Courses

  • CGS HU 101: Traditions in the Humanities (The Ancient World Through the Enlightenment)
    Organized historically and devoted to the study of fiction, drama, poetry, art, and film. The semester begins with a unit on ways of interpreting the humanities, proceeds with the study of literature and art from Ancient Greece through the seventeenth century, and includes a film studies component. One lecture, two discussions, and additional film hours as assigned. This course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Aesthetic Exploration, Historical Consciousness, Critical Thinking.
    • Aesthetic Exploration
    • Historical Consciousness
    • Critical Thinking
  • CGS HU 102: Breaks with Tradition (The Enlightenment to the Present)
    Examines the departure from tradition characteristic of the modern in all the arts. Units of study include poetry, modern art, modern drama, and the novel. Particular themes may be stressed, such as, for example, the recurrence in modern culture of the antihero, formal experiment in the arts, or literature as the embodiment of values. Students also analyze five films by distinguished contemporary directors. One lecture, two discussions, and additional film hours as assigned. This course fulfills a single unit in the following BU Hub area(s): Aesthetic Exploration, Historical Consciousness, Critical Thinking.
    • Aesthetic Exploration
    • Historical Consciousness
    • Critical Thinking
  • CGS HU 103: Literature and Art from the Ancient World to the Enlightenment
    The course examines key figures and works in literary and artistic traditions from the ancient and classical periods through the Renaissance, concluding with a focus on the Enlightenment and Romanticism. The semester's units concentrate on how the works reflect cultural ideals and developments and on how they represent evolving aesthetic standards that have shaped conventions in literature and the arts. Coursework and assignments include learning trips to various sites of historical and cultural significance in the Boston area to emphasize the Humanities' relevance beyond the classroom. This course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Aesthetic Exploration, Historical Consciousness, Critical Thinking.
    • Aesthetic Exploration
    • Historical Consciousness
    • Critical Thinking
  • CGS HU 104: Literature and Art from the Industrial Revolution to the Digital Revolution
    This course is an interdisciplinary approach to literature and art history, and moves classroom, students, and the faculty overseas to London for the term. The course focuses on the 19th and 20th centuries and concludes with the technologically complex 21st century. Assignments encourage research skills, critical thinking, and contextual awareness. Trips to historically and culturally important sites enhance the course's experiential component and augment the humanities' interdisciplinary significance. This course fulfills a single unit in the following BU Hub area(s): Aesthetic Exploration, Historical Consciousness, Critical Thinking.
    • Aesthetic Exploration
    • Historical Consciousness
    • Critical Thinking
  • CGS HU 201: History of Ethical Philosophy -- From the Ancient World to the 19th Century
    A rigorous course in the history of ethical thought from the ancient world through the nineteenth century. The course also includes selected films and literary works that embody philosophical ideas and ethical dilemmas. Primary texts are used throughout. This course fulfills a single unit in the following BU Hub area(s): Philosophical Inquiry and Life's Meanings, Ethical Reasoning, Critical Thinking.
    • Philosophical Inquiry and Life's Meanings
    • Ethical Reasoning
    • Critical Thinking
  • CGS HU 202: History of 20th-Century Ethical Philosophy and Applied Ethics
    The course focuses on the application of philosophical ideas to various areas of modern life, such as politics, science, business, personal development, education, and religious faith. This course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Philosophical Inquiry and Life's Meanings, Ethical Reasoning, Creativity/Innovation.
    • Philosophical Inquiry and Life's Meanings
    • Ethical Reasoning
    • Creativity/Innovation
  • CGS HU 251: The Irish Outlaw: The Makings of a Nationalist Icon
    This course will examine the outlaw as he appears in the literature, culture and history of Ireland. As a symbolic figure in Irish folklore and literature, the outlaw is seen as a hero through whom the Irish people have historically imagined their dignity in the midst of perceived political subjugation and social injustice. Students will be exposed to a variety of texts and genres and will be expected to ask rigorous questions about the style and categorization of these texts, the different portrayals of "the outlaw" that appear, and the importance of such texts in literary and cultural history.
  • CGS HU 300: The Irish in Boston
    Focuses on the literature, politics, and culture of Irish Bostonians in the 19th and 20th century. Through the study of poetry, drama, fiction, politics, and music, the course explores the varieties of "Irishness" in Boston. Students will hone their literary and analytical skills through a close reading and interpretation of texts and will ask rigorous questions about the style and categorization of these texts, the different portrayals of "Irishness" that appear, and the importance of such texts in literary and cultural history. An interdisciplinary, team taught course. This course fulfills a single unit in the following BU Hub area(s): Aesthetic Exploration, Individual in Community, Critical Thinking.
    • Aesthetic Exploration
    • The Individual in Community
    • Critical Thinking
  • CGS HU 425: Trauma in History, Art & Religion
    Today trauma haunts soldiers returning from Iraq and Afghanistan. It afflicts the survivors of 9/11 and witnesses to the Boston Marathon bombings. It colors the lives of victims in the rape epidemic still unfolding on college campuses. It shapes the way we talk about race after the deaths of Michael Brown, etc. It is a lens through which we look at genocides past and present. And it provides new ways to read literature, view art, and watch television and film. This course is a co-taught, interdisciplinary seminar that explores the many ways ways that psychological trauma manifests itself. This course fulfills a single unit in the following BU Hub areas: Aesthetic Exploration, Social Inquiry II.
    • Aesthetic Exploration
    • Social Inquiry II
    • Life Skills
  • CGS HU 500: The History, Literature, Film, and Science of Baseball: An Interdisciplinary Course
    This interdisciplinary research seminar examines the history, culture, and science of the game from its shadowy origins in the early days of the nineteenth century, explosive growth in popularity during the Jazz Age, to the controversy-ridden Steroid Era. What impact did race and gender and class have on the evolution of the game? What are the physics of throwing a curve ball? How do bio-metrics explain the actual physical action of hitting a baseball? What are the links to myth and memory to popular perceptions of the game. This course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Aesthetic Exploration, Historical Consciousness, Research and Information Literacy.
    • Aesthetic Exploration
    • Historical Consciousness
    • Research and Information Literacy
  • CGS IN 300: Cultural Constructions of Motherhood
    This course examines the ways that motherhood--the roles, expectations, and assumptions that shape what counts as both "good" and "bad" mothering--is currently understood. Three key questions will drive our exploration: How does culture shape mothering practices? How do mothering practices shape culture? How do race, economic class, educational attainment, and sexual orientation impact how motherhood is constructed? Discussions of related topics such as fathering, maternal body image, celebrity profiles, mother blame, parenting roles, and the economic costs of motherhood will be explored. This course fulfills a single unit in the following BU Hub area(s): Social Inquiry I, Individual in Community, Critical Thinking.
    • Social Inquiry I
    • The Individual in Community
    • Critical Thinking
  • CGS IN 306: Shakespeare's Ethics
    What can great literature teach us about the ethical life? Can the arts teach sympathy or empathy for the unfamiliar? Can stepping into the shoes of a character from dramatic literature help us both deepen our sense of what it means to be human and how to lead a good life (be a morally upstanding citizen)? In what ways can art model ethical performance? This course will explore five of Shakespeare's plays with an emphasis on discovering and analyzing Shakespeare's ethical ideas. We will assess the thinking of philosophers who influenced Shakespeare. This course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Aesthetic Exploration, Philosophical Inquiry and Life's Meanings, Creativity/Innovation.
    • Philosophical Inquiry and Life's Meanings
    • Aesthetic Exploration
    • Creativity/Innovation
  • CGS MA 113: Elementary Statistics
    MA 113 may not be taken for credit by any student who has completed any MA course numbered 300 or higher. Students may receive credit for not more than one of the following courses: CAS MA 113, MA 115, or MA 213. Basic concepts of estimation and tests of hypotheses, ideas from probability; one-, two-, and multiple-sample problems. Applications in social sciences. Primarily for students in the social sciences who require a one-semester introduction to statistics; others should consider CAS MA 115 or MA 213. Carries MCS divisional credit in CAS. This course fulfills a single unit in the following BU Hub area: Quantitative Reasoning I.
    • Quantitative Reasoning II
  • CGS MA 121: Calculus
    For students who need an introductory calculus course for their major. Fulfills the CAS and Questroom mathematics requirement. This course covers differentiation and integration of functions of one variable and emphasizes application over mathematical generality. Applications in the natural sciences, social sciences, and management. This course fulfills a single unit in the following BU Hub area: Quantitative Reasoning II.
    • Quantitative Reasoning II
  • CGS NS 201: Biology I
    Focuses on the major paradigms (and shifts) including the origin of life, molecular and cellular theories of life, human origins, genetics, evolutionary theory and biodiversity. Encourages use of quantitative and scientific tools required to explore scientific models and connects the scientific process with ethical and social concerns arising from our understanding of the origin, evolution and diversity of life including our own species. This course fulfills a single unit in the following BU Hub area(s): Scientific Inquiry I, Quantitative Reasoning I, Critical Thinking.
    • Scientific Inquiry I
    • Quantitative Reasoning I
    • Critical Thinking
  • CGS NS 202: Human Ecology/Global Ecology
    What is the fate of the biosphere and our species? Can humans reconcile economic and technological growth with ecological sustainability? This course examines the impact of one species, Homo sapiens, on the ecosystems of the biosphere, seeking answers to these broad questions. This course fulfills a single unit in the following BU Hub area(s): Scientific Inquiry II, Teamwork/Collaboration.
    • Scientific Inquiry II
    • Teamwork/Collaboration
  • CGS NS 203: Astronomy
    The planets and their motions are presented from an historical perspective. The birth, life, and death of stars, the Milky Way and other galaxies are discussed. Big Bang cosmology is introduced.
  • CGS NS 250: The Set Table: Exploring The World of Food
    This course will explore the world of food in an interdisciplinary approach with a global perspective. Discussion will include the biology, culture, history, philosophy, and evolution of food, connecting the everyday world of food with its intellectual foundations.
  • CGS RH 101: English Composition: Argument and Critical Thinking
    Students learn the conventions of the expository essay and how to meet its demands by developing a thesis, organizing an argument, and supporting claims with reasoning and evidence. Students also receive instruction in thinking strategies, grammar, style, oral communication, and document design. Through class discussion of non-fiction essays and by working on assignments, students explore connections between readings assigned in Rhetoric and their readings in other courses. One lecture, two discussions, additional hours with the professor focused on individual writing instruction. This course fulfills a single unit in the following BU Hub area(s): First-Year Writing Seminar, Oral and/or Signed Communication, Critical Thinking.
    • First-Year Writing Seminar
    • Oral and/or Signed Communication
    • Critical Thinking
  • CGS RH 102: English Composition and Research
    Focuses on research while further developing students' expository writing skills. Students learn how to use electronic and traditional research tools, how to select and weigh evidence and integrate sources into an argument, how to use standard scholarly conventions to document their research, and how to integrate digital/multimedia expression. One lecture, two discussions, additional hours with the professor focused on individual writing instruction. This course fulfills a single unit in the following BU Hub area(s): Digital/Multimedia Expression, Writing, Research, and Inquiry, Research and Information Literacy.
    • Writing, Research, and Inquiry
    • Digital/Multimedia Expression
    • Research and Information Literacy