Sarah Villard

Sarah Villard photo

EDUCATION

- PhD in Speech-Language Pathology, Boston University (in progress)

- MS in Speech-Language Pathology, Boston University (2012)

- MA in English: Language & Linguistics, University of New Hampshire (2009)

- BA in English, Binghamton University (2003)

RESEARCH INTERESTS

- The relationship between linguistic and cognitive processing

- Role of cognitive processes in aphasia rehabilitation

- Intra-individual variability in task performance in aphasia

PUBLICATIONS

Villard, S. & Kiran, S. (in press). Between-session intra-individual variability in sustained, selective, and integrational attention in aphasia. Neuropsychologia.

Kiran, S., Caplan, D., Sandberg, S., Levy, J., Berardino, A., Ascenso, E., Villard, S., & Tripodis, Y. (2012). Development of a theoretically based treatment for sentence comprehension deficits in individuals with aphasia. American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology.

CONFERENCE PRESENTATIONS/POSTERS

Villard, S. & Kiran, S. (2014). Clinical Aphasiology Conference, St. Simons Island, Georgia. Sarah Villard CAC 2014

Kiran, S., Caplan, D., Villard, S., Des Roches, C., Ascenso, E., & Waters, G. (2013). The nature of cross-task and cross-structure generalization following sentence comprehension treatment in aphasia. Society for the Neurobiology of Language. San Diego, California.

Villard, S. & Kiran, S. (2013). Consistency of Sustained and Selective Non-Linguistic Attention in Aphasia. Academy of Aphasia. Lucerne, Switzerland. Sarah Villard Academy of Aphasia Oct 2013

Effects of training sentence to picture matching and object manipulation to improve sentence comprehension in aphasia: Acquisition and generalization. Kiran S., Caplan D., Villard S., Ascenso E., Waters G. (Poster at Academy of Aphasia, 2012).

Villard, S. & Kiran, S. A comparison of two treatments for sentence comprehension deficits in aphasia. (Technical research presentation at the American Speech-Language-Hearing Convention, 2012)

Villard, S. (2009). Postvocalic /r/ in the Upper Valley of Vermont and New Hampshire. New Ways in Language Variation. Ottawa, Canada.

 

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