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Arts & Culture Track

The arts play a vital role in Boston's daily life. The city's cultural offerings include everything from small gallery shows and world-class museum exhibits to productions in the Theatre District, historic preservation projects in the Back Bay, outdoor concerts at the Hatch Shell, and summer festivals on the Boston Common.

From art history to film and the performing arts, you'll explore topics in arts and culture while gaining valuable hands-on experience through internships in local arts organizations.

"My biggest accomplishment was spending a whole summer in Boston by myself while interning for 35-40 hours a week. I feel I am stronger and more independent because of it. This was a great experience that advanced both my academic standing and my resume."
STEPHANIE STASSI, HOLLINS UNIVERSITY
INTERN, HARVARD ART MUSEUMS

Summer 1: The Academic Phase
(May 23 - July 1, 2016)

You'll spend your first six weeks of the Summer Study Internship Program taking two 4-credit courses chosen from offerings in arts and culture, including courses in American studies, literature, film, music, and art history.

Choose Two:

  • CAS AH 111 Introduction to Art History I: Antiquity to the Middle Ages

    An introduction to art history and the analysis of painting, sculpture, and architecture. Study of masterpieces from prehistoric to medieval times. Focus on monuments of Greece, Rome, and the Middle Ages, with a survey of Egyptian and Near Eastern art. Carries humanities divisional credit in CAS. 4 cr.

    Section Type Days Times Instructor Location
    SA1 Independent M, W 1:00 PM-4:30 PM Gustin CAS 303A
  • CAS AH 112 Introduction to Art History II: Renaissance to Today

    Major monuments and artists. Sequential development, from the Renaissance to the modern period, of major styles in architecture, sculpture, painting, graphic arts, and photography. Relationship of visual art to social and cultural trends. Carries humanities divisional credit in CAS. 4 cr.

    Section Type Days Times Instructor Location
    SA1 Independent T, R 6:00 PM-9:30 PM Green CAS 303A
  • CAS AH 210 Learning to See

    Strengthens your ability to describe and analyze the visual world. From fundamentals such as color and composition to the design of advertisements, propaganda, and appliances. A lab component with frequent visits to the MFA and other Boston sites provides opportunities for direct engagement with objects, images, and the built environment. 4 cr.

    Section Type Days Times Instructor Location
    SA1 Independent T, R 1:00 PM-4:30 PM Ribner CAS 303A
  • CAS AH 220 Islamic Art and Architecture

    Examines key monuments of Islamic art and architecture within their historical and cultural context, and emphasizes the diversity within the visual cultures of the Islamic world. Carries humanities divisional credit in CAS. 4 cr.

    Section Type Days Times Instructor Location
    SA1 Independent T, R 9:30 AM-1:00 PM Harrington SHA 201
  • CAS AH 389 Impressionism

    Impressionism, its sources, and its aftermath, from the painting of modern life and leisure by Manet, Monet, Morisot, Renoir, and Degas, to the evocation of spirituality, pain, and desire in the work of Van Gogh, Gauguin, Rodin, and Munch. 4 cr.

    Section Type Days Times Instructor Location
    SA1 Independent M, W 9:30 AM-1:00 PM Ribner CAS 303A
  • CAS AR 200 Heritage Matters: Introduction to Heritage Management

    Protection and management of archaeological heritage, including sites, artifacts, and monuments. Survey of heritage values and stakeholders. Issues covered include policy and legislation, U.S. preservation system, international efforts, indigenous perspectives, looting, repatriation, underwater heritage, and heritage at war. Carries social science divisional credit in CAS. Course fulfills Archaeology undergraduate topical requirement. 4 cr.

    Section Type Days Times Instructor Location
  • CAS CC 101 The Ancient World

    Begins in the ancient Near East with the origins of Mesopotamian civilization and the Hebrew Bible. Continues with an overview of the beginning and development of Greek civilization and careful study of Homer, Greek tragedy, and Plato. Students also examine architecture and the visual arts, as well as the relation of beauty and mathematics, with a study of the Parthenon and its role in Athenian Imperialism. Students will be asked to listen to additional online lectures to augment class discussion. 4 cr.

    Section Type Days Times Instructor Location
    SA1 Independent T, W, R 1:00 PM-3:30 PM Tabatabai CAS 203
  • CAS CL 102 The World of Rome

    The Roman sociopolitical achievement; the public and private values of the ancient Roman people as viewed in their literature, culture, and art. Roman family life, religion, and education and their meaning for our own age. Carries humanities divisional credit in CAS. 4 cr.

    Section Type Days Times Instructor Location
    SA1 Independent M, W, R 10:30 AM-1:00 PM Varhelyi STH 317
  • CAS EN 125 Reading Modern Literature

    Introduces key concepts for understanding major developments in modern literature. Readings in poetry, drama, and fiction from varying traditions, designed to motivate an interest in some of the most engaging, and challenging, works of our time. Topics vary by instructor. Carries humanities divisional credit in CAS. 4 cr.

    Section Type Days Times Instructor Location
    SA1 Independent T, R 2:00 PM-5:30 PM Villano CAS 204B
  • CAS EN 363 Shakespeare I

    Six plays chosen from the following: Richard II, Henry IV (Part I), Troilus and Cressida, As You Like It, Hamlet, Othello, Antony and Cleopatra, and The Winter's Tale. 4 cr.

    Section Type Days Times Instructor Location
    SA1 Independent M, W 9:30 AM-1:00 PM Siemon EGL 331
  • CAS HI 280 Special Topics in American History

    Topic for Summer 2016: History of Rock and Roll. Examines the role of popular music in American culture. Studies the origin and growth of the music industry, and attempts to integrate it into the general social and intellectual history of the country. The emphasis is on rock 'n' roll and its impact on America from 1954-1970. 4 cr.

    Section Type Days Times Instructor Location
    SA1 Independent M, T, W 9:30 AM-12:00 PM Mckeen COM 317
  • CFA MT 105 Elements of Music Theory 1

    Intended for non-music majors who wish to know more about elements of music. Covers properties of tone and rhythm, notation of meter and rhythms, and construction of scales, triads, and intervals. Sight reading from both bass and treble clefs, ear-training, analysis, and composition work is included in course activities. 4 cr.

    Section Type Days Times Instructor Location
    SA1 Independent M, T, W, R 9:00 AM-11:00 AM Aghababian CFA 216
  • CFA TH 120 Acting & Performance 1

    Summer Session 1: Actors live out stories in which they share the excitement of walking the knife-edge of important life changes. In this introductory class, we encourage playful, on-your-feet exploration of ways to awaken the body to its own sensations, to enliven the voice to its own expressiveness, and to alert the mind to the world going on around it. The class emphasizes the importance of purposeful speaking and active listening between acting partners and includes a guided exploration of how actors sift plays for the active elements that bring them alive. Exploratory exercises culminate in work on a scene from a play. Summer Session 2: Focuses on awareness of the human body and voice as expressive instruments. The approach to acting begins with preparation exercises that connect the actor's body and mind and then introduces tools for creating character and playing the action of dramatic scenes. Through exercises and improvisations, students increase awareness, strengthen the ability to speak and listen, and practice recognizing and experiencing moment-to-moment acting. The course develops the actor's imagination and creativity towards truthful, authentic, expressive, spontaneous 'serious' play as well as practical aspects of acting with a scene partner, and as the member of an acting ensemble. 4 cr.

    Section Type Days Times Instructor Location
    SA1 Independent M 1:00 PM-3:00 PM Cohen CFA 352
    SA1 T, R 1:00 PM-4:00 PM Cohen CFA 352
  • CFA TH 240 Beginning Directing

    A consideration and introduction of the basic tasks of play direction from script selection through opening night, emphasizing script analysis and interpretation and their projection into staging, as well as the process of working with a creative design team and an ensemble cast. 2 cr.

    Section Type Days Times Instructor Location
    SA1 Independent T, R 1:00 PM-4:00 PM Hopper CFA 468
  • COM FT 303 Understanding Television

    Examines the ways in which industrial factors and communication policies have shaped the medium that sits in 99% of U.S. homes. We begin by examining television's roots in radio. The remainder of the course is broken down into three stages of television history advanced by Rogers, Epstein, and Reeves (2002). The first category is TVI--the period of three-network dominance. The next stage, TVII, is characterized by the rise of cable television and the decentering of the three networks. We conclude the course by considering the current stage of television--TV III--in which the era of "on demand" has further destabilized traditional notions of content, audiences, producers, scheduling, and technologies. In addition to tracing this development historically and thematically, we confront it critically, analyzing the connections between power and money in the medium of television. 4 cr.

    Section Type Days Times Instructor Location
    SA1 Independent M, W 1:00 PM-5:00 PM Jaramillo HAR 312
  • CFA AR 136 Drawing and the Figure

    An introduction to the practice of representational drawing with the human figure. Focuses on establishing basic skills concerning the translation of three dimensional form onto the two dimensional page. Students investigate methods of identification, definition, and location of form in a comprehensive space utilizing a variety of materials and approaches. Students work from still life, the figure, interior and exterior spaces, and themselves. 4 cr.

    Section Type Days Times Instructor Location
    SA1 Independent T, W, R 2:00 PM-5:00 PM Grimes CFA 308
  • CFA AR 415 Photography 1Full

    Designed to assist the student in mastering the techniques of black and white photography, including negative exposure, film development, and print production. Critical evaluation of photographs, relationship of photography to other visual media, and study of both historical and contemporary precedents. No previous experience is required, but access to a 35mm camera with manual exposure capability is necessary. Material costs are extra. 4 cr.

    Section Type Days Times Instructor Location
    SA1 Independent T, W, R 2:00 PM-5:00 PM Muldowney FLR 530
  • CFA AR 470 Ceramics 1Full

    An introduction to methods for making both sculptural and functional works of art out of clay. Explores traditional and experimental hand-building techniques such as slab, pinch, and coil. Basic wheel throwing and vessel making are also integrated. Includes a variety of glazing and various surface treatments that enhance both sculptural and functional clay works. 4 cr.

    Section Type Days Times Instructor Location
    SA1 Independent M, T, W 9:00 AM-12:00 PM Sauve CFA 554
  • MET UA 580 Boston Experience

    Topic for Summer 2016: The Role of Architecture in Creating a Sense of Place. An introduction to the formal study of architecture. Introduces the concept that the role of architecture is to develop and maintain a sense of place. Establishes why and how a 'sense of place' is important to humans for social and psychological reasons and to societies for economic, political, and health and recreational reasons. The city of Boston serves as a living laboratory for this introductory study of architecture. Using this laboratory, students work on issues of historic preservation, upkeep, repair, restoration, improvement, modification, removal, adaptive renewal, and new construction as these processes relate to the importance of a sense of place. 4 cr.

    Section Type Days Times Instructor Location
    SA1 Independent M, W 6:00 PM-9:30 PM Maruyama CAS 201

Summer 2: The Internship Phase
(July 11 - August 19, 2016)

For the second six weeks of the program, you'll be placed as an intern in a Boston-area organization or business that matches your interests and experience. You should expect to work five days a week for a minimum of 35 hours. Most internships are unpaid.

Arts & Culture Internship Opportunities

Internship placement opportunities are available at commercial galleries, auction houses, cultural councils, museums, architectural firms, design companies, arts campaigning groups, art centers, and theater, music, and dance companies.

Internship Placement

  • Internship placement for 35 hours a week
  • Internship matches are based on your interests, abilities, and experience
  • All internship sites are accessible by public transportation
  • Visit our Placement Process page for additional information

Summer Study Internship Course
(May 27 - August 19, 2016)

The Summer Study Internship Program's 2-credit Internship Course meets on Friday mornings throughout Summer 1 and two evenings in Summer 2. The course explores links between your academic track and your on-site professional experience, and provides support and guidance as you prepare for your placement.

Meet an Arts & Culture Student

Student: Meredith Rankin

Courses: Modern Art from 1940 to 1980; Art of Classical Greece

Internship Site: Diana Levine Art Gallery

On the Job: I enhanced the gallery’s online visibility through social networking sites and an e-newsletter. I helped with special projects for clients, such as selecting artwork they might be interested in for corporate or residential settings. I also assisted with designing a window display to exhibit a new artist. My job was to convey the theme and mood of the artwork while also attracting the attention of passersby.

Perspectives: I took interesting courses that count toward my major, and I gained valuable work experience while living in an exciting city. I would never have known where to start looking in Boston for the kind of work I was interested in, and the program guided my way. Interviewing at different galleries alone gave me a better sense of the art scene in Boston, as well as of the variations among galleries in general.