• Giana Carrozza

    Giana Carrozza Profile

  • Katherine Gianni

    Katherine Gianni is a public relations and social media administrator with BU Marketing & Communications; she can be reached at kgianni@bu.edu. Profile

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There are 13 comments on Firing Up the Grill? Why It’s So Hard to Give Up Meat

  1. I’ve referred to myself as a ‘low meat eater.’ This term seems less awkward than reducetarian. Michael Pollan [Omnivore’s Dilemma] has recommended using meat as flavoring, not the main dish. Pollan’s low meat eating advice was motivated by both health considerations and his visits to factor farms, similar to what Prof. Kumar has written.

    I’ve urged my children to take “mixed bites” where a bite of meat and bite of veggies are on the same fork. (Try this — it really helps shift you towards eating more veggies.). Going to restaurant — I end up eating all the veggies with a piece of fish or steak, taking the meat home, adding my own veggies, and getting a couple more meals out of it.

    I appreciate Kumar’s point that people will benefit when they are in a community of others with the same social norms of low meat eating.

    Regarding tasty recipes — I dare anyone to try Walnut Grill’s Gobi Manchurian and not be blown away by the flavor. https://www.facebook.com/watch/?v=1856169264435253 https://www.kannammacooks.com/baked-gobi-manchurian/

  2. Plant-based diet relies destroys soil life and relies on tons of pesticides, herbicides, and artificial fertilizers. For some crops, it takes a more energy in the form of fossil fuels than the energy that the plats capture from the sun. Even with all the inputs, growing plants continues to deplete our soils. This is an ecological dead end. Add to this the enormous costs of transportation (in and out of season) of “fresh” veggies and the lost of the nutrients along the way.

    Economically, plant-based ag employs low wage workers who are showered with chemicals, the farm owners do a bit better, but most of the profit goes to about 10 corporations that control all the processed food and grocery stores. Bezos and Gates are top farmland owners. These companies have the resources to lobby the government, medical schools, and media.

    Growing grass-fed beef is the exact opposite of plant agriculture: It improves the soils, supports local farmers, and provides the most nutrient dense food on the planet. Anyone interested in nutrition can compare an ounce of liver to any veggie. cronometer is a nice database, but there are others.

    1. Which specific crops take more energy to harvest?

      The carbon footprint of food transportation is a lot lower than you think, compared to what (or who) you eat. All slaughterhouses are local to somewhere. Check out Our World in Data for more information https://ourworldindata.org/food-choice-vs-eating-local

      Maybe you think that grass fed beef improves the soil, but there is not enough space that it is sustainable for the whole world. Animals need a lot more space than you think. Land use change (aka clearing forests) creates a lot of emissions as well

    2. Beef is a known carcinogen and contributes to animal suffering, climate devastation, health issues, zoonotic diseases – and if you think slaughtering a cow, who is crying for mercy, does not have psychological affects on the workers (also not paid well) – then you are well brain-washed EK by the propaganda of Animal AG. Also keep in mind normalizing violence like this does have an impact on how we interact with one another, what we consider acceptable, and obviously promotes speciesism. Don’t forget this type of farming was introduced by colonialism. Got to look at the whole picture EK, not just what’s convenient or safe for you.

      The issues you mention about pesticides etc… is a human problem. It is not nature

      1. Beef is not a known carcinogen. Red meat is extremely nutritious and was foundational in human evolution. You have simply been misled. Not the vegetables are bad per se, but one cannot consume enough calories from just vegetables. That’s why vegans eat a lot of nuts and seed oils, the latter is extremely damaging to the cardiovascular system. So eat meat to be healthy, but it’s best to choose sources that treat the animals with kindness.

  3. It’s hard to give up meat because humans are designed to eat an animal based diet. Meat, especially red meat, is extremely nutritious. There is no possible way for human ancestors to have survived on plants, which were mainly eaten to accompany the meat at mealtime. Vegans basically consume plants with loads of nuts and processed seed oils. These seed oils are extremely unhealthy too.

    1. How much meat do other primates/hominids eat? Look it up. And the fact that vegetarians and vegans can and do survive on plant-based diets makes it pretty obvious that all you’re offering here is pseudoscience.

  4. People who consume meat or other animal products also consume plant-based food, but vegans won’t have any meat. It’s unfair to let them argue in equal field, because vegans have no room for retreat, they will win at the end.
    I hope this happens after my death.

  5. 30 years ago my favorite meal was a rare thick steak and baked potato with sour cream and butter. The result was that I almost had a heart attack causing me to become a low fat vegetarian. Prior to this time I was not a tree hugger, but not wanting to hear those words again cause me to adjust my food choices and that is to me the best reason for anybody to give up meat.

    When I made the switch away from me, because I anticipated that I would miss having an occasional steak, I decided that once each month I would indulge. But once I change my diet, I soon recognized that as the months went by I no longer had the desire to eat meat.

    Until you are exposed to the interesting flavors that a vegetarian diet has in store for you, you live with the myth that food will be boring by giving up meat. Far from it.

    When I combined my vegetarian diet with daily exercise consisting of walking, not speed walking, the end product of my way of life was that I went from 182 pounds to 157 pounds and felt very healthy.

    After 20 years, to diversify my diet, I added fish and became a pescatarian. Today I am very careful to maintain a low fat diet and continue to watch what I eat. But the mainstay of my diet tends to be vegetarian meals.

  6. My wife and I stopped eating meat about 100 days ago. In the first two weeks, my stomach was noticeably more comfortable. In the first 30 days, my body just felt different – in a much better way. We sleep better at night and I’m more energized during the day now.

    Due to some recent work projects, I’ve not been able to maintain a highly active fitness routine. In previous times when I’ve been in non-active mode, I quickly gain 5 – 10 lbs. Since not eating meat, my weight has stabilized and I feel less pressure to complete my daily 60-90 minutes of exercise.

    I would encourage anyone to experiment about going meat-free for a few weeks and see how this modified diet feels.

  7. I’m not giving up meat. Bill Gates can suck bugs for all I care. Meat is good for you. It contains dietary fat and protein. I plan to live a long time, despite all the wealthy tree nuts who don’t want me to. Not giving up meat .

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