. Are the conclusions justified in relation to the data and/or analyses?
  8. Is the abstract written clearly and organized well?
  9. Is the topic of scientific, methodological or theoretical importance?
  10. Is the paper timely in terms of current issues of interest in the field of language development?
  11. Is the paper likely to be of interest to a reasonable number of attendees at BUCLD?

DEFINITIONS FOR CONTENT AREAS

[Note: These definitions are not exhaustive, but give an idea of the kinds of work we mean
to include in each of these areas. Definitions for learning conditions can be found here.]

Abnormal Brain Development Negation
Agreement Neighborhood Density
Anaphora/Binding Neurocognitive Mechanisms
Argument Structure Neurolinguistic Techniques
Articles Nominal Morphology
Aspect Null Arguments
Child-Directed Speech – Lexical and Syntactic Cues Optimality Theory
Child-Directed Speech – Phonetic and Segmentation Cues Optional or Root Infinitive
Clitics Phonetics
Code Switching Phonology – Formal/Generative
Complementizer Phrase Phonology -Non-Generative
Computational Modeling Pragmatics – Formal/Generative
Constructivist / Usage-Based Approaches Pragmatics -Non-Formal
Definiteness Priming
Determiner Phrase Prosody
Dialects and Diglossia Quantification
Discourse – Formal/Generative Relative Clauses
Discourse – Non-Generative Scope
Evidentials Semantics – Formal/Generative
Finiteness Semantics -Non-Formal/Generative
Focus Sentence Processing
Gesture Signed Languages
Grammatical Gender SLA
Individual Differences Social Factors
Infant Speech Processing Specificity
Instruction and Classroom Interaction Speech Perception
Joint Attention Speech Production
Language Socialization Statistical Learning
Language-Cognition Dissociation Syntax -Formal/Generative
Language-Conceptualization Interface Syntax -Non-Formal/Generative
Lexical Access and Retrieval Tense
Lexical Semantics Theory of Mind
Literacy and Reading Verbal Morphology
Linguistic Variation Vocabulary Size and Compositon
Morphology- Formal/Generative WH Questions
Morphology- Non-Generative Word Learning with Attentional Cues
Motion Events and Spatial Language Word Learning with Conceptual Cues
Movement Phenomena Word Learning with Perceptual Cues
Narrative Word Learning with Syntactic Cues

 

Abnormal Brain Development
language development of preterm infants, effect of brain injury on language, developmental language disorders
Agreement
grammatical agreement
Anaphora / Binding relationship between anaphors and antecedents

Argument Structure

relationship between verb and arguments — including: applicatives, benefactives, causatives, passives, transitivity, unaccusatives, unergatives
Articles
articles
Aspect marking of duration or type of temporal activity denoted by verb — including: telicity

Child-Directed Speech – Lexical and Syntactic Cues
characteristics of infant-directed and child-directed speech relevant to lexical and syntactic acquisition — including: definitions, expansions, explanations, labeling, lexical frequency, lexical specificity, negative evidence (explicit and implicit), questions, recast, repetition, sentence frames, topic contingency, turn-taking, word order
Child-Directed Speech – Phonetic and Segmentation Cues characteristics of infant-directed and child-directed speech relevant to segmentation and phoneme acquisition – including acoustic properties, articulation, distributional regularities, facial and head movements, phoneme frequency, phonetic contrasts, prosodic properties, sound patterns, speech rate
Clitics process of cliticization, nominal and verbal clitics
Code Switching use of two or more languages within one sentence or stretch of discourse, linguistic constraints on switching, language preference in bilinguals
Complementizer Phrase

phenomena involving the Complementizer Phrase, e.g. WH questions, complementizers, V2 structures

Computational Modeling

testing acquisition patterns using a computational model

Constructivist / Usage-Based Approaches constructivist or usage-based approach to language learning
Definiteness
definiteness
Determiner Phrase phenomena occurring in the Determiner Phrase, e.g. articles, demonstratives, possessives, quantifiers, noun phrases
Dialects and Diglossia
dialect, diglossia
Discourse – Formal/Generative formal approaches to dependencies and contingency relations between utterances — including: anaphora, cohesion, inter-sentential connectivity, reference

Discourse – Non-Generative

non-formal approaches to dependencies and contingency relations between utterances — including: anaphora, cohesion, conversational abilities, discourse markers, inter-sentential connectivity, reference

Evidentials
evidentials
Finiteness
finiteness
Focus
semantic and syntactic focus
Gesture pointing, iconic and metaphoric gestures, coordination between gesture and speech
Grammatical Gender
grammatical gender
Individual Differences
individual differences — among adult or child learners
Infant Speech Processing
infant speech processing
Instruction and Classroom Interaction effect of instructional methods on language learning, effect of classroom interaction on language learning (e.g. correction, feedback, input frequency, recast), effect of schooling on language behavior, effect of L1 use on language learning in L2 class
Joint Attention
the effect of joint attention on language development
Language Socialization using language for social purposes – including: honorifics, humor, in-group/out-group distinctions, morality, politeness, register, social identity, teasing, turn-taking
Language-Cognition
Dissociation
is there dissociation between language abilities and cognitive abilities,
especially in various types of language disorders?
Language-Conceptualization
Interface
linguistic relativity (effect of language structure on attention to conceptual distinctions and vice versa), ordering of conceptual understanding vs. acquisition of lexical item (i.e. does conceptual understanding in a domain precede lexical acquisition in that domain, or vice versa, or are both simultaneous?), relationship between problem-solving skills and language development
Lexical Access and Retrieval retrieval of words from mental lexicon, structure of information in mental lexicon
Lexical Semantics semantic features of words, prototypes of lexical categories, semantic networks, order of acquisition of words/word types in a lexical class on the basis of semantic factors
Linguistic Variation sociolinguistic variation — including: acquisition of socioindexical detail, dialect features, generational differences, genderlects, ethnolects, perception of variation
Literacy and Reading relationship between oral/signed language and reading/writing/spelling ability, determinants of literacy development, effect of book reading on language development, development of academic language, role of context in deriving meaning from text, role of phonological/morphological/syntactic awareness in learning to read, role of articulation and auditory processing in reading ability
Morphology – Formal/Generative generative analysis of word structure — including: agreement, case, classifiers, diminutives, gender, plurals, tense, verbal/nominal inflections
Morphology – Non-Generative non-generative analysis of word structure — including: agreement, case, classifiers, diminutives, gender, plurals, tense, verbal/nominal inflections
Motion Events and Spatial Language language pertaining to motion events and spatial relations — including: manner, path, goal, source, containment, support, prepositions of location
Movement Phenomena movement processes (or checking/indexing processes) — including: questions, raising, scrambling, subjacency, topicalization
Narrative personal narrative, story narrative, story retelling
Negation processes and constructions related to negation
Neighborhood Density
effect of neighborhood density and frequency on lexical acquisition
Neurocognitive Mechanisms
executive attention, memory, inhibition
Neurolinguistic Techniques
use of neurolinguistic techniques such as MEG, EEG, ERP, and fMRI
Neurolinguistics and Cognitive Mechanisms relationship between brain activation and language acquisition (e.g. MEG, EEG, ERP, fMRI), effect of brain injury on language, executive attention, memory, inhibition
Nominal Morphology classifiers, case markers, determiners, possessives
Null Arguments null subjects, null objects
Optimality Theory use of methods or concepts from Optimality Theory
Optional or Root Infinitive optional use of (root) infinitive forms
Phonetics characteristics of human speech sounds — including: clusters, epenthesis, phonotactics, rhyming, sonority, voice onset time, voicing, vowel harmony, vowel height
Phonology – Formal/Generative generative or formal analysis of the sound system of language – including: clusters, epenthesis, phonotactics, rhyming, sonority, voice onset time, voicing, vowel harmony
Phonology – Non-Generative generative or formal analysis of the sound system of language — including: accent, clusters, epenthesis, phonotactics, rhyming, sonority, voice onset time, voicing, vowel harmony
Pragmatics – Formal/Generative formal encoding of aspects of language use – including: deixis, focus, implicatures, presupposition, reference
Pragmatics – Non-Formal aspects of language use with focus on interaction between users — including: communicative competence, communicative intent, deixis, focus, implicature, new/given, presupposition, reference, refusals, requests, speech acts
Priming
syntactic and other types of priming
Prosody variations in accent, intonation, pitch, rhythm, tone
Quantification
quantification
Relative Clauses
relative clauses
Scope
semantic and syntactic scope
Semantics – Formal/Generative formally construed aspects of meaning — including: definiteness, entailment, evidentials, partitives, polarity, quantification, scope, specificity
Semantics – Non-Formal/Generative general aspects of meaning – including lexical semantics, metaphor, polysemy, word meaning
Sentence Processing relationship between encoding and production of syntax and morphology, ambiguity resolution, garden path sentences, reaction time
Signed Languages signed languages (using the manual modality) — including: structural aspects of specific signed languages, comparison of different signed languages, comparison of signed and spoken languages
SLA second language acquisition — including: adult and child learners, acquisition of L2 and L3+, individual differences among learners; universal, demographic, experiential, cognitive, social/affective, environmental factors

Social Factors

effect of social factors on language learning – including: ethnicity, exposure to schooling, gender, SES
Specificity
specificity
Speech Perception
perception and discrimination of phonetic contrasts, phoneme categorization, phonetic and phonological cues to segmentation of the speech stream, sensitivity to pitch and segmental information, role of visual information (e.g. lip movements) in speech perception
Speech Production
production of phonetic contrasts, role of phonetics in speech errors
Statistical Learning acquisition of a (rule-governed) aspect of language as a result of unconscious attention to distributional regularities in the input
Syntax – Formal/Generative generative approaches to sentence structure – including: agreement, anaphora, argument realization, benefactives, binding, classifiers, clitics, control, determiners, ellipsis, empty categories, finiteness, movement phenomena, negation, passives, phrase structure, possession, preposition stranding, psych predicates, questions, raising, relative clauses, scrambling, subjacency, tense, topicalization, word order
Syntax – Non-Formal/Generative non-generative approaches to sentence structure – including: agreement, anaphora, argument realization, benefactives, classifiers, clitics, determiners, ellipsis, finiteness, negation, passives, phrase structure, possession, preposition stranding, questions, relative clauses, tense, topicalization, word order
Tense
tense
Theory of Mind understanding of the thoughts of others – including: appearance/reality distinction, degree of certainty (e.g. know vs. think), false belief, mental state verbs, pretense, unexpected contents
Verbal Morphology agreement, finiteness, tense
Vocabulary Size and Composition size of lexicon, composition of lexicon, proportion of different word classes in lexicon (e.g. noun vs. verb), lexical diversity (type-token ratio)
WH Questions
WH questions
Word Learning with Attentional Cues mapping from form to meaning using attentional cues such as gaze, gesture, joint attention, labelling, pointing, sensitivity to speaker knowledge
Word Learning with Conceptual Cues mapping from form to meaning using conceptual and semantic cues such as animacy, categorization, constraints (e.g. mutual exclusivity, shape bias, whole object, taxonomic), imageability, individuation, referent familiarity
Word Learning with Perceptual Cues mapping from form to meaning using perceptual and phonetic cues such as acoustic cues, affect, perceptual sensitivity, phonetic contrast, pitch, pronunciation accuracy, segmentation, speech rate, transitional probabilities
Word Learning with Syntactic Cues mapping from form to meaning using syntactic and morphological cues such as sentence frames, syntactic bootstrapping, verbal/nominal inflection