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There are 12 comments on To Do Today: Take a Trip to the Beach via MBTA

      1. I grew up there on the wrong side of the tracks. If you (correctly) consider Smith’s Point and the beach area the right side of the tracks, the majority of the town is on the wrong side, geographically and socially. My friend used to deliver newspapers to the long driveway set for pennies, and my mother was a low payed personal secretary to one of MbtS’s “finer” citizens.

        I’m sure you have entertaining personal stories to back up your claim (and I’d actually like to hear them for fun), but as a former resident I have none from my youth playing video games at the sub shop, and certainly none from the beach, which is mostly filled with friendly out-of-towners.

        I’m not saying there aren’t snooty people in town, but if you encounter them in the .6 mi. between the train and the beach, you’re trying too hard.

  1. Winthrop and Yirrell Beaches are accessible by the Paul Revere 712 and 713 buses that leave from Wood Island on the Blue Line. 10 minutes from the station.

  2. MBTA runs ferry service (weekday and weekend) from Long Wharf in Boston to Hull. It is about a 10 minute bike ride from the ferry drop off point to Nantasket beach. Great day trip!

  3. What makes beaches MUCH more accessible by the T is that you can take your bike with you on the commuter rail lines. Why walk 2.5 miles to Nantasket Beach when you can carry a bunch of stuff on a bike rack, and bike there in less than 15 minutes. Or bicycle to Cohasset beaches. or Scituate. Same on the North Shore.

    However, it was very discouraging a year or two ago when they discontinued weekend service on the GreenBush line. They say it was due to lack of ridership, and perhaps it was, but . . . . . that was for a couple of years (after two decades of clamoring) a GREAT way to get to the beach – bring your bike on the GreenBush train on the weekend, and go to Scituate, or even all the way to Plymouth.

  4. Singing Beaching, Manchester-By-The-Sea. The beach has a $5 walk-on fee during the summer season. Note to drivers: the small parking lot often fills early in the day, especially on weekends. what they are really saying is: we do not like out-of-town’ers.

    1. No – the parking lot fills early because it is small and many people want to visit. The walk-on fee is typical for popular north shore beaches, such as Crane’s Beach. I’ve been to Singing Beach many, many times over the years and have never encountered unfriendly attitudes either at the beach or in town.

  5. This article should be updated to reflect the major commuter rail construction on the Newburyport/Rockport line this summer – there will be NO rail service at all on weekends from July 8th through September, and will only have rail service from North Station to Salem on weekdays from mid-July to mid-August – all other stops are being replaced with bus service (which will NOT follow the same time schedule as the rail schedules linked in this article). Anyone who thinks they can hop on a train at North Station and easily make it to the beaches at Ipswich, Manchester-By-The-Sea, or Rockport this summer is going to be in for a rude surprise.

  6. You can also take the CapeFlyer (www.capeflyer) with connections to Wareham, Buzzards Bay and Hyannis with ferry connections to Nantucket and Martha’s Vineyard. The train is a partnership between the T and the Cape Cod Regional Transit Authority. There is a bike coach and a cafe car. There is a special $15 round trip rate on Sundays.

  7. The MBTA commuter boat runs to Hull/Nantasket on the weekends. Take your bike on the boat or take the Hull-o-Trolley from Pemberton pier to the state beach.

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