Current Students

Catherine Ahearn holds a B.A. in Literary Studies from Middlebury College, where she completed an honors thesis titled, “My Hand Has a Pain From Writing: The Use of Humor in Ulysses and At Swim-Two-Birds.” Her dissertation is on the “Cruiskeen Lawn” columns of Brian O’Nolan, writing as Myles na gCopaleen. Ahearn has also worked as a Strategic Planner for EMA Boston, and is currently a Writing Consultant at the College of Arts and Sciences Center for Writing.

Alp Atabay holds a B.A. degree in Visual Communication & Design and an M.A. degree in Media Management. He is the co-founder and creative director of a media production house. He is interested in the history and culture of common seamen in the Age of Sail. His dissertation is a critical edition of a manuscript journal volume (1847-1848) with historical introduction and commentary on the ship-board journal-keeping practices of antebellum American sailors.

Chelsea Bingham holds a B.A. in English and Religion from Boston University. She received her Master’s from the Editorial Institute at Boston University for researching, compiling, and annotating a selection of letters between author Joan Aiken and her agent, Charles Schlessiger. Bingham currently works as the Editorial Assistant to The Wordsworth Circle, a journal of Romantic Studies. Her doctoral work focuses on the poetry of Stevie Smith.

Chelsea Bray holds a B.A. in English from Boston University. Over the summer of 2013, UROP funded her research that examines the garden imagery in Dickens’ novels in relation to female sexuality. While working with her advisor Dean Natalie McKnight, Chelsea began investigating the influence of the Lowell Mill Girls on A Christmas Carol, and from her findings, the two co-authored the chapter, “Dickens, The Lowell Mill Girls, and the Making of A Christmas Carol” published in the edited volume Dickens and Massachusetts. In 2015, Chelsea received her M.A. in English with a concentration in Irish literature from Boston College. Her doctoral work examines The Lowell Offering, a nineteenth-century periodical written and published by the Lowell Mill Girls.

Brian Duchaney holds a B.A. and an M.A. in English from Bridgewater State University.  His dissertation is a scholarly edition of John Steinbeck’s World War II dispatches written for the New York Herald Tribune.  A ten year veteran of the U.S. Army, his memoir about his military service, published by the journal War, Literature, & the Arts, was nominated for inclusion in the Best American Essays of 2014.  He is also the author of The Spark of Fear, published by McFarland.  He currently teaches at Bridgewater State University in Bridgewater, MA, and at Curry College in Milton, MA.

Lauren Eckenroth is a doctoral student working on a catalogue and annotated selection of the correspondence between Sylvia Beach, Bryher, and H.D. She is a senior writer at Boston University School of Law, where she edits the law school’s alumni magazine and manages content for the website and newsletters. She received her Master’s degree from BU’s Editorial Institute, for which she edited a selection of Edith Sitwell’s letters. While earning her B.A. in English at Penn State University, she assisted with the first volume of The Letters of Ernest Hemingway, 1907–1922.

Alex Brink Effgen is a doctoral student working on the later essays of Mark Twain (Samuel Clemens) before the turn of the last century. When he is not lecturing on Twain’s popular representation and its interpretations, he works full time for Boston University’s Office of Sponsored Programs as an Assistant Director, responsible for Research Systems and Funding Information.

Silvia Glick (A.B. Government, Smith College; M.T.S., Harvard Divinity School; J.D., Boston University School of Law) practiced law for many years before coming to the Editorial Institute. Her doctoral dissertation is an annotated edition of the correspondence of social activist Fanny Goldstein (1888-1961), based on papers held at the American Jewish Archives and the Special Collections of the Boston Public Library. Silvia is the assistant editor of The Journal of Interreligious Studies and a consulting editor to the Howard Thurman Papers Project at Boston University School of Theology. She serves on the governing council of the Association for Documentary Editing.

Jeffrey Gutierrez holds advanced degrees from Drew University and Boston College. His doctoral dissertation is a critical edition of William Carlos Williams’ letters to modernist journals and publishers. The letters, mostly unpublished, will be provided with contextual and textual notes, restoring material previously censored or otherwise omitted. He is also Keeper of the Editorial Institute Libraries and organizes the series Lectures in Bibliography. He has published in Essays in Criticism and Notes and Queries.

Jillian Saucier holds a BA in German from Georgetown and an MFA in Poetry from Boston University. She translates from German and her dissertation is an annotated selection of poems by Ernst Jandl and Friedericke Mayrocker in English and German.

Alissa Valles (BA School of Slavonic Studies, University of London) is editing and translating Polish poet Aleksander Wat’s Diary Without Vowels.

Allison Vanouse (BA summa cum laude, Brandeis University) is editing a catalogue raisonné of Modernism: Eliot, Joyce, Wyndham Lewis, Ezra Pound, and Beckett. She is the Program Administrator of the Editorial Institute.

Cecilia Weddell holds a B.A. in Comparative Literature from Boston University, where she graduated cum laude and with honors distinction in the major. Her dissertation will be a bilingual edition, in her English translation, of columns written by the Mexican writer/diplomat Rosario Castellanos in the Mexico City newspaper Excelsior from 1963 to 1974. Cecilia is Assistant Editor at the Boston University journal of translation, Pusteblume, and she has worked at Harvard Review, Boston Review, and Cinco Puntos Press.

Mary Erica Zimmer (B.A. summa cum laude, Literature and Classical Studies, The University Professors, Boston University; M.A.T. English Education, Boston University; M.Litt., Mediaeval English, University of St. Andrews; A.M. Humanities, University of Chicago) taught for five years in the English Department of Louisiana State University; served as editorial assistant to Joining Music with Reason: 34 Poets, British and American, Oxford 2004-2009, chosen by Christopher Ricks (Waywiser Press, 2010); and is a freelance technical writer, editor, and researcher. A Trustee Scholar, Bradley Fellow, and member of Phi Beta Kappa through her work at Boston University, she was also a Rotary Ambassadorial Scholar to the University of St. Andrews, Scotland. Her doctoral dissertation will serve as a companion to selected works of Geoffrey Hill.