Course Offerings

Women’s Studies courses that will be offered in Spring 2018:

        • WS 102 – Gender & Sexuality II: An Interdisciplinary Introduction
          A1: T/Th 9:30-10:45, Micallef
        • WS 213 – Sexism in the Twenty-First Century
          A1: M/W 12:20-1:35, Balser
        • WS 233 – The Evolutionary Biology of Human Variation
          A1: T/Th 11:00-12:15, Schmitt
        • WS 241 – Sociology of Gender
          A1: M/W/F 11:15-12:05
        • WS 297 – African American Women’s History
          A1: T/Th 2:00-3:15, Farmer
        • WS 300 – WGS Topics in Literature and the Humanities
          A1: Early Women Modern Authors, M/W/F 12:20-1:10, Martin
          B1: Thinking Sex with Tanizaki Junichiro, T/Th 9:30-10:45, Vincent
          C1: Gender and Religion in the Graphic Novel, T/Th 2:00-3:15, Herzog
        • WS 303 – WGS Topics in Film and Media
          A1: Jane Campion: A Girl’s Own Story, M/W 2:30-5:15, Swedberg
          B1: Gender and Globalization in the Middle East Through Film, T 2:30-6:15, Micallef
        • WS 305 – Topics in WGS
          A1: Queer Theory, T/Th 11:00-12:15, Liu
          B1: Sexuality, Race, and the Bible, M/W/F 9:05-9:55, Rey
          C1: Gender and Judaism, W 2:30-5:15, Herzog
        • WS 326 – Arts of Gender
          A1: T/Th 3:30-4:45, McDonough
        • WS 340 – Women, Race, and Gender in Mass Media
          A1: W 2:30-5:15, Gottfried
          B1: T/Th 3:30-4:45, Gottfried

        • WS 350 – Women and Politics
          A1: T 12:30-3:15, Balser

        • WS 352 – American Masculinities
          A1: T/Th 2:30-3:15, Gottfried

        • WS 450 – Internships: Women, Gender, and Social Change
          A1: W 2:30-5:15, Balser

        • WS 451 – Fashion as History
          A1: Th 12:30-3:15, Chernock

        • WS 454 – Sexuality and Religion in the U.S.
          A1: T/Th 2:00-3:15, Petro

    NOTE: Some courses from other disciplines may be taken for WGS minor credit.

    CAS WS 101 – Gender and Sexuality I: An Interdisciplinary Introduction
    Introduction to women’s, gender, and sexuality studies, integrating approaches from the natural and social sciences and humanities, focused on the origins, diversity, and expression of gendered and sexed individuals. Topics include the evolutionary origin of sexes; evolution, development, and social construction of sex differences; sexual differences, similarities, and diversity in bodies, brains, behavior, and artistic and intellectual expressions. Team-taught. Students who complete both halves of the two-semester sequence WS 101/102 receive divisional studies credit for two courses, from two different divisions: Natural Science (without lab), Social Science, and/or Humanities. Neither WS 101 nor WS 102 alone carries divisional studies credit.

    CAS WS 102 – Gender and Sexuality II: An Interdisciplinary Introduction
    Introduction to women’s, gender, and sexuality studies, focused on communities and institutions. Integrates approaches from the natural and social sciences and humanities, including evolutionary, historical, and cross-cultural analyses, feminist and queer theory. Topics include human reproductive biology; patriarchy and sexual violence; parenting, kinship structures, and forms of intimacy; sexual orientation; evolutionary medicine; and the relationship of academic research to social activism. Team-taught. Students who complete both halves of the two-semester sequence WS 101/102 receive divisional studies credit for two courses, from two different divisions: Natural Science (without lab), Social Science, and/or Humanities. Neither WS 101 nor WS 102 alone carries divisional studies credit.

    CAS WS 213 – Sexism in the Twenty-First Century
    Examines the dynamics of contemporary institutions as they affect women’s and men’s lives, particularly in the United States– the economy, politics, mass media and culture, the beautification industry, sex industries, and hook-up culture– through the intersections of race, class, ethnicity, and sexual identity. Carries social science divisional credit in CAS.

    CAS WS 214 – Creating Women
    Considers how gender shapes the creative work of women writers, artists, and musicians and how women’s artistic work contributes to understanding the social, cultural, and political history of women. Attention also to sexuality, race, ethnicity, class. Carries CAS Humanities divisional credit.

    CAS WS 233 – The Evolutionary Biology of Human Variation
    Addresses human biological variation. An introduction to the fundamentals of comparative biology, evolutionary theory, and genetics and considers how research in theses fields informs some of our most culturally-engaged identities: race, sex, gender, sexuality, and body type. Carries natural sciences divisional credit (without lab) in CAS. Also offered as CAS AN 233.

    CAS WS 241 – Sociology of Gender
    An introduction to the social construction of sex and gender with a focus on the economic, political, social, and cultural forces that shape gender relations. Examines gender as a social structure that patterns institutional inequalities and everyday interactions on society. Carries social sciences divisional credit in CAS. Also offered as CAS SO 241.

    CAS WS 297 – African American Women’s History
    Survey of African American women’s history from the slave trade to the present, investigating its critical role in shaping the meaning of race, gender, and sexuality during slavery, Jim Crow, and the civil rights era. Also offered as CAS AA 297 and CAS HI 297.

    CAS WS 300 – WGS Topics in Literature and the Humanities These topics are offered in Spring 2018. May be repeated for credit if topics are different.

      • Section A1: Early Modern Women Authors: A survey of European women writers from the 1400s to the early 1600s, and of the modern critical thinking that has redefined their literary-historical importance. Christine de Pizan, Teresa of Avila, Marguerite de Navarre, Gaspara Stampa Elizabeth I, and others. Also offered as CAS En 474 and CAS XL 381 A1.
      • Section B1: Thinking Sex with Tanizaki Jun’ichiro: Tanizaki Jun’ichiro’s novels invite readers to imagine other worlds beyond norms of gender, race, and sex. This course pairs Tanizaki’s masterpieces with key works of critical theory to explore the promise, and the limits of literary utopias. In English translation. Also offered as CAS LJ 451 A1.
      • Section C1: Gender and Religion in the Graphic Novel: Examines the aesthetics of comic art and the graphic novel as they emphasize gendered, religious, and cultural identities. Focus on Judaism and Islam, two storytelling traditions that use graphic novels to transport readers in time and space. Also offered as CAS RN 524 B1.

    CAS WS 303 – WGS Topics in Film and Media These topics are offered in Spring 2018. May be repeated for credit if topics are different.

      • Section A1: Jane Campion: A Girl’s Own Story: In-depth study of Jane Campion, whose prolific output has largely resisted any attempt to represent “the” woman’s voice — a pressure Campion has had to face due to being a rare female director working in a male-dominated industry. Also offered as CAS CI 340 A1.
      • Section B1: Gender and Globalization in the Middle East Through Film: Exploration of the intersection of gender, sexuality, and globalization in Middle Eastern films. Analysis and interrogation of films’ contributions to the construction of gender and sexual norms in the late 20th and early 21st centuries. Also offered as CAS CI 390 C1 and CAS XL 382 A1.

    CAS WS 305 – Topics in Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies. These topics are offered in Spring 2018. May be repeated for credit if topics are different.

      • Section A1: Queer Theory: Surveys major texts and arguments in queer theory from Butler’s Gender Trouble to contemporary discussions of cisnormativity, homonationalism, affect, pinkwashing, crip theory, and queer-of-color critique. Explores different uses of queer theory in legal debates, literary analysis, and cultural criticism. Also offered as CAS XL 470 E1.
      • Section B1: Sexuality, Race, and the Bible: The ways in which feminist, womanist, postcolonial, lesbian, queer, and trans communities interpret the Bible. Key themes explored throughout this course are intersectionality, feminist/gender criticism, and other hermeneutical challenges while addressing the Bible.
      • Section C1: Gender and Judaism: Explores the role of gender and sexuality in Judaism and Jewish experience, historically and in the present. Subjects include constructions of masculinity and femininity, attitudes toward (and uses of) the body and sexuality, textual traditions, and the gendered nature of religious practice and religious authority. Also offered as CAS RN 337 A1.

    CAS WS 326 – Arts of Gender
    Examines representations of gender and sexuality in diverse art forms, including drama, dance, film, and literature, and how art reflects historical constructions of gender.

    CAS WS 340 – Women, Race, and Gender in Mass Media
    Develops students’ media literacy through hands-on analysis of media and pop culture representations of women, femininity, and race; their relation to women’s lived experience; and the place of “feminine” values in contemporary culture.

    CAS WS 342 – Law and Gender in the United States
    Combines legal, historical, and sociological studies of women’s evolving legal status. Discussions cover constitutional law, family law (including same-sex marriage), reproductive rights/technologies, sex as crime–statutory rape, prostitution, sodomy–and how law shapes gender relations for men and women.

    CAS WS 344 – Images of Women in Popular Fiction Formulaic genres – fairy tales, romance fiction, detective novels, horror stories, and science fiction–offer a medium for tracing the development of representations of women. Course analyzes women’s roles and functions in these genres, focusing on novels by American authors.

    CAS WS 346 – Women & Film
    Study of principally American films, exploring how the medium has shaped and had been shaped by cultural perceptions of women. Reading provide background for interpretation of films ranging from screwball comedy to film noir, “women’s films,” and films by women directors. Also offered as CAS CI 373.

    CAS WS 350 – Women and Politics
    Readings, discussion, and field research on issues of women’s relationship to the processes of political influence, change, and empowerment. Analysis of public policy related to women and children. Also offered as CAS PO 309.

    CAS WS 352 – American Masculinities
    Considers the biological and social organization of masculinities; the ways culture reproduces/articulates masculinities, particularly with regard to race and class; how masculine identities are expressed; male privilege; alternative masculinities; and what is at stake in negotiating contemporary masculinities. Also offered as CAS SO 352.

    CAS WS 356 – Women and Comedy in America Considers how comedy is marked by gender and allows women to defy the expectations of femininity and transmute aggression into humor; what women find funny; and how women use the power of humor for survival, resistance, subversion, and truth-telling.

    CAS WS 360 – Global Feminism: Race and Gender in International Perspectives Exploration of critical issues concerning women, gender, and race throughout the world. Topics include women and the global economy, health care, reproduction, the dynamics of sexism, violence against women, international women’s movements and political/institutional change. Also offered as IR358.

    CAS WS 396 – Philosophy of Gender and Sexuality
    Analyzes notions of gender and sexuality. Questions include: Are gender and sexual identity natural, or are they social constructions? How are they related to love and desire? Also offered as CAS PH 256 and CAS PO 356.

    CAS WS 434 – Monarchy in Modern Britain A seminar probing seminal moments in the history of modern British sovereignty, when the politics of the court intersected with the politics of the people. Particular consieration is given to how monarchy has survived as an institution. Also offered as CAS HI 434.

    CAS WS 435 – Histories of Human Rights Traces Westerners’ development of a humanitarian sensibility in the eighteenth century and considers how this sensibility was deployed in struggles over the rights of various groups during the modern period. Emphasis on Anglo-American contributions. Also offered as CAS HI 435.

    CAS WS 450 – Internships: Women, Gender, and Social Change A seminar which introduces students to the practices/ideas of social change organization through local internships and weekly discussions related to class, race, sexuality, women and gender.
    Prerequisite: Junior or Senior standing; or two prior WGS electives; or consent of instructor.

    CAS WS 451 – Fashion as History This seminar treats clothing and other products of material culture as historical documents. Explores what clothing can tell us about key developments in the modern period relating to trade and commerce, empire, gender, class, industry, revolution, nation-building, identity politics, and globalization. Also offered as CAS HI 451.

    CAS WS 454 – Sexuality and Religion in the U.S. Religion and sexuality in the U.S., including theoretical and historical approaches to religious and sexual desire, identity, ritual, and regulation. Possible topics include religious and sexual freedom, plural marriage, the Sexual Revolution, reproductive justice, sex and secularism, and LGBTQ rights. Also offered as CAS RN 454.

    CAS WS 478 – Women on Trial Explores historic and contemporary trials of women like Rosa Parks, Angela Davis, Marissa Alexander in order to investigate how media shapes public and popular perceptions of race, class, gender, sexuality, and the law. Also offered as CAS HI 478.

    CAS WS 516 – Gender and Politics Analyzes the relationship between gender and politics, law and policy primarily in the United States. Considers inequalities based on gender and sexuality, women’s changing political, gender- and sexuality-based political action and social movements. Also offered as CAS PO 516.
    Prerequisite: Junior standing or above.

    CAS WS 594 – Historical Traditions of Feminist Theory Explore selected writing from the history of feminist theory, 18th century to the rise of the late-20th century feminist movement, to understand the richness of that history and the varieties of approaches theorists took in understanding and resisting gender-based oppression. Also offered as CAS PO 594.

    * WS 101 & 102 are NOT prerequisites for WS courses.

    Other courses that count for the WGS minor