News

Seeking better understanding of breast cancer in African American women

Why do African American women die at higher rates from breast cancer and experience more aggressive breast tumors than white women?

School of Public Health researchers affiliated with the Slone Epidemiology Center (SEC) have received funding from the National Cancer Institute (NCI) to explore this question. The new grant is based on the premise that having a better understanding of the biology of breast cancer in African American women will lead to better prevention and treatment.

Read more at BU School of Public Health

BU researcher awarded grant to better understand breast cancer

Why do African-American women die at a higher rate and experience more aggressive breast tumors than white women? Researchers from Boston University's Slone Epidemiology Center (SEC) have received funding from the National Cancer Institute (NCI) to explore this question. The new grant is based on the premise that having a better understanding of the biology of breast cancer in African-American women will lead to better prevention and treatment.

Read more at EurekAlert!

Yvette Cozier named Assistant Dean for Diversity and Inclusion at Boston University School of Public Health

July 13th, 2015

Professor Cozier is currently an assistant professor in the Department of Epidemiology and an epidemiologist at the Slone Epidemiology Center at Boston University. Her extraordinary record of service around this topic within BU, her research interests, and her ability to build and foster multidisciplinary collaborations make Professor Cozier uniquely well suited for this position.

Read more at BU School of Public Health

Birth weight and diabetes

September 3rd, 2014in Black Women's Health Study News

African-Americans born at low birth weight are at an increased risk for Type 2 diabetes later in life, a new study has found.

Researchers at Boston University School of Public Health followed more than 21,000 women ages 21 to 69 who were enrolled in a large study of African-American women’s health for 16 years. Some 2,388 of them developed Type 2 diabetes.

Read more at The New York Times

Increased risk of birth defects from opioid use

Although potential risks to a developing fetus remain largely unknown, doctors are prescribing opioid painkillers to pregnant women in startling numbers. A recent study published in the journal Obstetrics & Gynecology shows a staggering 23 percent of 1.1 million pregnant women enrolled in Medicaid nationally filled an opioid, or narcotic, prescription in 2007—up from 18.5 percent in 2000. That is the largest usage rate of opioid prescriptions among pregnant women to date.

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