Fall 2013 Courses

This schedule is subject to change.  For the most accurate information concerning other programs and departments, consult the University Class Schedule online: www.bu.edu/studentlink, as well as each department’s own website.  Graduate students may not take courses below the 500 level for credit.

American Studies

CAS AM 501 – Special Topics in American Studies: Transnational American Studies. Drawing on examples from literature, history, art, photography, architecture, and material culture, this course explores the global origins of American culture. Topics will include the immigrant experience; the middle passage; transatlantic tourism; black internationalism; and cultural crossings between Japan and the United States in the late nineteenth century. Readings by and about Emerson, John  La Farge, Henry James, Kakuzo Okakura, Frank Lloyd Wright, Gertrude Stein, Langston Hughes, and others. Patterson, TR 11:00 – 12:30.

GRS AM 736 – Literature of American Studies. Introduction to classic problems in the interpretation of American society and culture. Required course for all first year American Studies Ph.D. students. Permission from instructor required for all non American Studies Ph.D. students. Halter, W 1:00 – 4:00. 

GRS AM 867 – Material Culture. Introduction to the theory and practice of the interdisciplinary study of material culture, which includes everything we make and use, from food and clothing to art and buildings. Explores contemporary scholarship from a range of disciplines. Also offered as GRS AH 867. Moore, M 2:00 – 5:00.

African American Studies

CAS AA 501 – Topics in African American Literature: Literature of the Early Black Atlantic. This course considers the first century of literature written in English by authors of African descent, including Phillis Wheatley, Olaudah Equiano, Mary Prince, and Frederick Douglass. How did these writers represent the early modern world? How did they work to change it? Also offered as CAS EN 579. Rezek, MWF 12:00 – 1:00.

CAS AA 507 – Literature of the Harlem Renaissance. A study of the major writers of the Harlem Renaissance. Explores how they proclaimed a renewal of racial consciousness and cultural pride, and how they challenged racial and cultural barriers in American society. Also offered as CAS EN 377. Boelcskevy, W 1:00 – 4:00.

CAS AA 514 – Labor, Sexuality and Resistance in the Afro-Atlantic World. The role of slavery in shaping the society and culture of the Afro-Atlantic world, highlighting the role of labor, the sexual economy of slave regimes, and the various strategies of resistance deployed by enslaved people. Also offered as CAS HI 584. Thorton, W 2:00 – 5:00.

CAS AA 590 – The World and the West. Explores relations between the West and the Third World from 1850, focusing on national and cultural movements in the Third World, and places the African American struggle for freedom in the United States in global and comparative perspective. Also offered as CAS HI 590. Richardson, T 1:00 – 4:00.

GRS AA 871 – African American History. The history of African Americans from African origins to present time; consideration of slavery, reconstruction, and ethnic relations from the colonial era to our own time. Heywood, TR 11:00 – 12:30.

GRS AA 888 – Black Radical Thought. Black radical thought in America, Europe, and Africa since the eighteenth century through writings of abolitionists, leaders of revolutions and liberation movements, Black nationalist, and Black socialists. Emphasizes the global nature of the “Black World” and its role in world history. Also offered as GRS HI 761. Blakely, TR 2:00 – 3:30.

English

CAS EN 579 – Topics in African American Literature: Literature of the Early Black Atlantic. This course considers the first century of literature written in English by authors of African descent, including Phillis Wheatley, Olaudah Equiano, Mary Prince, and Frederick Douglass. How did these writers represent the early modern world? How did they work to change it? Also offered as CAS AA 501. Rezek, MWF 12:00 – 1:00.

History

CAS HI 584 – Labor, Sexuality and Resistance in the Afro-Atlantic World. The role of slavery in shaping the society and culture of the Afro-Atlantic world, highlighting the role of labor, the sexual economy of slave regimes, and the various strategies of resistance deployed by enslaved people. Also offered as CAS AA 514. Thornton, W 2:00  - 5:00.

CAS HI 590 – The World and the West. Explores relations between the West and the Third World from 1850, focusing on national and cultural movements in the Third World, and places the African American struggle for freedom in the United States in global and comparative perspective. Also offered as CAS AA 590. Richardson, T 1:00 – 4:00.

GRS HI 761 – Black Radical Thought. Black radical thought in America, Europe, and African since the eighteenth century through writings of abolitionist, leaders of revolutions and liberation movements, Black nationalists, and Black socialists. Emphasizes the global nature of the “Black World” and it’s role in world history. Also offered as GRS AA 888. Blakely, TR 2:00 – 3:30.

History of Art & Architecture

CAS AH 520 – The Museum and Historical Agency. Using Boston’s excellent examples, we will consider history, present realities and future possibilities of museums and historical agencies. Issues and debates confronting museums today examined in the light of historical development and changing communities. Emphasis on collecting, display and interpretation, as well as on interactions between artists, dealers, collectors, donors, scholars, trustees and museum professionals. Opportunities to pursue projects in museums and historical agencies in and around Boston. Internship experience an advantage. Hall, R 2:00 – 5:00.

CAS AH 584 – Greater Boston: Architecture and Planning. Examines the buildings, development patterns, and open space planning of greater Boston, with particular emphasis on the Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries. Weekly visits to neighborhoods and buildings throughout the city are combined with independent research projects for each member of the seminar. Morgan, W 2:00 – 5:00.

GRS AH 786 – Colloquium on Twentieth Century American Painting. This colloquium, which accompanies the lecture course for CAS AH 386, focuses on critical and theoretical readings that relate to twentieth-century American painting, photography, sculpture, installation and performance art, and criticism. Hills, T 2:00 – 4:00.

GRS AH 798 – Colloquium in Twentieth Century Architecture. In conjunction with the CAS AH 398 lecture course, this colloquium focuses on main figures, events, artifacts of twentieth-century architectural history. Scrivano, T 10:00 – 12:00.

GRS AH 891 – Seminar: Documentary Photography 1839 – present. This seminar will examine the photographic book throughout the years from 1839 to the present. We will concentrate on the book as a uniques form for the medium, and study image/text relationships, narrative structures, cultural constructions of the book’s message, the serial quality of grouped images, and the differences and similarities between literary and photographic languages. Photographic books can be roughly divided into three categories: photographic albums or original photographs; books created by a photographer or larger agency with a social agenda; and artists’ photographic books. We will study all three. Sichel, M 9:00 – 11:00.