Courses

  • KHC NE 102: Reading, Language, and the Brain
    This course explores the scientific study of reading and language development--a richly multidisciplinary effort that bridges psychology, linguistics, neuroscience, and education--emphasizing the modern scientific effort to understand "the reading brain", the coordination of neural systems for vision, hearing, language, and memory. Specific topics include the history of writing, how different writing systems produce different reading brains, how brain injuries can result in specific impairments in language and reading, and how brain imaging is helping unravel the mystery of reading impairment. This course fulfills a single unit in the following BU Hub area(s): Scientific Inquiry I, Social Inquiry I, Critical Thinking.
    • Scientific Inquiry I
    • Social Inquiry I
    • Critical Thinking
  • KHC PH 104: Planning to Fix Health Problems
    U.S. health care suffers anarchy because market competition and competent government action fail. Costs rise. Coverage and quality fall. You'll learn to prepare a plan to ameliorate a health problem by analyzing both its real causes and the efficacy/cost/political feasibility of possible remedies. This course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Social Inquiry I, Quantitative Reasoning I.
    • Social Inquiry I
    • Quantitative Reasoning I
  • KHC PO 102: How to Change the World
    Explores how everyday people shape global politics, drawing on classic studies of political anthropology as well as more recent examples of transnational and digital activism. This course fulfills a single unit in the following BU Hub area(s): Historical Consciousness, Oral and/or Signed Communication, Research and Information Literacy.
    • Historical Consciousness
    • Oral and/or Signed Communication
    • Research and Information Literacy
  • KHC RH 101: Serious Comics: Graphic Narrative and the Representation of History
    This course explores the use of nonfiction comics (also known as graphic narrative) to represent catastrophic history. Assigned texts include book- length works that use the comics form to depict the Holocaust, the Islamic Revolution, Hiroshima, the Bosnian War, the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, Hurricane Katrina, the AIDS epidemic, and 9/11. Throughout, we will consider the impact of the comics form on our understanding of devastating history. This course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Aesthetic Exploration, Oral and/or Signed Communication, Creativity/Innovation.
    • Aesthetic Exploration
    • Oral and/or Signed Communication
    • Creativity/Innovation
  • KHC RH 102: A Nation Riven: Turbulence and Transformation in 1960s America and Today
    What can the social and political ferment of the Sixties teach us about the issues of the present day? Do the ideals of 1960s radicals still ring true? Why did the passage of the Civil Rights Act in 1965 lead to racial unrest rather than reconciliation, and how does this history resonate in the rhetoric of Black Lives Matter? Why did foundational American beliefs like Free Speech place idealists at odds with mainstream American society, and what lessons does the campus free speech movement of the 1960s have for student activists today? This course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Historical Consciousness, The Individual in Community, Critical Thinking.
    • Historical Consciousness
    • The Individual in Community
    • Critical Thinking
  • KHC RN 103: Islam in the Eyes of the West
    An introduction to how and why Islam came to be viewed as a static, essentialized tradition opposed to the West. Covers Orientalist and neo- Orientalist debates about Islam and provides a historical survey of the texts, practices, and beliefs of the Islamic tradition, from the 7th century to the present, in the Middle East, South Asia, North Africa, and the U.S. through a study of the Quran, poetry, philosophy, and political treatises. This course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Historical Consciousness, Global Citizenship and Intercultural Literacy.
    • Historical Consciousness
    • Global Citizenship and Intercultural Literacy
  • KHC SM 102: Reforming the U.S. Health Care System
    In this seminar, students explore the U.S. health care system and those of six other nations, analyzing policy challenges through team projects that evaluate evidence-based reform strategies, and take into account economic, social, political, managerial, ethical, legal, and regulatory factors. This course fulfills a single unit in the following BU Hub area(s): Social Inquiry II, Global Citizenship and Intercultural Literacy, Research and Information Literacy.
    • Global Citizenship and Intercultural Literacy
    • Social Inquiry II
    • Research and Information Literacy
  • KHC ST 111: Studio I
    In Studio I, Kilachand students hone their writing, critical reading and thinking, and analytical skills. Students explore fundamental ethical, aesthetic, and social concerns posed by challenging texts and events. They compose their own writing, with attention to the modes and genres of expression, media, and evidence appropriate to the goals of the piece and its designated audience. Students revise their writing with significant individual attention in conferences with their instructors. Students register for one section of Studio I in fall semester of their first year. This course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: First-Year Writing Seminar.
    • First-Year Writing Seminar
  • KHC ST 112: Studio II
    In Studio 2, Kilachand students hone their writing, critical reading and thinking, and research skills. Students learn the fundamental techniques of academic research, develop their own research projects, and write and revise a research paper. This project is developed in stages throughout the semester with significant individual attention in conferences with Studio instructors. Students register for one section of Studio II in spring semester of their first year. This course fulfills a single unit in the following BU Hub area: Writing: Research & Inquiry.
    • Writing, Research, and Inquiry
  • KHC UC 105: "Liberty, Fanaticism (Religious and Secular), and Civic Unity?
    Does a free community require shared values? Furthermore, must political liberty be sustained by a communal religious outlook--and if so, which one? If multiple religious views are permitted in a free society, how is a regime of mutual toleration to be established and how is religious liberty to be defined? Is the cause of civic virtue and liberty better served by a sort of free market of religions rather than a state-enforced civic religion? And finally, how can rival religious and secular claims about the foundations of political authority be negotiated in a free community? This course fulfills a single unit in the following BU Hub area(s): Philosophical Inquiry and Life's Meanings, Ethical Reasoning, Critical Thinking.
    • Philosophical Inquiry and Life's Meanings
    • Ethical Reasoning
    • Critical Thinking
  • KHC UC 106: Biomedical Enhancement and the Future of Human Nature
    Biomedical technologies are increasingly being used to enhance the biological, cognitive, and psychological capacities of otherwise healthy human beings. Although the enhancement enterprise aims to increase levels of human wellbeing, it also raises a host of ethical concerns, such as worries that it will exacerbate inequality, undermine authenticity, devalue diversity, or even pose an existential threat to the human species. This course will survey the ethics of biomedical enhancements carried out through the administration of drugs, genetic modifications, and human-machine interfaces. This course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Philosophical Inquiry and Life's Meanings, Ethical Reasoning, Critical Thinking.
    • Philosophical Inquiry and Life's Meanings
    • Ethical Reasoning
    • Critical Thinking
  • KHC XL 101: Global Shakespeares: Text, Culture, Appropriation
    Why do contemporary writers parrot and parody "Shakespeare," and how much of this activity is about Shakespeare at all? This seminar provides an introduction to reading and writing about Shakespeare's plays. But it also takes a step back to consider Shakespeare as a phenomenon. Among others we'll look at feminist Shakespeare, postcolonial and nationalist Shakespeare, and sci-fi Shakespeare. Beyond learning about particular offshoots and adaptations, the deeper point is to make sure you never read a "Great Book" the same way again. This course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Aesthetic Exploration, Global Citizenship and Intercultural Literacy, Creativity/Innovation.
    • Aesthetic Exploration
    • Global Citizenship and Intercultural Literacy
    • Creativity/Innovation