• Taylor Mendoza

    Associate Editor, BU Today & Bostonia

    Taylor Mendoza is a BU Today and Bostonia associate editor. She graduated from BU in 2018 with a BA in English and a minor in cinema and media studies. At BU, she wrote for The Daily Free Press and was treasurer of the Creative Writing Club. She worked as a marketing content intern for JumpStart Games and as a social media and marketing associate at Nimble, Inc. She also makes videos about books on YouTube and was recently named a Penguin Teen Influencer. When she’s not reading, she can be found writing, listening to podcasts, watching movies, or playing board games. Profile

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There are 4 comments on Books for Hispanic Heritage Month

  1. Many thanks for these recommendations!

    Readers should be made aware that “Latinx” is not a term widely used by the Spanish-speaking (or Portuguese-speaking) inhabitants of the United States. It is not used anywhere in the Spanish-speaking world outside of the United States. No Colombian or Argentine or Salvadoran would refer to her/himself as “Latinx.” If one is speaking Spanish, the term sounds awkward at best (“Latin-equis”). The impulse behind the adoption of the term (largely in university or university-educated communities) is laudable but also potentially counter-productive when trying to mobilize the Spanish-speaking population of the US with regard to politically and socially progressive movements. (To be consistent, we would have to start saying “white-x”, “black-x”, “Asian-x”, etc. )

    The following study of the Pew Research Center is very useful for understanding the dynamics in question:

    https://www.pewresearch.org/hispanic/2020/08/11/about-one-in-four-u-s-hispanics-have-heard-of-latinx-but-just-3-use-it/

  2. Ah, the perennial, mansplainy comment about the use of Latinx:

    “The impulse behind the adoption of the term (largely in university or university-educated communities) is laudable but also potentially counter-productive when trying to mobilize the Spanish-speaking population of the US with regard to politically and socially progressive movements.”

    In the interest of context, maybe Iffland doesn’t understand that this list is published in *BU Today,* a news site for people affiliated with a major US research university, for which use of “Latinx” is entirely appropriate…

    1. Thank you, Peguin, for your comment.

      Yes, I realize that “BU Today” is a “news site for people affiliated with a major US research university.” (I’m deep into my fifth decade working at BU as a professor of Spanish and as a faculty member of its Center for Latin American Studies.) My concern focuses on the frequent inability of individuals associated with higher education to leave the bubble in which they carry out their activities. “Latinx” may have great traction on the campuses of BU, BC, Northeastern, Harvard, MIT, etc., but try it out in East Boston, Chelsea, Lawrence, etc. and you’ll probably get a blank look, at best. The growing Hispanic/Latino population in the US will play a major role in its political future. Being able to interact effectively with that population to influence its political direction is crucial for progressive political and social movements. The use of “Latinx” outside the bubble of higher education does not help in that effort. Indeed, it is frequently counterproductive.

  3. I’m sick and tired of people using Latinex to describe me and my culture. The word, if we can even call it that, is made up and meaningless. Just stop it already!

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