Computer Science and Applied Mathematics

Computer Science & Applied Mathematics (NEW This Year!)

Technology has fueled rapid innovation throughout every industry, and continues to evolve at a breakneck pace. Professionals with skills in applied mathematics and computer science areas will be well prepared for emerging roles across a variety of sectors.

Rated the number one city in the U.S. for next-wave startups by the U.S. Chamber of Commerce, Boston is an ideal place to gain hands-on experience in a thriving hub of technology, science, and innovation.

This track offers computer science and math majors an opportunity to expand their academic knowledge through higher level courses, as well as giving students a first-hand glimpse of how careers can be developed in these areas of study.

Applicants to this track must have completed a minimum of one year of college mathematics or computer science course work by the start of the program.

Summer 1: The Academic Phase

You'll spend your first six weeks of the Summer Study Internship Program taking two 4-credit courses chosen from offerings in computer science or mathematics.

Computer Science Majors

Choose Two:

  • CAS CS 131 Combinatoric Structures

    Representation, analysis, techniques, and principles for manipulation of basic combinatoric structures used in computer science. Rigorous reasoning is emphasized. 4 cr.

    Section Type Days Times Instructor Location
    SA1 Lecture M, T, W, R 2:00 PM-4:00 PM Snyder EPC 208
    SA1 Lab T, R 4:00 PM-5:00 PM Snyder EPC 208
  • CAS CS 237 Probability in Computing

    Prereq: (CAS MA 123 or equivalent) and (CAS CS 131). Introduction to basic probabilistic concepts and methods used in computer science. Develops an understanding of the crucial role played by randomness in computing, both as a powerful tool and as a challenge to confront and analyze. Emphasis on rigorous reasoning, analysis, and algorithmic thinking. 4 cr.

    Prereq: CAS CS 131.

    Section Type Days Times Instructor Location
    SA1 Lecture M, T, W, R 10:00 AM-12:00 PM Snyder EPC 208
    SA1 Lab T, R 12:00 PM-1:00 PM Snyder EPC 208
  • CAS CS 320 Concepts of Programming Languages

    Prereq: (CAS CS 112 and CAS CS 131). Concepts involved in the design of programming languages. Bindings, argument transmission, and control structures. Environments: compile-time, load-time, and run-time. Interpreters. 4 cr.

    Prereq: CAS CS 131 and CAS CS 210.

    Section Type Days Times Instructor Location
    SA1 Lecture M, T, W, R 2:00 PM-4:00 PM Xi CAS 220
    SA1 Lab T, R 4:00 PM-5:00 PM Xi CAS 220
  • MET CS 201 Introduction to Programming

    Introduction to problem-solving methods and algorithm development. Includes procedural and data abstractions, program design, debugging, testing, and documentation. Covers data types, control structures, functions, parameter passing, library functions, and arrays. Laboratory exercises in Python. 4 cr.

    Section Type Days Times Instructor Location
    SA1 Independent T, R 6:00 PM-9:30 PM Faktorovich STH 113
  • MET CS 232 Programming with Java

    Covers the elements of object-oriented programming and the Java Programming Language. Primitive data types, control structures, methods, classes, arrays and strings, inheritance and polymorphism, interfaces, creating user interfaces, applets, exceptions and streams. 4 cr.

    Prereq: MET CS 201; or instructor's consent

    Section Type Days Times Instructor Location
    SA1 Independent T, R 6:00 PM-9:30 PM Tizio HAR 316
  • MET CS 248 Discrete Mathematics

    Fundamentals of logic (the laws of logic, rules of inferences, quantifiers, proofs of theorems). Fundamental principles of counting (permutations, combinations), set theory, relations and functions, graphs, trees and sorting, shortest path and minimal spanning trees algorithms. Monoids and Groups. 4 cr.

    Section Type Days Times Instructor Location
    SA1 Independent M, W 6:00 PM-9:30 PM Naidjate MCS B19
  • CAS CS 132 Geometric Algorithms

    Prereq: (CAS CS 111; CAS MA 123 recommended). Basic concepts, data structures, and algorithms for geometric objects. Examples of topics: Cartesian geometry, transformations and their representation, queries and sampling, triangulations. Emphasis on rigorous reasoning and analysis, advancing algorithmic maturity and expertise in its application. 4 cr.

    Prereq: CASCS111 and CASMA123 recommended.

    Section Type Days Times Instructor Location
    SA1 Lecture M, T, W, R 10:00 AM-12:00 PM Magee EPC 204
    SA1 Lab T, R 12:00 PM-1:00 PM Magee EPC 204
  • MET CS 432 Introduction to IT Project Management

    Provides a comprehensive overview of IT Project Management and the key processes associated with planning, organizing, and controlling of software projects. The course focuses on various knowledge areas such as project scope management, risk management, quality management, communications management, and integration management. Students are required to submit a term paper. 4 cr.

    Section Type Days Times Instructor Location
    SA1 Independent M, W 6:00 PM-9:30 PM Campbell HAR 240
  • CAS CS 330 Introduction to Analysis of Algorithms

    Prereq: (CAS CS 112, CAS CS 131, and CAS CS 132) or (CAS CS 235) or (CAS CS 237). Examines the basic principles of algorithm design and analysis; graph algorithms; greedy algorithms; dynamic programming; network flows; polynomial-time reductions; NP-hard and NP-complete problems; approximation algorithms; randomized algorithms. 4 cr.

    Prereq: CASCS112, CASCS131, and CASCS132; or CASCS235 or CASCS237

    Section Type Days Times Instructor Location
    SA1 Lecture M, T, W, R 10:00 AM-12:00 PM Erdos CAS 220
    SA1 Lab T, R 12:00 PM-1:00 PM Erdos CAS 220
  • CAS CS 455 Computer Networks

    Prereq: (CAS CS 112 & CAS CS 210), CAS CS 350 is recommended; or consent of instructor. Concepts underlying the design of high-performance computer networks and scalable protocols. Topics include Internet design principles and methodology, TCP/IP implementation, packet switching and routing algorithms, multicast, quality of service considerations, error detection and correction, and performance evaluation. 4 cr.

    Prereq: CAS CS 210.

    Section Type Days Times Instructor Location
    SA1 Lecture M, T, W, R 2:00 PM-4:00 PM Matta EPC 201
    SA1 Discussion T, R 4:00 PM-5:00 PM Matta EPC 201

Mathematics Majors

Choose Two:

  • CAS MA 120 Applied Mathematics for Social and Management Sciences

    Topics chosen from linear equations, systems of linear equations, matrix algebra, exponential functions and logarithms, elements of differential calculus, optimization, probability. Some sections focus on applications in economics, finance, and management. Satisfies both mathematics requirement and divisional studies requirement. MA 120 may not be taken for credit by any student who has completed any MA course numbered 124 or higher. Carries MCS divisional credit in CAS. 4 cr.

    Section Type Days Times Instructor Location
    SA1 Independent M, T, W, R 1:00 PM-3:00 PM Kanamori FLR 123
  • CAS MA 123 Calculus I

    Limits; derivatives; differentiation of algebraic functions. Applications to maxima, minima, and convexity of functions. The definite integral; the fundamental theorem of integral calculus; applications of integration. Students may receive credit for either CAS MA 121 or 123, but not both. Carries MCS divisional credit in CAS. 4 cr.

    Section Type Days Times Instructor Location
    SA1 Independent M, T, W, R 9:00 AM-11:00 AM Jiang CAS 201
    SA2 Independent M, T, R 6:00 PM-8:30 PM Li EPC 203
  • CAS MA 124 Calculus II

    Logarithmic, exponential, and trigonometric functions. Sequences and series; Taylor's series with the remainder. Methods of integration. Calculus I and II together constitute an introduction to calculus of a function of a single real variable. Students may receive credit for not more than one of the following courses: CAS MA 122, MA 124, MA 127, or MA 129. Carries MCS divisional credit in CAS. 4 cr.

    Prereq: CAS MA 121 or CAS MA 123.

    Section Type Days Times Instructor Location
    SA1 Independent M, T, W, R 1:00 PM-3:00 PM Panth EPC 207
    SA2 Independent M, T, R 6:00 PM-8:30 PM Bourguin CAS 203
  • CAS MA 213 Basic Statistics and Probability

    Elementary treatment of probability densities, means, variances, correlation, independence, the binomial distribution, the central limit theorem. Stresses understanding and theoretical manipulation of statistical concepts. Students may receive credit for not more than one of the following courses: CAS MA 113, MA 115, or MA 213. Carries MCS divisional credit in CAS. 4 cr.

    Prereq: good background in high school algebra.

    Section Type Days Times Instructor Location
    SA1 Independent M, T, W, R 3:00 PM-5:00 PM Bourguin CAS 203
  • CAS MA 214 Applied Statistics

    Inference about proportions, goodness of fit, student's t-distribution, tests for normality; two-sample comparisons, regression and correlation, tests for linearity and outliers, residual analysis, contingency tables, analysis of variance. Students may receive credit for not more than one of the following courses: CAS MA 116, MA 214, or MA 614. Carries MCS divisional credit in CAS. 4 cr.

    Prereq: CAS MA 213; or consent of instructor.

    Section Type Days Times Instructor Location
    SA1 Independent M, T, W, R 3:00 PM-5:00 PM Gangopadhyay MCS B33
  • CAS MA 225 Multivariate Calculus

    Vectors, lines, planes. Multiple integration, cylindrical and spherical coordinates. Partial derivatives, directional derivatives, scalar and vector fields, the gradient, potentials, approximation, multivariate minimization, Stokes's and related theorems. (Cannot be taken for credit in addition to CAS MA 230.) 4 cr.

    Prereq: CAS MA 124 or CAS MA 127 or CAS MA 129.

    Section Type Days Times Instructor Location
    SA1 Independent M, T, W, R 11:00 AM-1:00 PM Potter MCS B33
    SA2 Independent M, T, R 6:00 PM-8:30 PM Nan MCS B33
    SA3 Independent M, T, W, R 1:00 PM-3:00 PM Nan MCS B25
  • CAS MA 226 Differential Equations

    First-order linear and separable equations. Second-order equations and first-order systems. Linear equations and linearization. Numerical and qualitative analysis. Laplace transforms. Applications and modeling of real phenomena throughout. Cannot be taken for credit in addition to CAS MA 231. 4 cr.

    Prereq: CAS MA 225 or CAS MA 230.

    Section Type Days Times Instructor Location
    SA1 Independent M, T, W, R 11:00 AM-1:00 PM Reynolds CAS 214
    SA2 Independent M, T, R 6:00 PM-8:30 PM Thompson COM 215
    SA3 Independent M, T, W, R 1:00 PM-3:00 PM Cooper SHA 206
  • CAS MA 242 Linear Algebra

    Matrix algebra, solution of linear systems, determinants, Gaussian elimination, fundamental theory, row-echelon form. Vector spaces, bases, norms. Computer methods. Eigenvalues and eigenvectors, canonical decomposition. Applications. Cannot be taken for credit in addition to CAS MA 142, MA 442, or ENG EK 102. 4 cr.

    Section Type Days Times Instructor Location
    SA1 Independent M, T, W, R 11:00 AM-1:00 PM Panth EPC 207
    SA2 Independent M, T, R 6:00 PM-8:30 PM Douthit COM 213
  • CAS MA 267 The Mathematics of Sustainability

    The goal of this course is to develop models for sustainability. "Just-in-time" mathematics/statistics techniques are taught with immediate application, for example: geometry for flight routes; graph theory for social networks; linear algebra for operations research; fractal measures for earthquakes and tsunamis. 4 cr.

    Prereq: CAS MA 121 or CAS MA 123; or consent of instructor.

    Section Type Days Times Instructor Location
    SA1 Independent M, T, R 6:00 PM-8:30 PM Previato MCS B21
  • CAS MA 293 Discrete Mathematics

    Propositional logic, set theory. Elementary probability theory. Number theory. Combinatorics with applications. 4 cr.

    Prereq: CAS MA 123.

    Section Type Days Times Instructor Location
    SA1 Independent M, T, W, R 11:00 AM-1:00 PM Kanamori FLR 123
  • CAS MA 341 Introduction to Number Theory

    Study of integers and basic results of number theory. Topics include Linear Diophantine equations, prime numbers and factorization, congruences, and quadratic reciprocity. 4 cr.

    Prereq: CAS MA 242; or consent of instructor.

    Section Type Days Times Instructor Location
    SA1 Independent M, T, R 6:00 PM-8:30 PM Adascalitei CAS 201
  • CAS MA 411 Advanced Calculus

    Extends concepts and techniques of calculus and develops further applications. Topics include higher dimensional calculus, applications of vector analysis, uniform convergence of series, complex series, improper integrals, gamma and beta functions, Stirling's formula, Fourier series and transform. 4 cr.

    Prereq: CAS MA 225 or CAS MA 230 and CAS MA 242 or CAS MA 442.

    Section Type Days Times Instructor Location
    SA1 Independent M, T, W, R 3:00 PM-5:00 PM Fried CAS 201
  • CAS MA 433 Graph Theory

    Focus on learning the basic concepts of graph theory and enhancing the ability to read and write rigorous mathematical proofs. Topics covered include graph connectivity, planarity, graph colorings, and Euler's formula. 4 cr.

    Prereq: CAS MA 242 and CAS MA 293; or consent of instructor.

    Section Type Days Times Instructor Location
    SA1 Independent M, T, W, R 11:00 AM-1:00 PM Enkosky MCS B25

Summer 2: The Internship Phase

For the second six weeks of the program, you'll be placed as an intern in a Boston-area organization or business that matches your expressed interests. You should expect to work five days a week for a minimum of 35 hours. Most internships are unpaid.

Computer Science & Applied Mathmatics Opportunities

Internship placement sites that can be expected for this new program track include startups, technology companies, non-profit organizations, and research think tanks.

Internship Placement

  • Internship placement for 35 hours a week
  • Internship matches are based on your interests, abilities, and experience
  • All internship sites are accessible by public transportation
  • Visit our Placement Process page for additional information

Summer Study Internship Course

The Summer Study Internship Program's 2-credit Internship Course meets on Friday mornings throughout Summer 1 and two evenings in Summer 2. The course explores links between your academic track and your on-site professional experience, and provides support and guidance as you prepare for your placement.