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Business & Management Track

Boston began its commercial life as a center for maritime trade and later evolved into a leader of the Industrial Revolution, with textile mills dominating the New England landscape. Today, with an economy driven by industries such as financial services, health care and life sciences, high technology, higher education, consulting, and visitor services, Boston boasts a thriving business community with strong national and international ties.

The Business & Management Track is divided into courses for non-business majors and courses for business majors. You'll explore principles of economics, management, business, and marketing, and finish with an internship in one of Boston's many financial, law, business, or marketing firms.

"The people, the internship, and the coursework were all excellent. At my internship, I learned skills that I can easily apply to any work experience I have in the future. This is a program every college student should consider."
CAREY SPANOS, COLLEGE OF THE HOLY CROSS
INTERN, MARKETMESUITE

Summer 1: The Academic Phase
(May 23 - July 1, 2016)

You'll spend your first six weeks of the Summer Study Internship Program taking two 4-credit courses chosen from offerings designed for both non-business majors and business majors.

Non-Business Majors

Choose Two:

  • CAS EC 101 Introductory Microeconomic Analysis

    One semester of a standard two-semester sequence for those considering further work in management or economics. Coverage includes economics of households, business firms, and markets; consumer behavior and the demand for commodities; production, costs, and the supply of commodities; price determination; competition and monopoly; efficiency of resource allocation; governmental regulation; income distribution; and poverty. Carries social science divisional credit in CAS. 4 cr.

    Section Type Days Times Instructor Location
    SA1 Independent T, W, R 10:00 AM-12:30 PM Idson HAR 302
    SA2 Independent T, W, R 1:00 PM-3:30 PM Idson KCB 102
    SA3 Independent M, T, W 2:00 PM-4:30 PM Huynh HAR 316
    SA4 Independent M, T, W 6:00 PM-8:30 PM Busey EPC 209
  • CAS EC 102 Introductory Macroeconomic Analysis

    The second semester of a standard two-semester sequence for those considering further work in management or economics. National economic performance; the problems of recession, unemployment, and inflation; money creation; government spending and taxation; economic policies for full employment and price stability; and international trade and payments. Carries social science divisional credit in CAS. 4 cr.

    Section Type Days Times Instructor Location
    SA1 Independent T, W, R 9:00 AM-11:30 AM Bandopadhyay HAR 316
    SA2 Independent T, W, R 6:00 PM-8:30 PM Abdullah EPC 203
  • CAS HI 292 Capitalism in America: Economic History of the US

    Surveys the history of corporations and private enterprise since the Civil War, disentangling the evolving relationships between business and government and tracing the influence of money, markets, and their managers in American communities from factories to the frontiers. This course cannot be taken for credit in addition to the course with the title "Money, Markets & Managers: Economic History of the United States" that was previously numbered CAS HI 377. 4 cr.

    Section Type Days Times Instructor Location
    SA1 Independent M, W 6:00 PM-9:30 PM Ferleger HIS 504
  • COM CM 313 Corporate Communication

    Explores the trends and issues affecting corporations, crisis management, public affairs communication, consumer affairs, employee relations, environmental problems, and issues of multinationals. Uses case studies. 4 cr.

    Prereq: COM CM 301.

    Section Type Days Times Instructor Location
    SA1 Independent M, W 9:30 AM-1:00 PM Quigley COM 213
  • COM CM 317 Introduction to Advertising

    History, nature, function, practice, and social and economic aspects of advertising; ethical responsibilities, psychological appeals, marketing, media, research, product analysis, creative strategies, and agency operation. Students prepare a comprehensive advertising plan including a marketing strategy and speculative advertising campaign. 4 cr.

    Section Type Days Times Instructor Location
    SA1 Independent T, R 1:00 PM-4:30 PM Cakebread BRB 122
  • MET MG 101 Accounting I

    Basic principles of financial accounting underlying transaction analysis and the preparation of financial statements. 4 cr.

    Section Type Days Times Instructor Location
    SA1 Independent T, R 6:00 PM-9:30 PM Mendlinger HAR 240
  • MET MG 202 Personal Financial Planning

    The development of personal investment strategies using money and credit. Securities and portfolio management, budgeting, insurance, taxes, retirement programs, and estate planning. 4 cr.

    Section Type Days Times Instructor Location
    SA1 Independent M, W 6:00 PM-9:30 PM Mendlinger HAR 316
  • MET PS 330 Leadership in the Workplace

    Studies the interplay between psychology, leadership, and workplace dynamics within organizations. Focuses on the practical as well as the applied and theoretical aspects of organization psychology. Investigates actual work-related case studies and leadership- and work-related issues as well as the dynamic nature of the field. 4 cr.

    Prereq: MET PS 101.

    Section Type Days Times Instructor Location
  • SHA HF 100 Introduction to the Hospitality Industry

    Serves as the prerequisite to all SHA courses. Students wishing to take any SHA courses must first complete SHA HF 100. An introductory course designed to offer an overview of the hospitality industry. Students gain a historical perspective and track current events. Discusses the structure of the industry including chains, franchising, ownership, and management. Explores the inner workings of various components of lodging, food service, and entertainment organizations. Previews the important disciplines covered in upper-level classes. Actual industry examples and case studies are used extensively. 4 cr.

    Section Type Days Times Instructor Location
    SA1 Independent M, W 9:00 AM-12:30 PM Oshins SHA 201
  • SMG AC 221 Financial Accounting

    Prereq: (SMG SM 121/122 or SMG SM 131 or SMG SM 299) and (CAS MA 120 or CAS MA 121 or CAS MA 123 previous or concurrent). Basic concepts underlying financial statements and accounting procedures used in preparing statements of financial position, income statements, and statements of cash flow. Stresses the interpretation, analysis, and evaluation of published financial statements. 4 cr.

    Prereq: SMG SM 131 or SMG SM 121/122 or SMG SM 299; CAS MA 120, CAS MA 121, or CAS MA 123 previous or concurrent

    Section Type Days Times Instructor Location
    SA1 Independent M, T, W 10:00 AM-12:30 PM White HAR 322
    SA2 Independent M, T, W 1:00 PM-3:30 PM Porter HAR 322
  • SMG IS 223 Introduction to Information Systems

    Prereq: (SMG FE 101). Sophomore standing. Provides students with an understanding of the important role that information and information technology play in supporting the effective operation and management of business. Elaborates on the themes of "place to space" and the implications for business of the digital enterprise. Focuses on learning IS concepts in the context of application to real business problems. 4 cr.

    Prereq: SMG FE 101, sophomore standing

    Section Type Days Times Instructor Location
    SA1 Independent M, W 5:30 PM-9:00 PM Allen HAR 222
    SA2 Independent T, R 1:30 PM-5:00 PM Baek HAR 315
  • SMG LA 245 Introduction to Law

    Prereq: (SMG SM 131) or sophomore standing. Sophomore requirement. Provides a broad overview of the American judicial system and fundamental legal issues. Examines dispute resolution, torts, contracts, criminal law, business organizations, employment law, intellectual property, and international law. The goal is to understand not only the basic rules of law but also the underlying social policies and ethical dilemmas. 4 cr.

    Prereq: Sophomore standing.

    Section Type Days Times Instructor Location
    SA1 Independent T, R 9:00 AM-12:30 PM Fazendeiro HAR 312
    SA2 Independent M, W 9:00 AM-12:30 PM Chang HAR 326
  • SMG SM 101 Introduction to Management

    A broad introduction to the nature and activities of business enterprises within the United States' economic and political framework. Course content introduces economic systems, essential elements of business organization, production, human resource management, marketing, finance, and risk management. Key objectives of the course are development of business vocabulary and a fundamental understanding of how businesses make money. This course is intended for non-business majors. It may not be taken by Questrom students for credit nor can it be used by Boston University students toward the Business Administration minor. Non-Questrom students may register for this course directly via the Student Link. 4 cr.

    Section Type Days Times Instructor Location
    SA1 Independent M, W 9:00 AM-12:30 PM Allen HAR 220
  • SMG SM 104 Finance for Non-Management Students

    Read, understand, and analyze financial statements such as income statements and balance sheets. Covers techniques of internal financial analysis such as breakeven, budgeting, financial forecasting, and tools to aid in decision making. Introduction to the time value of money and capital budgeting using discounted cash flow analysis. Intended for non-business majors. This course may not be taken by Questrom students for credit nor can it be used by Boston University students toward the Business Administration minor. Non-Questrom students may register for this course directly via the Student Link. 4 cr.

    Section Type Days Times Instructor Location
    SA1 Independent M, T, W 1:30 PM-4:00 PM Asadoorian HAR 228
  • SMG SM 105 Introduction to Marketing

    How is it that some products succeed and some fail? In many instances, the difference is in their marketing strategy. Examines key areas of marketing including product development, advertising, promotions, pricing, and retailer decisions. Uses a combination of in-class exercises, real world examples, cases, lecture, and discussion. This course is intended for non-business majors. It may not be taken by Questrom students for credit nor can it be used by Boston University students toward the Business Administration minor. Non-Questrom students may register for this course directly via the Student Link. 4 cr.

    Section Type Days Times Instructor Location
    SA1 Independent T, R 1:00 PM-4:30 PM Utter HAR 220

Business Majors

Choose Two:

  • CAS EC 203 Empirical Economics 1

    Statistical techniques are presented and applied to a variety of economics problems. Extensive use of the statistical software package STATA. 4 cr.

    Prereq: CAS EC 101 and CAS EC 102.

    Section Type Days Times Instructor Location
    SA1 Independent M, T, W 10:00 AM-12:30 PM Rife CGS 527
  • CAS EC 325 The Economics of Poverty and Discrimination in the United States

    Prereq: (CAS EC 201) and (CAS EC 305 or CAS EC 203 or CAS EC 303). Examines who is poor in the United States and how the evidence of poverty has changed over time. Various economic theories for the causes of poverty and discrimination are presented for examination and discussion. 4 cr.

    Prereq: CAS EC 201 and CAS EC 305; (or CASEC203 or CASEC303).

    Section Type Days Times Instructor Location
    SA1 Independent M, T, W 2:00 PM-4:30 PM Tucker CAS B06A
  • CAS EC 341 Monetary and Banking Institutions

    Survey of commercial and central banking institutions. Examination of macro relations between financial organizations and principal objectives of stabilization policy. 4 cr.

    Prereq: CAS EC 202.

    Section Type Days Times Instructor Location
    SA1 Independent T, W, R 10:00 AM-12:30 PM Constantino CAS 203
  • CAS EC 356 Economics of the Labor Market

    Application of current theories of labor supply and demand, wages, education and experience, immigration, labor efficiency, discrimination, and unemployment. Appraisal of the effects of government policies on labor markets. 4 cr.

    Prereq: CAS EC 201.

    Section Type Days Times Instructor Location
    SA1 Independent T, W, R 6:00 PM-8:30 PM Conde Carvaj EPC 208
  • CAS EC 392 International Economics II: Problems and Policy

    Basic issues of international finance. Topics include the balance of payments, balance of payment adjustments, theories of exchange rate determination, and case studies in international economic policy. 4 cr.

    Prereq: CAS EC 202.

    Section Type Days Times Instructor Location
    SA1 Independent T, W, R 1:00 PM-3:30 PM Carliner CAS 235
  • CAS EC 403 Game Theory

    Models of decision-making in which the choices of different individuals interact: basic equilibrium notions in normal form games, including signaling games and repeated games. Applications include auctions, foreign policy, takeover bids, entry deterrence, cooperation and conflict, financial markets, and public goods. 4 cr.

    Prereq: CAS MA 121 or CAS MA 123 or CAS MA 127; or consent of instructor.

    Section Type Days Times Instructor Location
    SA1 Independent M, T, W 6:00 PM-8:30 PM Huynh CAS B06A
  • CAS EC 445 Economics of Risk and Uncertainty

    Prereq: (CAS EC 201 & CAS EC 202 & CAS EC 305) and (CAS MA 121 or CAS MA 123 or CAS MA 127). For advanced undergraduates. Emphasis on quantitative links between theory and data. Topics include expected utility, portfolio choice and the capital asset pricing model, interest rates and monetary policy, the relation between the real economy and the stock market. 4 cr.

    Prereq: CAS EC 201 ; CAS EC 202 ; CAS EC 305; and CASMA121 or CASMA123 or CASMA127.

    Section Type Days Times Instructor Location
    SA1 Independent T, W, R 10:00 AM-12:30 PM Persson CAS B36
  • COM CM 313 Corporate Communication

    Explores the trends and issues affecting corporations, crisis management, public affairs communication, consumer affairs, employee relations, environmental problems, and issues of multinationals. Uses case studies. 4 cr.

    Prereq: COM CM 301.

    Section Type Days Times Instructor Location
    SA1 Independent M, W 9:30 AM-1:00 PM Quigley COM 213
  • COM CM 522 Managing Corporate Crises and Issues

    Review and diagnosis of major crises and issues affecting corporations. Case discussions of five types of crises: technological, confrontational, malevolence, management failure, and management control. Examines appropriate management actions and communications before, during, and after a crisis. Reviews issues management: monitoring, analysis, strategy determination, and implementation. 4 cr.

    Prereq: COM CM 301.Grad Prereq: COM CM 701.

    Section Type Days Times Instructor Location
    SA1 Independent T, R 2:30 PM-6:00 PM Shanler COM 215
  • MET MG 410 Entrepreneurial Management: Starting, Innovating, and Managing Small-, Medium-, and Large-Sized Ventures

    Covers the four key elements of successful entrepreneurial management: choosing a business, organizing, financing, and marketing. Includes preparing a business plan, becoming an entrepreneur, raising venture capital, selling, negotiating, and building an effective organization. Topics given special consideration are the practice of innovation, the art of leadership, and how to relate talents to succeeding in innovative venture and technology management. 4 cr.

    Section Type Days Times Instructor Location
    SA1 Independent M, W 6:00 PM-9:30 PM Bonyhay SHA 202
  • MET MG 431 International Marketing

    Organization of the marketing function in international business. How government policies and practices affect marketing. Comparative marketing strategies for doing business abroad. Examination of case studies. 4 cr.

    Section Type Days Times Instructor Location
    SA1 Independent M, W 6:00 PM-9:30 PM Goncalves SHA 201
  • MET MG 472 Financial Concepts

    Emphasizes issues of accounting, finance, and economics that are important in most management contexts. Introduction to tools of financial analysis and the problems of financial management including cash, profitability, and capital budgeting. Various sources of corporate funds are considered, including short-, intermediate-, and long-term arrangements. Stresses understanding financial statements, planning and control, cost and benefit evaluation, cash flow analysis, and capital budgeting. 4 cr.

    Section Type Days Times Instructor Location
    SA1 Independent T, R 6:00 PM-9:30 PM Noorian HAR 316
  • MET MG 530 Business Strategy

    Policy problems of business organizations. Integrates the areas of marketing, finance, accounting, economics, and personnel into a managerial concept of business decision-making. 4 cr.

    Section Type Days Times Instructor Location
    SA1 Independent T, R 6:00 PM-9:30 PM Costin HAR 220
  • MET PS 330 Leadership in the Workplace

    Studies the interplay between psychology, leadership, and workplace dynamics within organizations. Focuses on the practical as well as the applied and theoretical aspects of organization psychology. Investigates actual work-related case studies and leadership- and work-related issues as well as the dynamic nature of the field. 4 cr.

    Prereq: MET PS 101.

    Section Type Days Times Instructor Location
  • SHA HF 210 Financial Accounting for the Hospitality Industry

    An introductory course in accounting designed to provide students with a basic understanding of the language of business. Examines the basic accounting processes of recording, classifying, and summarizing business transactions. Also provides an opportunity to study elements of financial statements such as assets, liabilities, equity, revenue, and expenses. 4 cr.

    Prereq: (SHA HF 100)

    Section Type Days Times Instructor Location
    SA1 Independent T, R 9:00 AM-12:30 PM Nicoloro SHA 202
  • SMG FE 442 Money, Financial Markets, and Economic Activity

    Required for Finance concentrators. The financial system and its functions. The role of money and the importance of interest rates in determining economic activity; determinants of level of interest rates. Operation of central banks; the goals and instruments of monetary policy. The roles, activities, and risk management of financial institutions. Instruments traded in money and capital markets, and their valuation. Role of derivative securities; systemic risk and other contemporary issues in the financial system. 4 cr.

    Prereq: SMG FE 323.

    Section Type Days Times Instructor Location
    SA1 Independent T, R 1:30 PM-5:00 PM James HAR 310
  • SMG FE 445 Investment Analysis and Portfolio Management

    Required for Finance concentrators. Introduction to the investment management process. Defining investment objectives and constraints. Introduction to Modern Portfolio Theory, CAPM, APT, Efficient Markets, and stock and bond valuation models. Immunizing interest-rate risk. Active vs. passive investment strategies, fundamental vs. technical analysis, trading practices, and performance evaluation. Introduction to the role of futures and options in hedging and speculation. Students are expected to become familiar with current events in the financial news. 4 cr.

    Prereq: SMG FE 323.

    Section Type Days Times Instructor Location
    SA1 Independent M, W 1:30 PM-5:00 PM Sabin HAR 310
  • SMG FE 449 Corporate Financial Management

    Required for Finance concentrators. Covers the financial manager's role in obtaining and allocating funds. Includes topics such as cash budgeting, working capital analysis, dividend policy, capital investment analysis, and debt policy as well as their associated risks. Valuation of companies, mergers and acquisitions, and bankruptcy are covered. The course requires using financial models and spreadsheets. Applications are made to current events and everyday business finance problems. 4 cr.

    Prereq: SMG FE 323.

    Section Type Days Times Instructor Location
    SA1 Independent T, R 9:00 AM-12:30 PM Nguyen HAR 315
  • SMG FE 469 Real Estate Finance

    Provides an introduction to and an understanding of real estate finance. Draws together and considers major functional areas including: structuring, ownership, finance, taxation, property valuation and analysis. The course provides a framework for decision making in the real estate investment and finance fields. The course is specifically designed to offer students interested in real estate careers a foundation upon which to build. 4 cr.

    Prereq: SMG FE 323.

    Section Type Days Times Instructor Location
    SA1 Independent T, R 2:00 PM-5:30 PM Munsell HAR 240
  • SMG IS 479 Innovating with Information Technology

    Prereq: (SMG IS 223 or SMG IS 323). Junior standing. Surveys the organizational implementation, uses, and impacts of advanced information technology including decision support systems, management support systems, and expert systems. Includes a group project to design and develop a decision support system. 4 cr.

    Prereq: SMG IS 223 or SMG IS 323; Junior standing

    Section Type Days Times Instructor Location
    SA1 Independent M, W 1:00 PM-4:30 PM Allen HAR 220
  • SMG LA 245 Introduction to Law

    Prereq: (SMG SM 131) or sophomore standing. Sophomore requirement. Provides a broad overview of the American judicial system and fundamental legal issues. Examines dispute resolution, torts, contracts, criminal law, business organizations, employment law, intellectual property, and international law. The goal is to understand not only the basic rules of law but also the underlying social policies and ethical dilemmas. 4 cr.

    Prereq: Sophomore standing.

    Section Type Days Times Instructor Location
    SA1 Independent T, R 9:00 AM-12:30 PM Fazendeiro HAR 312
    SA2 Independent M, W 9:00 AM-12:30 PM Chang HAR 326
  • SMG MK 468 Advanced Marketing Strategy

    Provides the insights and skills necessary to formulate and implement sound marketing strategies and marketing plans. Includes case analysis, guest speakers, and a marketing management simulation where students take the role of brand manager. The simulation allows students to make decisions and see results on key topics such as segmentation, positioning, managing a brand portfolio, integrated marketing communications, and marketing channels. Other key topics explored in the course include strategic planning, customer decision making, life cycle, market response, competitive behavior, new product development, and product line management. 4 cr.

    Prereq: SMG MK 323.

    Section Type Days Times Instructor Location
    SA1 Independent M, W 5:30 PM-9:00 PM Hibbard HAR 240

Summer 2: The Internship Phase
(July 11 - August 19, 2016)

For the second six weeks of the program, you'll be placed as an intern in a Boston-area organization or business that matches your interests and experience. You should expect to work five days a week for a minimum of 35 hours. Most internships are unpaid.

Business & Management Internship Opportunities

Internship placement opportunities are available at local and regional businesses and start-up enterprise, in areas such as finance and accounting, marketing and business development, and human resources.

Internship Placement

  • Internship placement for 35 hours a week
  • Internship matches are based on your interests, abilities, and experience
  • All internship sites are accessible by public transportation
  • Visit our Placement Process page for additional information

Summer Study Internship Course
(May 27 - August 19, 2016)

The Summer Study Internship Program’s 2-credit Internship Course meets on Friday mornings throughout Summer 1 and two evenings in Summer 2. The course explores links between your academic track and your on-site professional experience, and provides support and guidance as you prepare for your placement.

Meet a Business & Management Student

Student: Fatima Ismail

Courses: Introduction to Business; Introduction to Marketing

Internship Site: IMEX Cargo

On the Job: I was lucky to have multiple projects which allowed me to integrate computer programming into a real work environment. One project allowed the front office to input customer data and transactions into Excel without duplication. Another focused on Search Engine Optimization to track sources of website traffic and allow major search engines to effectively crawl the links in the website with limited errors through the use of site maps and Webmaster Tools. It was exciting to write meaningful programs.

Perspectives: The program is a great opportunity to study at a prestigious school while gaining work experience. My internship provided me with professional knowledge and a new perspective on everyday business practices. It was refreshing to see how academic habits can translate into professional work.